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Is it though? I thought they were the same with the exception of the front chaffer extension which we removed from day one. I'll have to do some more thorough research on that. I agree on your cleaning area point though.
You get 12% more BOTTOM sieve area on the all 2016 models versus the 2014 model, that is i believe, 7 or 8 extra louvers.And like you say not matter what model the extended precleaner should be removed in small grains.
 

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We have been doing the repair ourselves the last three years,we have a excellent guy that knows deere combines doing the inspections.It has cut the cost in half but it is still insane cause parts prices are getting out of hand.Working on these machines ourselves we can see how these combines are built to cost you LOST of money in parts,Many bearing are way too small for the application and need replacing every two years.the idlers are tin ****, instead of cast and get bent,the belts don't last a quarter of the hours they used to,the advanced powercast tailboard works good but is a money pit because of being designed the way it is... .It cost us about 13 grand a year with filters per machine and that is a s670,header not included.
 

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Next time we update it will most likely be a class 7. As long as it is built for my heavy headers the only downfall is hopper size is a little smaller. The stripper header is a game changer for horsepower requirements. My numbers include some (probably 1/2) of my header costs, but not all. I use 6 different headers and I spin the numbers a little differently for expense categories. the # of headers is also why switching to a different brand of combine isn't realistic in the short term.
You can buy grain tank extension in either 75 or 150 bushel for the S670 or S770 from a guy in Indiana I believe. We put the 75 bushel ones on ours, I think it was around $1100total to do both machines, and less than an hour to install. Google; Power Topper Extender
 

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We have been doing the repair ourselves the last three years,we have a excellent guy that knows deere combines doing the inspections.It has cut the cost in half but it is still insane cause parts prices are getting out of hand.Working on these machines ourselves we can see how these combines are built to cost you LOST of money in parts,Many bearing are way too small for the application and need replacing every two years.the idlers are tin ****, instead of cast and get bent,the belts don't last a quarter of the hours they used to,the advanced powercast tailboard works good but is a money pit because of being designed the way it is... .It cost us about 13 grand a year with filters per machine and that is a s670,header not included.
Obviously as the hours increase the cost of maintenance increases. How many hours are you at?
 

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Getting pretty old 1600 rotor hours.We run a combination of Wildfong concaves,precision elements, redekop blades and things like wear strips on discharge and overshot beater we build ourselves.It is a lot cheaper and those concaves and elements make the machine preform better.
 

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Would love to know what it costs on average to do repair on a Class machine over a 5 year period.Doing crops like lentils and beans and taking in dirt and stuff.How frequently do belts and bearings have to be replace on those machines.
 

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On a Lexion the belts go for a long time except the APS or precylinder belt and the impeller belt. If you plug it with a slug in these two areas and burn the belt you will likley need to replace it in season. As far as bearings they also last a long time. They use good name bearings and over half of them can be greased. My one machine has 1500 separator hours and we have changed very few bearings due to wear and quite a few of the belts are original. All the modifications have really helped these machines run a lot smoother and better than 10 years ago. The lentils and soybeans tend to wear out the concave. At 1500 hours the original concave needs to be replaced. Chopper blades wear like any other make.
 

