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Wanting to change plugs in 6 cyl JD 55 combine.They are quite rusted,broke one,got it out and replaced.What can I do to make the other 5 easier?The engine runs,should I run it up quite warm and try again?
 

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If they are fairly out in the open why not heat them with the torch red hot?
Let them cool and see if that loosens things up?
Even trying to remove them with the engine hot might help some.
PS
liberal amounts of panther penetrating fluid or equivalent while cooling down can help too.
 

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If it was me I'd soak them down with my favorite weasel piss, run the engine to warm everything up, soak them down again and let everything cool down before tackling them. The warm/cool cycle(s) will help the penetrant to get down the threads. At least you don't have to worry about aluminum heads - they may fight like hell but they're not likely to destroy the head on the way out.
 

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Had to replace a plug on the morridge 400. Rusted solid. Put the impact on it and it come right out after a few seconds. I realize it's a little different situation as I had nothing to lose. But a good last resort maybe.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Had to replace a plug on the morridge 400. Rusted solid. Put the impact on it and it come right out after a few seconds. I realize it's a little different situation as I had nothing to lose. But a good last resort maybe.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have soaked them a few times with weasel piss and ran the engine to warm up a few times,will keep doing this a few more times and try them again.Should I spray a little ATF in intake when running to try and lube up threads from the inside?
 

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Had to replace a plug on the morridge 400. Rusted solid. Put the impact on it and it come right out after a few seconds. I realize it's a little different situation as I had nothing to lose. But a good last resort maybe.
If you can get a socket and an impact on it, set the impact low and let it hammer away. I’ve removed a lot of broken studs by welding nuts on and have had more success getting them out with an impact than just using a wrench.
 

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I like to weld a washer to the broken studs, then weld a nut to the washer around the perimeter of the nut. Easier than welding the inside of the nut and the extra heat helps to shrink the stud.
 

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I like to weld a washer to the broken studs, then weld a nut to the washer around the perimeter of the nut. Easier than welding the inside of the nut and the extra heat helps to shrink the stud.
This is how I prefer to prep broken studs also, never had much luck going through the nut. Too much twist with the extra buildup to get that far up, or the nut fills with slag before it welds properly to the nut
 

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Our FD restored a 1927 fire truck in my shop. To remove the plugs this is the order of events that need done:

1. Soak the crap out of them with penetrating fluid.

2. Drink mass quantities of beer afterward.

3. When all beer is gone and everyone is lit soak again. Take extra care to not involve any tools at this point.

4. Remove after hang over subsides.

Your results may vary.
 

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Our FD restored a 1927 fire truck in my shop. To remove the plugs this is the order of events that need done:

1. Soak the crap out of them with penetrating fluid.

2. Drink mass quantities of beer afterward.

3. When all beer is gone and everyone is lit soak again. Take extra care to not involve any tools at this point.

4. Remove after hang over subsides.

Your results may vary.
And repeat as necessary.
 

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The heat, lube, and an impact. Tapping on a wrench with hammer can do wonders. Has more control than an impact. It is old, take your time.
 

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The heat, lube, and an impact. Tapping on a wrench with hammer can do wonders. Has more control than an impact. It is old, take your time.
I had a low pressure port on the clutch of a JD 8440 with an aluminum cap on it, the mechanic said I would likely twist the aluminum fitting off. I put a box end wrench on the cap and with light pressure on the wrench, tapped the cap, it came free.
 

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Is the plug recessed into a cavity or similar that will hold fluid? If so, Normal old white or brown Vinegar is great for tackling rusted and seized metal
 

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Try to tighten a bit. If it is a tapered seat plug it likely won't move but if it has a washer it might. If it moves apply more penetrating fluid then try to back it out. Repeat.
 

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I like your suggestion but would an EP oil like CIH Hytran be an advantage for dry rusty threads to not seize while trying to turn out? For years I have kept a jug of clean used Hytran and added a generous amount of Powerup when refilling my squirt cans which I use for everything. Adding some acetone to make a penetrating oil seems like a good idea.

Also when removing tight rusted threads I think it is worth mentioning that if it is moving to be patient and work it out. Stop. Work it back in. Stop and add more penetrating lube. Work it out. Repeat often and watch to see if you are gaining. If you are trying to get the nut off of badly rusted exposed threads on a u bolt, zip cut the excess threads off. They didn’t need to be that long in the first place and if you can get the old nut off and replace with a new one, you might be able to reuse the u bolt. I recently did that on a big 1” special u bolt on the camel back suspension on my 1974 Mack crane truck. The bolt broke at a sharp corner where it went around the saddle. We cut off excess thread, heated the nut red hot with acetylene torch, worked it off, welded the broken bolt, cleaned up the fine threads with a thread file and after working some moly grease into the nut and threads, put it all back together and went to work. A couple hours of downtime and almost zero cost. I know you are not supposed to be welding on things like that but could you even get a new one and when?
 
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