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Discussion Starter #1
How can you tell when the shaker bushings need replaced before it is too late? I've only owned my Axial flows for 2 years and haven't been threw the bushings yet. Just curious what the early symptoms are. Also what is the step by step on relacing them?
 

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look at bushings, are they cracked or hammered out, got problems with the shoe hitting side of machine, depends how folks take care of there machine, need to put shoe in midstroke when its gonna sit for extended periods of time, model and hours, scott.
 

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Here's a link I made with pictures and explaination for using the cih shaker centering tool. http://talk.newagtalk.com/forums/thread-....7&highlight=cih

But that is for after you press in new bushings. Depending on your annual hours, if you've ran it 2 years and dont know if/when they were replaced by the previous owner, (assuming used machine) you might just consider a bushing kit this year.

Once you have some experience with worn out bushings, you will develope a "hunch" or "suspicion" about a bushing during the morning look over. Tell tale signs are a tear in the rubber, or a rubber that is bulging outward from the sleeve. Sometimes if the bushing adhesion to the metal sleeves has come loose completely, a grey color dust or ooze if you had water inside, will appear around the bushing.

If you do not wish to buy a bushing press die set, see if your dealer will loan or rent you one. It is worth the money, takes the doubt out of proper pressing technique. The dealer should loan you the centering tool. If you do not trust your skills, you might take all the arms to the dealer and have them do the press work, just visually inspect each bushing before you leave the dealer to insure there is no deformation of any sleeves or any sort of deep gouges in the sleeve.
Improper pressing technique can "mushroom" the outter sleeve or push the inner sleeve loose from the bushing. It can also gouge or deform the bushing if it is forced into the arm from an imperfect angle. A well respected IH owner and mechanic, Jon Hagen has said to use brake fluid as a lube for installing the new bushings as the brake fluid will not harm the rubber when you get some fluid on them during installation. Sounds great to me.

If you do the pressing yourself, see if the dealer will allow you to view the service manual for this procedure. There may be a chart that shows the approximate dimensions that should be achieved when the new bushings are installed.

If you miss finding a bushing that is out for some time, it will begin destroying the rest of the shaker system. Often it will start with breaking the tail of the chaffer rails where the chaffer is held up by a 3/8" bolt. Next stop may be the grain pan behind the bed augers. It will crack and disintegrate rapidly. Chaffers will break in half. Lots of bad things will go wrong right when you least can afford them to.

If you do the bushings, dont neglect going through the bearings and cams on the shaker drive. The whole thing should be inspected and worn parts replaced.

Dont know if that helped you any or not, but it's all I can do right now.
 

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Thats the way to go!!

In this proces I would remove the sieves and get in there to do a check for cracks in the weldings of the framework in the shoe.

I can recall some of the things doorknob describes.... You loose some precious time/$ if you neclect looking after the bushes.
 

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before you remove arms for shaker system mark them, also keep track of shims behind arms, you can buy tool from case to install bushings, about 150.00 us dollars, arms have a slight taper on one side, this is the side bushing goes in, you will need tool to center shaker system, i agree with above posts remove framework and check rails, time consuming, goes a lot easier if theres two people, scott.
 

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Check the rails, especially at the front for cracks. Also check the bolts at the front of the rails that hold the angle iron for the lower sieve. The hole got wallowed out on mine and dropped my lower sieve the second day of wheat harvest this last year. It was a bugger to fix in the field. Joe's non abrasive hand cleaner works really well as a lubricant for putting the bushings in.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all of the reply guys. My 2188 had the bushings done when it went through the shop before we bought it. The 3 1480s are probably coming due soon.
 

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Liquid dish soap is also a good lube to install the bushings. When putting things back together make sure to put the shaker in the middle of the stroke so the rubber only has to twist a little each way, otherwise the new bushings won't last as long as they should. It is not a hard job, but the first time takes a while.
 

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I replace mine every 2 yrs, about 4-500 hrs. They are usually just beginning to go down. It's a lot cheaper to replace them than a sieve
 
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