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Discussion Starter #1
Before I went farming, I worked in a body shop painting cars. One old guy I worked for used to laugh at us "young guys" for wasting our money on tools. Except for Snapon wrenchs etc. he made most of his own. The more cheap chinese crap I toss in the waste bin, the more his words echo in the back of my mind, and I've started building a few myself. Just curious to see what everyone out there has built in his own shop that turned out to be a very valuable tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
cool... I made this hacksaw after I broke a couple flimsey Chinese ones that wouldn't keep the blade tight. This one is made from 1 inch flatiron with a piece of steel tubing for the handles. Tensioner tabs were broken drill bits welded into square steel stock. The frame is rigid enough to tighten the tension with pliers... works very well. Don't look too close at the welding because I got lazy and grabbed the arc when I should have went and got the MIG.
 

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Great idea. That thing looks awesome. When you break a bandsaw blade, I hear they make great hack saw blades. I dont recall how to punch the holes, but your frame would sure hold up to a heavy blade like that. A good hack saw is a must on any farm. Thanks for the idea.
 

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I have accumulated lots of shop built stuff over the years, few larger items like an heavy duty engine stand that rivals anything OTC builds, special roller stands for splitting tractors and stuff like that. Nice thing about building it yourself is you make it to work exactly as you want it to. The smaller stuff is usually specialty tools, those little tools that make things easy that would otherwise be very time consuming. I have a whole drawer in my one side cab of modified wrenches of all types. Have made several homemade wheel bearing type sockets and other odds and ends. My philosophy is if I am going to use it often or its for a job that requires certain precision, I'll spend the bucks and buy it, if its something I may only need once or twice, I'll build it. I have boxes of good used tools I keep around just to cut up for making special stuff.

I have a cupboard shelf and a box full of items that would mean nothing to most people, its all shop made versions of those special items needed when assembling transmissions and such, for a lot of the older stuff you cant buy them anymore, and some of the newer stuff is priced stupid and can take several weeks to special order. That was one awesome thing about the older manuals, they would give the OTC or Kent number of the item you needed, and then they would also give the dimensions and such so if you wanted to you could build your own.

Two that are in progress right now is a wheel dolly for tractor wheels and final drives complete and I'm halfway done making that wuzzy special socket with the slot in the side you need to tighten down those Bosh injectors;)
 

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I made a 6' long wrench for tightening the gang bolts on our disk rippers. It seemed like we were always having them come loose, and just couldn't keep the dang things tight. I took and old broken 1" square shaft that was about 6' long and cut it to 2' & 4' pieces, I then took (3) 3/8" pieces of flat iron and cut out the "socket" part, then stacked them and welded them to the 2' shaft. the 4' shaft has a piece of bigger square tubing that slips onto the 2' shaft, making it about 6' long. I know it's tough to imagine, but I'm not good at explaing things like that. If my calcs are right, my 220lbs jumping on the end of a 6' shaft puts somewhere around 1300+ ft/lbs of torque on the nut...never had one come loose yet
 

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dad has a whole box of custom made toolsused mostly when he worked at IH he used them then when case and IH went to together those tools went to the caseih shop and he quit and started doin work himself he borrowed the tool made his own with a few little adjustments he wanted to make it better
 
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I got fed up with cheap sandblasting cabinets, have made several other tools for the shop just cant get into my old photobucket account :(


Enjoy the video!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here's one that is incredibly simply but handy. I get oil in bulk barrels, and never have the right spanner wrench around when I need it. I made this one out of a piece of scrap pipe, some rod and a short piece of flatiron. If I was going to make another one the pipe would be longer to give me more knuckle clearance at the barrel. The round side opens the big bung, the flatiron is basically a large screwdriver that opens the small one. It hangs on the wall over the barrels and is always there, because it's useless for anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This might be the crudest slide hammer you've ever seen, but it's incredibly handy for jobs where you would break a normal one. Works great for taking off the inside race of junked bearings and doubles as a pry bar when in use. I started with a broken U bolt that once held an IHC deeptiller spring and made the slide out of an old discer bushing which slides on some square tubing.
 

