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Discussion Starter · #3 ·


A close up of the grass seed going into the pickup front.

These shots were taken on my old trusty camera & scanned (so not the digital quality that I have seen on here, so my apologies in advance),

Regards,

TC.
 

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Great pics tascowboy. Awesome to see some New Zealand on the forum. Your profile says that you are from Aus? were you just visiting? Where in Mid Canterbury were they taken?
I'm an Ag student at Lincoln Uni just South of Christchurch.
Just out of interest, what did they crop yield like?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi NZ Farmer. Yes I was just visiting for work purposes (I am from Tasmania, Australia). The pics were taken on a guys place, think his last name was Watson (a fairly big operator) but cant remember the exact district name, was around the Ashburton area though.

The guy I was with thought the crop would go between 2.5 -3 tonnes / ha which was most impressive, as our ryegrass crops here yield between 1.25 -1.75 tonnes / ha (2 tonnes is the exception).

Regards,

TC.
 

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Interesting tascowboy. There is Rye grown here in Ontario as well but it is direct cut with headers 20-30ft wide versus windrowing.How wide is the pickup head 16ft?
The rye grown here is used for rotation after Tobacco and is fertilized, yields range from 1.25-3.5 tonnes/ha depending on variety and the other usual agronomic factors. BTW it sprouts here too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Could be Redhat, I am not sure. Was just in the paddock at the time, so decided to take some pics (didnt get a chance to chat with the driver unfortunately).

Interesting about the way you harvest; in the UK i believe that they direct harvest & dry theirs, usually causes problems in the combine, with the moisture content being so high.

We cut either with windrowers or disc mowers, then pick up the swaths 7-10 days later, depending on weather conditions.

Regards,

TC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think he farmed in excess of 2000 acres, mostly cropping from what I could gather. Had alot of machinery & was going to convert part of his farm over to dairying (milking 600 cows)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yes Combiness, you are correct
ryegrass grown for pasture resowing. They also grow turf ryegrass, fescues, timothy, dogstail & a few other minor grasses, as well as clovers, chicory & plantain.
 

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Quote:Yes Combiness, you are correct
ryegrass grown for pasture resowing. They also grow turf ryegrass, fescues, timothy, dogstail & a few other minor grasses, as well as clovers, chicory & plantain.


Plantain??!! Holy smokes.
Is there a profit in that? Well, I admitt it is different than the weed plantain that grows wild here in the pnw USA.


Fantastic pictures of the harvest by the way. Thanks a bunch for posting them.
 

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The plantain we grow in New Zealand is the narrow leafed variety, we also has the broad leaf variety which is a weed.
plantain is used in many New Zealand pasture seed mixtures. plantain and chicory make up the herb component of our pastures. (white clover being the most common legume and Perennial ryegrass by far the most common grass species)
This is our weed plantain

and this is the good variety that we sow
 

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Actually, there are may, many species of wild plantain that grow in North America. Many are considered just nuisance weeds or lawn weeds.

However, there is one species from which we get the valuable psyllium seeds. I can only guess that specialty combines are used to collect this seed. The husks are valued as a main ingredient in fiber laxatives as well as bulk fiber supplements.
 

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Quote:The plantain we grow in New Zealand is the narrow leafed variety, we also has the broad leaf variety which is a weed.
plantain is used in many New Zealand pasture seed mixtures. plantain and chicory make up the herb component of our pastures. (white clover being the most common legume and Perennial ryegrass by far the most common grass species)
This is our weed plantain

and this is the good variety that we sow



Wow! Thanks for the new info nzfarmer. That weed looks identical to the weed variety in oregon on our farm. The crop variety is different than any I've ever seen before.

Is the chicory the same sort of chicory that can be used in coffee? I've never used it before, but i know of some folks that put chicory of some kind in their coffee for a different taste.

I have to ask this question. What windrower made those windrows, and what is the setup on the cutter bar?

If I could figure out what happened to my membership at photobucket, I'd post a few pics of fescue harvest here.
 

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as it looks like it was not a windrower that cut the fescue
i think it was cut with a disc mower since the swath is that wide
and then nothing in between and a swath again
and the gras does not point in a direction
 

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Quote:as it looks like it was not a windrower that cut the fescue
i think it was cut with a disc mower since the swath is that wide
and then nothing in between and a swath again
and the gras does not point in a direction



I suppose that could be. To me, looking at picture 2 it appears that just to the left of picture center, you can see what appears to be the center of the field. Then in pic 3 I'm seeing the combine picking up the row backwards. Looking at how its feeding from the belt to the auger, as well as the way the grass is laying just in front of the belt.


I often run backwards to the direction of cutter travel if the belt teeth have trouble. Also sometimes on a rotor machine if the straw is tough, the direction the straw lays when it hits the impellers makes a difference in power consumtion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
It might even have been cut with a finger mower (sickle bar mower), seemed to be a few of those over there used for cutting grass seed. It was actually ryegrass not fescue.

The chicory is a forage type (Puna is a common cultivar / variety).

Cheers,

TC.

PS; Seems I have upset someone, as my Karma has dropped since I was last on the forum
 
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