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Good thing you posted a picture. You are not measuring the right way. The measurement that is so critical is the distance between the rub bar and concave at the back of the concave. I like to set mine to 2-3 mm of space between the keystock of the concave and the highest point of the rub bar or the part of the rub bar that is closest to the keystock at the back of the concave.
 

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The concave really needs leveled and/or checked properly. You must measure each side of the concave using the same bar on each side.

First, find your "high" cylinder bar. Tighten concave, turn cylinder by hand. Use allen wrenches (metric) and find the bar that is closest to a concave bar. Slide the allen wrench in and slowly turn cylinder to find the one that ticks the wrench with the smallest tool. Take a punch and mark this bar from the side so it can be found a year or two from now. Do this for both sides. These two bars will be the bars used to measure concave gap for both sides.

Now measure concave gap as the book explains. You want the back of the concave to be closer to this marked bar than the front.
 

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I'm saying it sits 0.5mm higher in the front than the back.
Ok.
But that is not what you want.
You must have a wedge, exactly as posted above.
I'm not a Claas expert by any stretch, but by the photos the threshing parts seem in very good condition.
Concave sure has big slots, probably need cover plates to do hard thresh wheat I'm thinking.
 

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Other than the small bits of chaff the sample looks pretty decent . It seems a little more wind may be part of your solution .
 

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#15 Dec 16, 2015
stsdavew said:
I run a 585 in usually tough wheat conditions. I use the small grain keystock aps grate with disawning plate closed i found i got more returns with it open. I use the intensive threshing segment and no concave filler plates and have not been happy with the sample. My concave is not the proper small grain concave though. It is one used for wheat and corn kind of an inbetween i was told. A friend of mine has a 595 with the same concave except he has 4 of the concave filler plates installed and no intensive threshing segment and he does get a better sample than i do. Ive ran this way two years now and if i want to get a real good sample i have to return a fair bit and i feel i get a little too much cracking. After this harvest for what its worth i bought a sunnybrook concave and cylinder... Hopefully next year i will Be happier with the sample.
I think you will be impressed with your new SB setup. I have used their cylinders for 15 years but not the new concave. I think both components contribute to more complete threshing, right up front, before partially threshed heads get into the cleaning system, which then have to be rehandled as returns and would contribute to overloaded return and more cracking of grain. I think that having the ability to keep the grain inside the concaves until it is 100% threshed is very important. Remember you can increase concave clearance and/or slow down cylinder speed to decrease agressiveness, but in hard thresh conditions you have the ability to adjust the other way and not overload the return and not have unthreshed grain following the straw out the back. I use the 6.5 mm aps grates with keystock and Intensive thresh segments in for wheat, barley and canola. I have left the deawning doors open but in hard thresh wheat you could close them. My 480 has a corn concave with oval shaped 18 mm slots. I made 4 rows of filler plates that bolt on the bottom side of the concave and work well. Almost no rotor loss. I just leave them in all the time, but I am not doing peas, where you may want to take them out. I do not like fillers on top of the concave because the keystock does not do its job if not fully open.

I always felt that if you have whitecaps, you need to tighten up the openings in the front concave area until all that grain is threshed. A Lexion has a huge amount of separating area in the rotors and should not have losses , unless it is grain still in the head following the straw out . Having the front concave area closed up more and the SB cylinder, I can thresh CPS wheat in good dry conditions at 15 to 25 mm clearance and 650 to 750 cylinder speed with almost zero loss. In tough conditions close the concave down (maybe as close as 12 mm) and speed up the cylinder.




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The post might not have mentioned that when measuring the rub bar to concave clearance at the front of concave, you actually count back 4 bars to take your measurements on both sides. I agree that the clearance should be less at the back end of concave forming a wedge so as grain falls through and volume of material reduces, you maintain the pressure on unthreshed crop by narrowing the space, and threshing continues all the way to the back of the concave.
 

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I did a search under Transaxial and subject “480 concave” and came up with several threads on this subject of concaves. Worth the read to learn your machine.
 

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I hate to hijack the thread, but I have a concave question. I was tightening things up for thrashing flax and I had “M2” or the front clearance to about 7mm and the rear (M3) to 2.5mm. I ran the separator and then the back clearances change. I bled out the concave cylinder and such. What am I doing wrong? Seems like the measurements always jump around and never stay to where I last left them. Can I also tighten up the front gap at all? Those nuts slacked off to tighten up the gap on M2 so I had to use that plate on the right hand side to tighten up both sides and all I got was 7mm.
 

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dankorange, the concave settings can be a little tricky and it can be hard to get it to where you are happy. One bit of advice is the large bolts that go through the sidewall toward the front of the concave, especially the front two, make sure they are free to travel, both while adjusting, and occasionally during service I suppose. Some lube can help. Also, when adjusting the clearance, do so with the "high bar" on each side. Newer machines have these marked already.

There are times during and/or after adjustment, that the rear of the hydraulic cylinder will get adjusted to achieve final clearance, especially if you want a real tight minimum clearance. The sensor linkage also needs readjusted if you want CEBIS to put "7 mm" back at that tight position. This slotted hydraulic mount adjusts the entire concave gap, both front and back, left and right, and the APS grates.
 

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As far as the bolts that can hang up when adjusting the concave, they are the two on the very left (on the picture that I am seeing). They go through the wall of the machine and attach to the concaves. The blocks that keep them secured in the wall can hang up during adjustment.
 

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Like seedcleaner said lubricate the bolts at the front that the concave pivots and slides on. If the combine has been outside much you can get rust in these areas and the concave will not slide into the same position all the time because it is getting hung up. My 595 was bad for this after sitting on a dealers lot for 4 years when we first got it.
 
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