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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to start building a shop this summer. The question I have is that I want a big door to be able get large equipment in if I need to. I can put a bi fold door and be plenty wide but then every time I open it in the winter, the shop will take forever to warm up. I want to put a double overhead door in it with a removable center. It has to work well and easy enough so I will actually want to use it though. Who makes these. Any other ideas are appreciated.
 

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some friends of ours put in a double door like your talking about and the only problem they have is in the winter when the frost heaves the floor sometimes they have trouble getting the center post in and out. we put in a 40 foot hydro swing and we had enough room to put in a 12 foot roll up next to it. so when pulling in small trucks you dont have to cool down the shop as much. one other draw back with the bifold is you loose head room. say if the door opening is 16 feet the way the door opens with the opener in the middle of the two sections you end up with only a 15 foot opening. with the one piece hydro swing you have the clearence of what your opening is. just some suggestions for you to think about good luck with your new shop.
 

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We went with a 34' and 24' wide roll up on each end of our shop.
Set them up with remote openers , we pull up to the door hit the remote drive in and hit the remote again before you are stopped and the door ends up being open for a very short period of time.
We have floor heat and within a few minutes we are back to near normal temp.
 

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We have a bifold door on our cold storage building the door has 18' clearance height by 40' wide. the actual door frame mounts part way up the rafter so the door frame is about 21' high. When it is fully open you have the full height of your building 18'. We looked at the overhead doors with the moveable center but we lost 2 feet of head room to get things in. I didn't want to spend $2000 for an extra 2' building height to loose it in a door that costs more than the bifold. Since we got our door they have sped the motor up and have remote control up-down with remote latch as well. I know we don't have it on a heated shop but I don't think you would loose that much heat with the bifold depending on how much you are going in and out. I like 8010's idea with the seperate smaller door for every day use. We are thinking of building a shop as well and I am thinking we will have a bifold on it. Ours is a diamond door from Winkler Manitoba. I will watch this thread for any other door solutions and opinions hope this helps and enjoy the shop I am in envy.
 

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I think the heated floor is a big difference on the heat recovery plus it dries the floor good and don't make it so cold working on the concrete.
 
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I think the heated floor is a big difference on the heat recovery plus it dries the floor good and don't make it so cold working on the concrete.
he is right get floor heating in your shop its worth the money. air heating makes it to warm to work in and to cold of a floor to work comfortably on.

they have big doors that go 30 foot wide.
we have 2 doors with a centerpost. it works but the centerpost is sometimes a pain IMO.
Don't go with bifold doors on a shop. its just not the greatest.

and if you want quality shop doors go with the hanover doors, they are way better than the **** that we have in our shop. (jincx or somethings i dunno biggest piece of **** door i've ever seen)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got a quote from Hanover. 40 ft opening. One door 16 ft, other 24. Removable center post. 18 ft high. 19950$. Seems pretty reasonable. That's installed with openers and remotes. They have a video on their website, looks pretty slick.
 

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We have been looking at different door designs for a future heated shop. Could anyone who has put in a 40ft door comment on how often you need or use a 40ft width of opening? Would a large overhead door such as a 24ft+ size would get the majority of the equiptment in and out of your shop? It seems like the equiptment keeps getting bigger. With a 40ft header width you still won't get it in a 40ft door. We are wodering if it is wise to put in the largest overhead door and leave it at that or do you feel it is a mistake not putting in a large 40 ft door into a heated shop?
 

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the big door is nice to have you would be surprised how often it comes in handy. like i said in another post is if you have the room to put a smaller one next to it they come in handy also so your not always opening the big door and cooling down the shop just to pull in a pickup or bringing in smaller things.
 

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In my new shop I put the 40 ft bifold door in the gable end of the shed from HiFold doors (good people to deal with). This allows for a 16ft sliding door and a 12 foot overhead on the side for smaller equipment. It's nice cause you can pull the combine and head in the end and work on it and while waiting for parts and such pull the truck or tractors in the side doors to clean up or work on.

John
 

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As compared to big door, folding door is especially convenient for its narrow corridors and passages. It has also advantage that when delivered, it is completely ready for installation, while normal door are difficult to install. But is little costly.
 

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I never used to be a fan of the bifold because they are slower. 3 years ago we converted an older 68x150 quonset to be our main shop. Installed 45x18 at each end to be able to drive through with air seeders , combines etc. Had to go with self contained frame/bifold because of quonset design. Love these doors.. Reason 1-They do lose a bit more heat when they are opening and closing but I feel they by far make up for it by retaining heat while they are closed. Far more energy efficient than a wide overhead. Reason 2-Maintainance over time will be considerably less. We have a number of overhead doors in the 8-15 year old range, that require more maintainance than I like. Dangerous! We don't work on any overhead door springs ourselves. Call the professionals. And unraveled cables are not fun. Pros and cons to both systems but I now favor the bifold. installed 2 17 wide x 18 high doors in our grain receiving area this summer and chose bifold. Very happy with Diamond Doors from Winkler,MB.
 

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I have no experience with them but I have seen their displays and if I wanted a large door on a heated shop I would seriously look at the hpdoors. They are a one piece hydraulic door but the top end runs in a bit of a track. A little bit of headroom would be lost but I really like the idea. I think it would be very easy to get a good seal on the door and they are supposed to open quite fast. They are also self supporting so less stress on the building. On a cold storage shed I had looked at putting double overhead doors with a removeable post but instead went with bi-folds. I am happy with them but for a heated building I would put in some sort of one piece door and I think the HPdoors are worth looking into. JMO
 

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Big single swing door or by fold for a shop area is my plan. Putting a smaller roll up door in also for just as you said not having to let all that heat out when not needed. Going in-floor with possibly a large blower heater for quick recovery.
 

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Go with infloor heat first. You'll be suprised at how quick a building warms up w/out a quick recovery heater. After you see how fast it is, you most likely will not see a need to install a quick recovery heater. You can buy more tools or a lot of beer with the money you save.
 

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I would go with a hydraulic, one piece door. The bigger the better.....that way you never outgrow it. I just put up a shop and on the gable end I went with a 60' x 19' hyd. It seals up tight and is as simple as you will find. Powerlift Doors in ND built it.
 

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In my new shop I put the 40 ft bifold door in the gable end of the shed from HiFold doors (good people to deal with). This allows for a 16ft sliding door and a 12 foot overhead on the side for smaller equipment. It's nice cause you can pull the combine and head in the end and work on it and while waiting for parts and such pull the truck or tractors in the side doors to clean up or work on.

John
Planning a overhead in the side of my shop(in addition to the end bifold) Do you find it handier to center the overhead door or place it closer to the opposite end of the building than the bifold?
 

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We have double 15ft overhead love it thhe centre post doesnt lift if you put a pile underneath it,
Overheads are fast but pricy, would build the shop always bigger than intended, never heard a guy say ah **** my shop is still to big after 10 years
 
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