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we have a 60 by 100 steel shed that we want to turn into a shop its got a cement floor in it already, now I know floor heat is the best but can you make floor heat with cement thats already poored, what else is the best heat to heat it and insulation.
 

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I would love to know the answer to whether or not one can install infloor heating in a shed that has a cement floor already installed as well; anyone done it or looked into it?

Maple,
We have been debating doing this for sometime now, we were thinking that we could put the hose down and then just poor a few inches of concrete over top of the hoses, but am not sure if this will work or if it is a good idea. I would like to talk to someone that has tried it or to a company that specializes in infloor heating.
 

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Unless someone chimes in and says their uncle's neighbor did it, I'd say no. Radiant-heating tubing has to be laid before the concrete is poured. It's tied into the reinforcing mesh.
 

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If you have concrete and want to put in floor tube heating you should tear out the current concrete. The system is too expensive to not do it correctly. Protect your investment. If done correctly a reflective insulation is rolled down first. A sheet of wire mesh is then laid down to attach the tube runs to and then rebar is laid out on top just like you would for a normal concrete floor. In floor heat will be the most expensive upfront install by far.

Radiant tubes from the ceiling or forced air (any fuel) are your best options if you can't part with your current concrete.
 

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Of course you put down tubing and pour a couple of inches of cement over top. It would have to have small rock in the concrete though for it to settle out properly and get the correct finish on the top. It will not be insulated under the slab or on the sides, so if you live in a cold climate you will have some heat loss.

From a pure heat situation, the top of the slab is where you want your heat pipes. It has enough concrete for a heat sink and it will radiate upwards very well. If you place your heat pipes deep down below the concrete, you loose much more heat into the ground, as it is harder to radiate through the mass upwards.

Downside to being in the top of the concrete is that you have to be carefull when drilling/nailing, etc. that you don't hit it. Make sure that you put in several different loops beside each other so that if one should leak that you can turn it off and just use the rest. If you put a loop outside the door and cover it you can melt the snow off the outside pad also.
 

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We have had excellent luck (and cost savings over forced air) with Infrared tube heaters.

It warms objects not the air, once the floor and everything else is warm it doesn't take much to keep the place warm.

You will notice that you can open doors and run equipment in and out without loosing the heat that is already in the objects in the room. This translates into faster recovery of shop temps.

IMHO you can't go wrong with tube heaters.
 

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If you can get enough oil to keep you going thru winter, a used oil burner works very well. There's always people wanting to get rid of used oil, just be sure it doesn't have water or anything else in it. Makes it hard to keep burner going.
 

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I agree with 5thgen radiant would be your best bet. Used oil heaters work depending on your oil supply and the size of your shop, and what your ambient temps are. One hanger I used to work in had a used oil heater in it. If you wanted to get warm you had to cut your oil with jet fuel. Otherwise the straight oil didn't spray good enough to burn very well.
 

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Here is the link to the insulation, and heating package we are putting in our shop........... http://www.thermaldesign.com/ ........This is your best bet the HVAC units are under accessories then energy craft HVAC......They will take your shop specs recommend insulation then a HVAC setup. It also comes with ceiling fans. The radiant heat sucks because if you pull a truck in to work on it it warms the top of the truck, but it's cold on the floor.
 

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im getting in late on this conversation but someone is going to read this again. what if you rented one of those big carbide concrete saws and cut trenches in old floor lay down pipe lay rebar on top for later line location and poured new layer cement over? im no contractor or pro just a farmer thinkin out loud. concrete is expensive where i live and there are alot of buildings outthere that could benifit from floor heat but not a complete new floor
 

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Use propane, natural gas, or elelctric overhead radiant. If one were to put new hot water system on top of old slab you need to consider what loads you are going to put on top of it. Thin concrete and flexible hose won't cut it. Saw cuts will fragment the concrete like a cut cake. My 2 cents.
 

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We built a 64x72 shop last spring and put a geo-thermal unit (ground source) in it. It works great. The highest electric bill i had last winter was about $125. A bargain when it is 5*F outside. Plus the A.C. is nice too.
 

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Bringin up AC is an excellent point. A well insulated shed can develop humidity problems during the summer and while AC may seem a luxury it controls humidity very effectively. We have a closed loop geothermal system in the farm house, an open loop in the old shop, and a propane boiler in the new shed all feeding floor systems. On extremely hot days if you open the new shed and let any hot air in the cold floor will cool the air down after the door is shut and you will get floor condensation. The equipment stored in there also gets condensation so that should be a consideration too. The old shop gets condensation on the windows sometimes just as any house will on extremely hot and humid days, but is drasticly better than the new shed on the same days.
 

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been looking for heat solution for 75'x75'x18 shop, Im thinking of a Thermo cycler, implement dealer put them in, looks and sounds awesome. one unit, one wall exaust, 3 to 4 degrees from floor to ceiling no ceiling fans or tubes every where, any one have one of these units? They look really simple yet have a computer controlled thermostat so you can ajust the temp according to when your working. I think the price is high but I havent priced tube radiant. 15000 installed. Dealer intown has put them in many city shops and large comm. warehouses. Equip dealer got rid of oil buners and radiants for these units and the mechanics love them. They run on lp, nat gas or fuel oil.
 

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Good blown in insulation and radiant heat would be pretty cheap and easy to do. We have a 60x100 and it runs on 500 gallons of propane a year.
 

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How about using one of thoese carbide crack cutting machines that highways use to router out cracks on the cement highway . Then fill the groove with grout instead of tar after putting the heat tube in . Could be a b***h of a job though as the re-bar might not always be in the right location IE - too high . I think that using a couple of propane unit heaters would be the easiest and cheapest solution for you .
 
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