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This might be the crudest slide hammer you've ever seen, but it's incredibly handy for jobs where you would break a normal one. Works great for taking off the inside race of junked bearings and doubles as a pry bar when in use. I started with a broken U bolt that once held an IHC deeptiller spring and made the slide out of an old discer bushing which slides on some square tubing.
I LIKE IT !!!!! I may need to copy that, but with a chisel on the end for going the other way. Thanks. I'm not as good of aim as I used to be with a separate hammer on the chisel. And I have the bruises to prove it.:(
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hmmm....never thought of putting a chisel end on one, but makes sense. Going this way I push agains a large nut/washer arrangment, going the other way you'd have to do some sturdy welding. Wouldn't even have to start with a Ubolt, but I sure wish I'd kept my college notes on tempering and case hardening.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I made this little fork back in my hog barn days when I needed a way to remove fans from electric motors to change bearings without destroying the fan. It just clamps in the vice so you can smack the shaft with a punch. I put an old cushion or a stack of feed bags on the floor to catch the motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
This one may look like a pile of scrap iron on the shop floor, but I built it to straighten John Deere feeder chain slats without removing them from the machine. The main frame is built from a packer axle off an old IHC drill, and the tabs are cut from Morris cultivator shanks, so it's very strong, and needs to be. It bolts to the feeder chain slat. Depending on which attachment I use, I can use the bolt threads to pull the slat up, down, forward or back. I've started using Grade 8 fine thread bolts with it for extra control when putting the air ratchet on it, and it will gall the threads occasionally, but bolts are cheap compared to pulling the chain out and straightening it. Those slats are tough!
 

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I made this cutting table and put it next to the welding table. It is the same height as the welding table so it basically can be used as one table. Replaceable slats and a sheet metal shoe guard to keep sparks out of my shoes.
The vise is removable from the welding table and there is a swivel arm on the far left of the cutting table, but you can only see a small bit of it. I did not do very good taking the pic.



 

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Discussion Starter #17
Interesting idea. When I built my welding bench I put a vice on each side perfectly in line... now if I need to weld something long together I can clamp it in both vices and hold it straight while I work.
 

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Interesting idea. When I built my welding bench I put a vice on each side perfectly in line... now if I need to weld something long together I can clamp it in both vices and hold it straight while I work.
Good idea. I like that better than mine. The swivel arm is my idea of the same thing. I can clamp one end of things to it and position the other in the vise. But 2 vises would sure hold a lot better.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Kind of happened by accident in my case, I inherited a free vice from a hog barn that burned down. I was a little worried that the metal may have been weakened, but so far it's taken a beating (literally) on my welding bench without fail. I did have to do a bunch of grinding on it to mill down the back half of the front section due to warpage. It was curved up enough that the vice wouldn't slip back and forth through the base freely. Hey Buck... you said you had a whole toolbox full of homemade stuff.... where's your pics? I'd like to see that tire stand you're building.... thinking I'm going to need something for removing duals here too.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I had to change a rim on a tractor that had been equipped with clamp on dual hardware about 40 years ago. We've owned the tractor since the late 70's and had never had a rim off, so I knew it was going to be hard to get off. Add to this that the retaining nuts had been replaced by hoops for the clamp on dual hardware so conventional wrenches were not going to work. I had a broken shaft under the work bench with a 1 1/8" hex on the end, so I made a forked wrench by grinding a slot in the end and putting a bolt through for support. The nice part is that I was able to use both my homemade breaker bar and a big box end wrench to twist with. Doubles the torque using 2 arms instead of one, and was much easier to hold steady. They weren't easy, but I was able to get them all off. Using a 3/4" impact on it was tempting, but doing it this way I was able to get everything off without breaking anything. The homemade breaker bar is a broken S-K 1/2" ratchet welded solid inside a piece of black pipe cut the right length to fit in my tool box. Yes, I could have gotten warranty on it, but now it's my fav breaker bar.
 

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