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If I were to buy 1 machine to clean my own seed, what should it be? I want to save some of my own seed (not clean it to certified specs).

I'm looking for reasonable price, and easy to run/set. It would have to work for wheat, peas, lentils, barley, oats (listed in order of importance to me).

A rotary cleaner looks simple, cheap, and works for multiple crops. Would that be a good place to start?

Thanks for your guys insight.

BB
 

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I think it will be tough to find ONE single machine to do what you want very well, with such different crops. For wheat/barley an indent setup would work best for a half decent job. For the peas lentils oats an air screen type would suffice for most applications. At any rate make sure you have a lot of air. Air is a great thing, and offers a lot.

I guess the next question is, how clean do you grow crops? Combine them clean? etc. I have a custom cleaning business, and the variance between farmers is insane. Some is nearly seedable, some is full of crap, chaff weeds, etc., which makes it a big challenge to do a good job. If you are a clean type farmer, with a nice sample, a bit of air and any well sized screen machine should suffice, but if you often have chaffy, whitecappy, poddy grain, you may need a couple or more machines to do a real good job, as you probably want to remove the weeds etc. quite well.
 

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I think it will be tough to find ONE single machine to do what you want very well, with such different crops. For wheat/barley an indent setup would work best for a half decent job. For the peas lentils oats an air screen type would suffice for most applications. At any rate make sure you have a lot of air. Air is a great thing, and offers a lot.

I guess the next question is, how clean do you grow crops? Combine them clean? etc. I have a custom cleaning business, and the variance between farmers is insane. Some is nearly seedable, some is full of crap, chaff weeds, etc., which makes it a big challenge to do a good job. If you are a clean type farmer, with a nice sample, a bit of air and any well sized screen machine should suffice, but if you often have chaffy, whitecappy, poddy grain, you may need a couple or more machines to do a real good job, as you probably want to remove the weeds etc. quite well.
Since you probably know this, can you explain what a gravity table is? I'm familiar with some other cleaning systems, but have never really figured out a gravity table - but from what I've read, it sounds important for good seed. Also, any idea how many machines/what somebody would want if they wanted to set up a small portable system? I've seen small co-op owned ones, up to a larger tri-axle system that looked pretty slick.

Bruce
 

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I have never run a gravity, they are'nt really necesary. That being said, they are an amazing machine which separates based on density, so ergot, fusarium kernels, midge damaged, and frosty kernals which may be the same size as a sound kernel, will get split out via differences in density, rather than size. I did look at them, but are expensive for what I wanted to do, and the above problems can be effectivly cleaned out with a very good aspiratin system fairly well. Someone else may have more info on gravity tables???

As far as setup, aspirators, indents, some kind of grader, and an air screen machine is a basic set-up. So at least 3-4 machines each doing a different seperation. IE length, width, weight, bulk, and to some extent density. A gravity would usually be run most efficiently at the end of the operation, to take advantage of well cleaned seed, which makes them easier to set. which brings me to this. A gravity I hear is a finnicky creature at times. They all are, but you really need to know what your about when running one I hear at least.
 

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On our farm we have a Gsedal 5 in 1. It puts through about 90 bushel an hour in wheat. They are a fairly good machine. Your grain goes through scalper, then into a pair of grader shells and finally into one long indent with two different sections with different sizes on them. We have done wheat and barley with it, and have also done peas with it but it is hard to get the thistle heads out because they are the same size. It does a great job and is fairly simple. The only thing that you could add would be a gravity table.
 

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I have experience with the gravity table, and I think it does a fine finishing job. However it is a bit finicky as previously stated and I don't think they would be particularly suited to a portable operation.
 

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there are two types of gravity tables one that blow up from the bottom and vac types. They take lots of hp a vac type with around 200 bph might have 30 to 40 hp mainly used for grass seeds the ones that blow up from the bottom use about a third the power.How they work is you suspend the grain on a bed of air and the table shakes and is angled two directions and the grain stratifies by its weight
 

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By the way gravity tables are a specialized piece on machinery that takes the last little bit of impurities out of the sample hopefully
 

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Holy crap. Can somebody explain step by step what these things do, like the Gsedal setup? I understand some of the machines, but not others.

Thanks.

Bruce
 

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seed is split into two streams and enters the grader section these are sloted drums that the slots are just small enough to not let the seed fall thru so the seed runs out the end and the small seeds and spilts etc fall thru onto the screening
 

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next the seeed goes into the indent section the first stage is the small pocket (indentations in the drum) and as the drum rotates seed that is short stays in the pockets longer before it falls so inside there is a trough with an auger in it you set that to catch all the pieces just shorter than the seed
 

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the seed continues down the drum to the next section of indent drum with large pockets it works the same way but lifts the long pieces so you catch the long seeds in the trough they are augered in to the screening and clean seed runs out the end
 

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uthinkyourwet said - "I have never run a gravity, they are'nt really necesary."

I think that statement can be somewhat misleading. I feel a gravity table is quite necessary if you're looking to do a top notch job of cleaning seed. Mind you I'm quite picky and I'm wanting a top quality product coming out of our seed plant, but I can see your point about a gravity not being necessary if your looking to do just a quick clean up job.

That being said, I've also seen enough gravity tables at some plants that are not set properly and therefore not doing a good job of separation. I can see why some people would believe gravity tables don't do a good job when the tables are not set properly.
 

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All I mean is unless you have addmixture of the same size, but a different density, IE. ergot in wheat, etc, I never had trouble getting some pretty ugly, and I mean UGLY grain clean. A gravity is a wonderful tool, just not a necessity to most. KWIM?
 

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Are there complete packages you can buy, or are you usually better to mix and match? Might be interested in setting up a portable system. I would want to collectively recapture any crap that's left over too.

Bruce
 

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My thoughts are that a gravity table is a must for cereal cleaning and upgrading. I built my portable cleaning machine about eight years ago. I had barley with some ergot in it that AB didn't like. On a large gooseneck trailer I put a air screen then a indent cleaner. These machines removed most of the ergot but the ergot bodies the same size as the kernels still remained. With the ergot peaces being slightly lighter I added a counter balanced gravity table to finish the job. The air screen starts by aspirating off the light stuff then shaking out the small material. The indent cleans by length and takes out short and broken kernels, and long pieces like wild oats and white caps. The gravity table then rejects the less dense material the other machines were unable to remove. The lighter and the less smooth kernels are lifted to the top of the grain mass by upward air blast and flow down to the lower side of the table. The denser and more smooth kernels go to the bottom of the grain matt and ride on the screen that shakes them up to the high side of the table to be saved.
Starting with a good sample the air screen and indent reject about 5%. To get the very best seed the gravity table rejects about 20-30%. You may think the sample looks O.K. after the indent but the grain rejected by the table never looks good enough to seed. "Seed the best, sell the rest". All but the "scalpings" can be blended back in with your commercial grain to be sold at the elevator.
Every year there is some grain to be up graded. I've upgrades grain that has ergot, frost, sprout, and the last few years grain that has the falling numbers a little low. I am just in the middle up grading durum with falling numbers of 200-230 to 290-340. I spent about $50,000 on the cleaner and it has paid that back every year........
 
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