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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am rebuilding the shaker system on my 1660 and I can not find any dealers locally that have the 60 sized alignment tool (one does have the 80 sized tool) so I am looking for a way to do this without buying the tool or paying for a service call from half a state away.

If one was to assemble the complete system, (except for the final torquing of the bushing bolts) with all new bushings and with the bearing flange bolts loose and then tighten the bearing flange bolts, would that not at least "some what" align the shaft? Maybe this is a dumb idea but I have though about this for a few days and I can't come up with any reason this would not work.

Or if anyone knows where I might be able to rent this tool please let me know. The Case-IH part number of the 60 sized tool is 87746840.

Thanks!
 

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don't know how the 60 would be diff from the 80 as the only diff is the width but I have never used a tool to do this on my 1480s and knock on wood life has been good. The only thing that I see that would cause trouble is if you didn't line up the hub on the wish bone but you would have to be drunk to mess that up, when the belt is off roll her around when you get everything snugged up, see if anything binds and tighten up
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The 40-60 and the 80 sized tools are definitely different. I have the printed instructions and while the design is the same, some of the components are different. The 40-60 tool part number is 87746840 and the 80 size tool is 87583611. There must be some differences in the dimensions between the two different sized machines.
 

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Pat, the main issue I can see with using this method is the weight of the shaker system would tend to push the shaft to the back of the hole slop on each side. It would simply push the bolts of the bearing flanges to their end limits.

There's got to be a dealer that would ups you the tool to use. After all the work you've done, it would sure be good to finish it the way you want, rather than short it now and have that on your mind all the time. I'd even send an email to case telling them your local dealer is lacking in capacity without that tool and see if they would pay the bill. It's ridiculous that a dealer today would not have that tool.
 

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You guys realize the the tool came out 30 years after the first axial flow combines were introduced? Never once used that tool and have had shoes go 1000+ hours after rebuilding before needing a bushing. Shimming, squaring and tightening good bushings properly with tight cam to shaft fits and slip clutch and hub fits will result in a good repair. The tool is not needed. The reason few dealers have the small frame tool is that the small frame machines were out of production by the time they introduced the tool which was mandatory for the large frame combines but not mandatory for small frame combine as they were not current machines.
 

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You guys realize the the tool came out 30 years after the first axial flow combines were introduced? Never once used that tool and have had shoes go 1000+ hours after rebuilding before needing a bushing. Shimming, squaring and tightening good bushings properly with tight cam to shaft fits and slip clutch and hub fits will result in a good repair. The tool is not needed. The reason few dealers have the small frame tool is that the small frame machines were out of production by the time they introduced the tool which was mandatory for the large frame combines but not mandatory for small frame combine as they were not current machines.
The tool come out around 2006 or so. It is not "needed" as you say, but it does do a good job of alignment of the shaker to itself. It also does put the shaker in perfect center. Again, not "needed", but when available, worth it to use. IMO.

FWIW, before the tool, there was a procedure to use to aid with centering and alignment. Once the machine hit the field, there was a certain amount of superstructure shift that took place. Some more than others, which is why some machines can go forever without issue, while others are constantly in the shop. IMO
 

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Ken Adams
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Pirlbeck - whether you reassemble with or without tool and want to check if everything is proper - check for side to side movement at rear of shoe as shoe is cycled back and forth - rolling combine over there should be zero side to side movement at rear of rails that support chaffer - if there is any, it means left and right drive are not aligned (timed) properly and shoe will be subject to a twisting on each cycle.

It is the difference between a couple hundred hours of service and a couple thousand hours of service without a problem!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Pat, the main issue I can see with using this method is the weight of the shaker system would tend to push the shaft to the back of the hole slop on each side. It would simply push the bolts of the bearing flanges to their end limits.

There's got to be a dealer that would ups you the tool to use. After all the work you've done, it would sure be good to finish it the way you want, rather than short it now and have that on your mind all the time. I'd even send an email to case telling them your local dealer is lacking in capacity without that tool and see if they would pay the bill. It's ridiculous that a dealer today would not have that tool.
Good point about the weight of the shaker system messing things up doing it my way.

I agree, I sure would like to find a way to have this checked with the tool when I get it together enough.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
1651.35 US dollars, Scott.
Scott, yes that is the price I was quoted. I think the dealer cost is in the $1200+ range. If I could find a way to buy it for close to the dealer cost, I may consider buying it, because it would probably cost me about half of that just in trip and labor charges. If I do end up buying it, I would consider renting it out to recoup some of my money.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You guys realize the the tool came out 30 years after the first axial flow combines were introduced? Never once used that tool and have had shoes go 1000+ hours after rebuilding before needing a bushing. Shimming, squaring and tightening good bushings properly with tight cam to shaft fits and slip clutch and hub fits will result in a good repair. The tool is not needed. The reason few dealers have the small frame tool is that the small frame machines were out of production by the time they introduced the tool which was mandatory for the large frame combines but not mandatory for small frame combine as they were not current machines.
steigerman, This shoe rebuild will include the following new parts.

New shaker hex cross shaft and the updated, improved bearings and flanges.

New shaft cams and keys for both sides and new slips clutch parts for the RH side.

Updated cast iron "pretzel" shoe supports, with new needle bearings and seals and new stub shafts for the arms.

And of course all new bushings.

I think the fact that this is a 60 size short shoe machine does work in my favor as far as the repair lasting. I do know of some 80 sized machines around here that have had repeated failures in the shoe area. I do not know of how thorough of a rebuild were done on them after the first failure. One of the local dealer personnel (that did not know about this tool) admitted to seeing unexplained repeat failures of the shoe area on some machines

As far as the tool being "mandatory for the large frame combines" one of the local multi store dealerships does not have it at any of their stores.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Pirlbeck - whether you reassemble with or without tool and want to check if everything is proper - check for side to side movement at rear of shoe as shoe is cycled back and forth - rolling combine over there should be zero side to side movement at rear of rails that support chaffer - if there is any, it means left and right drive are not aligned (timed) properly and shoe will be subject to a twisting on each cycle.

It is the difference between a couple hundred hours of service and a couple thousand hours of service without a problem!!
flatfoot, That is a great idea to check for side to side movement. It makes sense that if there were any problems with the "timing" it would walk the shoe side to side.

Thanks!
 
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