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:22: Early emissions was doing whole company’s in.

What truck is it??

Our ‘15 KW T800 day cab is 8050kg stamped on the door seal.
 

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I had to look that model up as there are so many models and configurations within Peterbilt trucks, what I wonder then with that listing for the suspension, to me that sounds like it has the leaf/air bag steer axle suspension system. I don't know anything about it but just that it exists and the idea is a better ride but still a stable platform according to the bits I have read that is. The rear makes sense with the air trac as that has been Peterbilts main heavy duty air ride for years now and one of my trucks has that and its made to be fairly stable so its not like trucks that feel your riding on a floppy marshmallow, the reason I say that is because of high loads on some air rides would not be so good. With it being that new of a truck it may have disc brakes as well, not sure what options are available to go to drum or disc these days since there would be more of a push all the time to go to disc brakes.
 

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I have a couple of older Peterbilts with air trac suspension. They aren’t as smooth a ride as the air leaf but are more stable for high loads, as previously stated by northern farmer. Some guys would value that more than others
 

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Speaking of the ride I actually have two Petes, one with the drive axle air trac and the other has the air leaf and in all honesty hauling grain with either of them, I can't really detect much difference and in fact possibly due to a bit longer wheel base on the air trac unit, I think it rides slightly better, no worse for sure. Now low air leaf, that is probably a different story as I believe they were more designed to ride softer and not made with the ground clearance either. There are lots and I do mean lots of Peterbilt air trac suspension trucks in this part of Alberta and looking at the local dealership that is in large part what they bring in for a suspension.

I'd say also that those who might be from south of the boarder hear of thicker frames then they are used to and 46 rears and think its crazy but one has to keep in mind we don't live in the 80000 lb restricted surrounding and also need some toughness to take our less then desirable roads, and again large loads ( overloaded ) in soft fields etc
 

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Even here in the land of 80000 pound limits I would probably look for a heavier spec rear axle truck next time. We tend to be overloaded and operate in crappy conditions. We have broken leaf springs and differentials. We don’t haul enough for the added weight to amount to anything
 

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I would say a truck specd like that would be geared more to severe off road duty, such as logging or oil field work. Not really needed for super B's or what most normal farmer would put it through. Those nut bars on Ice Road Truckers would be a good candidate for a truck like that!! lol
 

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I would say a truck specd like that would be geared more to severe off road duty, such as logging or oil field work. Not really needed for super B's or what most normal farmer would put it through. Those nut bars on Ice Road Truckers would be a good candidate for a truck like that!! lol
I wouldn’t say 3.91 gears are severe off road gears.
 

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It’s old school thinking that you need 46s to pull super B. I don’t know one truck company that has broken a 40 rear end pulling grain trailers or hauling hay.

You guys must have a lot better conditions to truck in than we have. We have blown more 40's than I can count and even killed a couple of 46's while hauling hay.
 

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Remember what New Farmer said this particular truck was spec'ed to do, 100% highway oil tanker job which means they went with that spec for a reason, and that gearing being a highway gearing to match that engine and load being pulled. As a comparison one of the Pete's I have was bought brand new by the previous owner and specifically to pull Super B fuel tankers on highway from the refinery to the Grande Prairie area, 3/8 frame and 46000 rears with 4.10 gears, 24.5 tires, 18 speed, 3406E as its an older truck but that is a very common spec around this area and not just for off road use like some might assume. On/off road units pulling 3 axle trailers ( or more ) from what I've seen use much the same spec but may be geared lower, for instance my other Pete has 4.30 gearing and I think its about perfect for an all around unit since I don't haul long distances and also having 4 way lockers is a bonus.

If I am correct in what I guessed before about the truck being talked about, if it has the air ride steer axle and disc brakes, they upped the weight capacity some on those steer axles because of the higher performance of the disc brakes putting more forces into that axle, that's my understanding anyway.

It's the 20000 pound front axle and things like double frames that one wants to stay away from for normal highway tractor use, that would become a boat anchor to hit the scales with.
 

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Assuming your back survives the suspension.

Thank god for an air ride cab and air ride seat, even a normally equipped highway tractor with air ride on the rear that is older and doesn't happen to have air ride on the cab is not a joy when doing a ride along and sitting on the solid passenger seat, not at all !
I know what its like to drive ( and own ) an old highway tractor that had multi leaf steer axle suspension and spring rear and no air ride cab, the only air was in the seat and holy fuk, that's all I can say compared to typical trucks on the road now.
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
You seem to know your trucks. Yes the front axle is disc brakes. It is taper leaf springs on the front and Air Trac on the rear, I read closer and figured that out. 24.5” wheels
Online calculators show about 1550rpm at 110kph (68mph) when in top gear, so the 3.91 should be good. Most highways close are only 100kph speed limit. Highway 43 is the big 110kph run.
Plan to haul my own hay as well as grain, but I don’t drive semis in the fields, I bring everything back to a central yard with a Haukaas wagon.
 

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Being that you drive truck for a company, I expect you or those you work with have connections or its their shop perhaps that you could bring the truck to for an inspection per say from someone that knows these units well. Checking over things mechanically and such things as doing plug swaps on the diffs and transmission etc, whatever can be learned from the laptop, also like what was mentioned in getting all records if any from the dealer for anything that was performed on it warranty or otherwise. This mind you assuming that the entity holding the truck will allow you to do this and also the test drive aspect as unfortunately at auctions unless one had prior knowledge about a unit its hard to figure it all out as it sits at Ritchie Bros. Just a thought anyway vs signing on the dotted line before you have a chance for a closer look and feel of the unit.
 
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