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Would love to know what it costs on average to do repair on a Class machine over a 5 year period.Doing crops like lentils and beans and taking in dirt and stuff.How frequently do belts and bearings have to be replace on those machines.
I did a total cost of ownership on a 1999 Lexion 480 that I owned for 11-12 years. It had 1600/1250 hrs on it and came from corn and bean country, Funk Nebraska. It had combined 1.8 million bushels when I bought it and needed quite a lot of wear parts replaced or rebuilt like main cylinder, APS, impeller, vertical unloading auger, some sheet metal items like the top of the clean grain elevator, complete new Redekop Mav chopper. Otherwise was in very nice condition. I did most of the work myself on that major rebuild and put in about $30,000 of parts including a new Sunnybrook cylinder and Mav chopper and doing rebearing and seals on several gear boxes. That work brought it back to excellent condition. I ran it for 11 years, some later years as a second machine, putting on about 1600 engine/1300 thresher hours over that time. Over the years we changed most belts and bearings, sieve hanger bushings etc. as we did major disassembly of components. I included more things in my total cost than the way you did it. Header cost. Ownership cost - Purchase price minus selling price plus interest cost. I also included another fairly major refit of concaves, impeller, APS, rebuild rotors, bubble up auger, unloading auger, feeder house etc. the year before I sold the machine. It was in better shape when I sold it than when I bought it. I figured the total cost of ownership of that combine over 11 years was about $14/ acre. That number would probably have gone down over the next 500-1000 hours. We are in fairly high yield of wheat, barley canola, heavy straw and wet condition area. As a cost per bushel number I am going from memory but IIRC for repairs over the whole time was about $100,000 for a million bushels, so 10 cents Canadian. I always thought for a fairly high hour, high bushel combine those numbers were reasonable. Of that total cost for repairs, about $25,000 was money poorly spent to dealers over and over chasing a couple of electrical gremlins. They never could fix the reel speed problem so with $240 from a local hydraulics shop for a flow control and an electric linear actuator problem solved. The new owner loves the combine and like me, has had almost no in harvest downtime with it. I would expect this machine to run another 1500-2000 hours with only average repairs because of the above average repairs put into it recently. For 5 years it ran along side of a 240 hour 590 and in canola did everything the 590 could. It might have been 10 % behind in tough wheat. It did this burning 12-15 Imperial gallons per hour and was the lowest grain loss of any combine I owned, but comparable to the 590. I sold the combine because I retired and am simply interested in all these numbers because I still love all colors of iron and keeping it working.
 

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On a Lexion the belts go for a long time except the APS or precylinder belt and the impeller belt. If you plug it with a slug in these two areas and burn the belt you will likley need to replace it in season. As far as bearings they also last a long time. They use good name bearings and over half of them can be greased. My one machine has 1500 separator hours and we have changed very few bearings due to wear and quite a few of the belts are original. All the modifications have really helped these machines run a lot smoother and better than 10 years ago. The lentils and soybeans tend to wear out the concave. At 1500 hours the original concave needs to be replaced. Chopper blades wear like any other make.
I agree with SSK. He was posting while I was typing. He makes a good addition to what I said. Another after thought relating to long belt life is that most of the pulleys, or sheaves and even some idlers are very good quality machined cast iron. Lexions have more belts and bearings but don't cause a lot of problems. For example the chopper drive has 3 shorter belts. Way less trouble than one long belt that whips and jumps.
 

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Getting pretty old 1600 rotor hours.We run a combination of Wildfong concaves,precision elements, redekop blades and things like wear strips on discharge and overshot beater we build ourselves.It is a lot cheaper and those concaves and elements make the machine preform better.
I come from a Heavy equipment background where tractors and loaders consistently run 30,000 hours with only modest mid life rebuild/repairs. I have been involved recently with 2 980 Cat loader complete rebuilds. 100% stripped down to frame, all pin holes line bored and rebushed, complete new wiring, cab interior, glass, drop in engine and the rest of the components rebuilt, etc. etc. Full Cat warranty. All for $200,000 less than a new one and no DPF,DEF,EGR etc. I know it is a different world but shouldn't our farm equipment be able to run longer by rebuilding it and lower our per acre and per bushel cost?
 

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I do miss the days of our old JD 7720 when it was pretty straight forward to fix. Man, it was cheap cheap cheap running them! Also like was said earlier the type of crop you push thru that combine will affect the repair bill.
My 5,000 hour 8820 that I bought a couple of years ago just for fun is down to about $4 per acre - including the purchase price. And that is cutting a few acres of lentils along with our 100+ bu irrigated grain.

Kinda looks to me like it would be cheaper to run a fleet of old 8820's and hire people to run them compared to making a payment on a new combine and having to put more $/acre in parts into them.

Our 9860's take way more parts to keep them running and it's mostly parts that an 8820 has as well, the 8820 parts just don't fail or they are cheap to replace when they do.

For example, we had to put all new shaker arms on our 9860 because the bushings aren't replaceable. They cost about $800 in total. I put bushings in the shaker arms on my 8820 for a little over $60.

The sieve frame on our 9860 shelled out. It seems to be a fairly common occurrence on 2500+ hour machines and yet all the 20 series I have been around have never had a problem.

And then there is the occasional electrical problem - not common, but we have had to replace the header lift computer, the hvac computer, and a few other little things to the tune of over $2500. But I guess I did have to run a new wire to the speed sensor to get ground speed on my 8820 to the tune of less than $0.50...
 
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