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Few yrs ago I was looking at adding 60 ft heated space on the front of our post building. I wanted it on the front of our building so we could pass through the heated space to the cold storage in the back making it one building.

I talked to a couple guys but nobody wanted to actually attach the new building to the old. They were worried about liability and the soundness of the structure they didn't build.

Is this common or did I just talk to the wrong people?
 

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I would think you just need to find the right guy. There is an old building in town that used to be for manufacturing. The guy that bought eventually found some to make the whole building 4 feet taller so he could rent it out to trucking companies
 

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Few yrs ago I was looking at adding 60 ft heated space on the front of our post building. I wanted it on the front of our building so we could pass through the heated space to the cold storage in the back making it one building.

I talked to a couple guys but nobody wanted to actually attach the new building to the old. They were worried about liability and the soundness of the structure they didn't build.

Is this common or did I just talk to the wrong people?
Can you get the guys who built the original building back to do the addition? I know goodon has come back and added onto neighbors pole buildings.
 

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My Goodon cold storage shed was attached to an older arch-rib via an old wooden grainery being used for the walkway. The contractors grumbled a little when I slowed them down, but it all got done no problem. My latest project was turning an old hog barn into a heated shop which included blowing the dry sow section off and replacing it with a new 14 ft wall shop. It's all attached to an open wall on the end of the old barn and was done with an independent contractor. I think it's time to shop around as well. If the old structure is basically sound, it shouldn't be a big deal. If the old construction is sketchy, then I can see you might have problems. This is what harvest looked like around my yard, but you get the idea. The conjoined buildings are on the left side of the picture, my new heated shop just catches a corner of the right...
 

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All you have to do is tell the contractors that this is what you want done and whoever’s willing to build what you want is going to get the job.
Construction in the Regina area is pretty slow it shouldn’t be hard finding someone.
 

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Anytime you are adding new construction onto existing you need to be concerned with what the frost and moisture does in regards to causing one building to move different than the other. Especially around Regina. Our shop in Regina was all professionally engineered and built in late 1980s and they still managed to screw up and not account for the lean-to office area moving different then the main shop footings built to accommodate 15 ton overhead crane. No shortage of evidence of ground movement issues around Regina.

Now two buildings with pretty basic footings probably isn't going to present a problem but I can see a builder not wanting to commit and say it won't be a problem when we all know the potential is there. The easy solution is to have the shop built as close as the builder says they will and then put your own breeze way on later. Then even if the buildings move differently in the future it is an easy repair to the breezeway.
 

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As kenmb mentioned, concern will be how they will move differently. Knowing how the original build was constructed floor slab/underground would be great information for us or the builder to have. Specifically is it slab on grad and no foundation/footings?


They WILL move differently and you will need to handle the transition from old to new with materials that allow the different movement.



I had done a steel beam building 5 years ago attaching to the old structure. No issues that I'm aware of to date. If the old has existing footings and foundation, you'll want to dowel into it to minimize vertical movement. If the existing is slab on grade, then there is other solutions to accommodate that situation too.


Always exciting to hear people building on here! Best of luck!
 

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Do you really want them attached? Most older building were not high enough out of the ground which makes drainage a problem. If fire comes do you want to loose everything or just the stuff in one building? As mentioned earlier I would be concerned about the movement as well especially if one is a pole frame and the other one is on a grade beam / footing and piles. Apart from being able to save potential cost of a wall it would likely be easier to construct being able to get around all four sides of the building. Every situation is different. You need to do what is best for you.
 

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One other thought is if you join the buildings and have a large door to move equipment between the two you basically loose the storage space where the door is on the cold storage. This can be very significant if your cold storage is not large. If it is a little man door then it may not matter.
 

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One other thought is if you join the buildings and have a large door to move equipment between the two you basically loose the storage space where the door is on the cold storage. This can be very significant if your cold storage is not large. If it is a little man door then it may not matter.

Same thought here, years ago we thought of creating a heated shop in one end of a shed and leave it cold in the other but decided after it was built that it made far more sense to leave the building as is and don't mess up what we had. The problem aside from the very real risk of having too much tied together for reasons of fire, you end up loosing out with both sides of that center wall if there is a large door connecting the two because you can't set anything in front of the door, that ruins a lot of storage/work space in the far end of a typical shop. In the long run I don't think anyone has regretted keeping the two building styles, heated/cold storage separate.
 

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I know of one pole type, heated at one end, cold other. Frost moves one and not the other. Roof leak wrinkled tin issues created. South door in sun great, North facing ice, snow, frost heaves, not nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
This is a frame shed on grade beam with piles so it should connect to another engineered building fine I would think.

The pass through to cold storage is a nice feature.
 

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Also and I don't think mentioned, if we grasp this correctly and you would have an overhead door on both ends of your shop portion ( and would not do so if you had the shop as a stand alone building for example ) and a door of any size that conjoins the two buildings, that insulated door would negate any savings one ever thought to have by joining the two buildings.

Perhaps there is something you are envisioning that we are not grasping but I just see a lot of potential negatives and few positives.
 
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