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Has anyone used screw piles for a farm shop post building. I have looked at virtually all the other options and am considering screw piles, just curious if anyone had used them and if so what size, and what you thought.
 

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just built a 80x120 heated shop using screw anchors instead of concrete piles. poured a 2 ft grade beam on top of the screw piles using the styrofoam forms. Screw anchors were a better alternative than cement piles because of the higher water table. All the anchors were drilled in one day no mess and the contractor used a computer monitor gauge to measure torque to ensure the ground was strong enough to hold the weight of the building. Anchors were engineered to 15 ft in length and i think 16 inch diameter. ill have to recheck that spec. smart system and simple
 

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I assume you mean the helical was 16" diameter, do you know what the shaft diameter was and what height of walls did you go to. One other question are you stick building or pole give that you did a grade beam, I assume stick??
 

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yes the helical was 16 inch and the shaft was 4 1/2 inch , ill check back with contractor as exact specs. yes it was stick built on grade beam but the general contractor was going to looking at possibility of attaching a sleeve to top of piles for pole type building i guess similar to integrity buildings with their cement pilings
 

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I assume you mean the helical was 16" diameter, do you know what the shaft diameter was and what height of walls did you go to. One other question are you stick building or pole give that you did a grade beam, I assume stick??
the building has 20 ft walls, 2x8
 

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I am in the process of building a pole shed on screw piles. I can't tell you much yet because all that is done yet are the screw piles. As far as the screw piles are concerned I am extremely impressed. They are well below the frost level and anchored extremely well. I would not hesitate to choose this method again. I had wondered how they would square the building but they had it all figured out. They squared up and strung lines to know where to drill the screw piles in. They did as best they could to get them precise but due to ground conditions they were sometimes off by an inch or so. They then used a laser and cut off the tops of the screw piles at the proper height. Next they squared up and strung new lines that they used to position the brackets that they attach the poles to on top of the screw piles. The final step was to weld the brackets on. Everything should be as precise as possible. The building crew should be here within the next few weeks.
 

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I am in the process of building a pole shed on screw piles. I can't tell you much yet because all that is done yet are the screw piles. As far as the screw piles are concerned I am extremely impressed. They are well below the frost level and anchored extremely well. I would not hesitate to choose this method again. I had wondered how they would square the building but they had it all figured out. They squared up and strung lines to know where to drill the screw piles in. They did as best they could to get them precise but due to ground conditions they were sometimes off by an inch or so. They then used a laser and cut off the tops of the screw piles at the proper height. Next they squared up and strung new lines that they used to position the brackets that they attach the poles to on top of the screw piles. The final step was to weld the brackets on. Everything should be as precise as possible. The building crew should be here within the next few weeks.
I would be really interested to see some pics once the building crew starts installing posts.
 

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I ran this unit in Alberta for 5 years. The shop we used in Hanna, Ab was owned by a guy who installed both driven piles and screw piles. Screw piles take a lot less equipment to put in and hold up better because of the helical that is attached to the shank of the pile being able to hold a vertical load.



Depth to refusal is often a lot lower, depending on load characteristics, because of the helical.



In traditional straight pipe pileing, the depth of the pile needs to be calculated by knowing the load on the pile. then you need to know frost depth and double that just to keep the pile from moving due to frost. If your frost depth is 6 feet usually, you need 12 feet of pile just to counteract frost and then add on to that the load bearing depth you need.


A helical pile needs to be below frost depth, but then the helical is designed to counteract frost and hold the load put on the pile, this makes for a shorter pile that is quicker and easier to install.



If you are loading the pile asymmetrically, then more calculation is needed to determine diameter to resist bending loads.



 

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