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Hi

Locally we seem to have a lot of Sieve Bushings that fail.
The original parts seem the last for about 4 years but after that we are lucky to get two years out of a set. Always change all bushings at a time but some seem to dry rot and cause a failure. Hours of use doesn't seem to matter.

Does this happen anywhere else?

Maxie
 

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Check your shoe drive cam and slip clucth/big pulley hub. The origonals were made with casted holes and would pound out causing play in the drive allowing the shoe to bang at each end of its stroke. Also make sure your shoe is at mid stroke before you tighten the bushing bolts.
 

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Check the pins on the shaker arms on each side for wear. I would replace the needle bearings on each side takes four of them.
 

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Every night before parking the machine, I spin the seperator to get the bushings in mid stroke for sitting over the night. I make extra sure to do this anytime the machine will sit for extended periods, like over winter.

Washing the machine and not letting it dry well before storage will also reduce the life of the bushings. (not to mention other components) Water will get trapped in small crevases and if you google anything about water and rubber, you'll find water is not good for rubber components. After washing, make sure the machine can sit and dry and then run the machine for a while to warm things up before storage.

Lots of folks, if not most that i know of, tend to replace one arms bushings at a time and re-install the arm hoping that that way they dont have to deal with washers and shims. If you only replace one or two bushings in mid season, that will work ok, but if you replace all the bushings at a sitting during the seasonal maintainence, take'm all out and then just deal with the washers and shims. It will make the entire shaker system much more reliable. This way you can insure the pans and rails are centered properly and shimmed to hold them completely relaxed.

One other thing is the bolts that hold the main bushing on the drive arm. I make sure those bolts go all the way through both the arm and flat bar bracket with the shoulder of the bolt. Then put a washer on behind the nut to insure it can tighten and cut off the rest of the threads. This way there is bolt shoulder through the entire drive arms mounting. Otherwise there is only shoulder through part of it and smaller diameter, weaker, threads through the flat bar bracket hole.

IMO, JM2cents, etc.
 

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I love how case has built axial flows for 30 years and never figured out how to build a shaker system that works. And by the looks of things they left it the same on the new X088 series.

Make sure all the washers are in the right places. If you need to measure the inside because of lost some washers the service manual tells you how to do it. Check your sieve rails to make sure they aren't cracked too. Also check your chaffer because they'll crack out sometimes too. If you don't have the cast iron arm supports for the drive arms (the arm that mounts to the side of the combine with needle bearings), get them because they keep the system from flexing.

I know a mechanic that did 6 combines last year just during harvest with shaker systems in various states of destruction. It happens lots of other places in the world. Anywhere a Case combine runs I imagine.
 

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I could see doing it over winter but overnight?
Wow, picky.

Don

Well, maybe, but the way I see it, it only takes about 3 or 4 seconds to do and I like to go up and open the engine compartment doors anyway to look for hot spots and any other problems I may need to address the following morning. The centering of the bushings is only a small part of that time, so I may as well do it.
 

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The problem with your combine is internal contact between the chaffer and shoe assemblies and the inside of the combine. The chaffer rail front corners hit the housing on the forward stroke and the sides of the rails hit the corners of the auger bed on the back stroke. The shoe hits the tailings auger cover on the forward stroke and the frame on the back stroke. These contact points are built in from factory. ALL CLEANING SYSTEM PROBLEMS COME FROM THIS INTERNAL CONTACT! The cast supports will fix nothing and will create more problems. The Cleaning System Repair Kit is the only repair for this very common problem. Contact me at 701-755-3326 or 701-629-1469 Heartland Repair Service PO Box 22 Ross ND 58776 Thanks Gordon
 

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Stergiman an others probably solved most replaced bushing problems. Reason they should be installed mid way is that way there is only half the twist they need to absorb in full stroke of sieves.Other suggestions were also good an i remember instructions from Case a6 days calling for belts to be loosened over winter.
 

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Hey Gordon:

So how much longer (hours) do you claim your kit adds to bushing life? Say if normally we change them every 1000-1500 hrs how much longer are you claiming? Do you have any references?

Yes I see where my shoe hangar is rubbing on the rear of the tailings trough. My chaffer sieve broke in the rear a few weeks ago too. --Jed
 
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