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I switched from 3/8" id lines to 1/4" lines yesterday hoping to reduce stop start times and the old lines were shakey at best.

The internet (and MaxQuip, good guys by the way) says small lines only frost up when they are plugged.

Mine are frosted after the first 10 minutes from the secondary manifold outlets down at 110 lbs actual. I lifted out and there is a lot of liquid and a fair vapour out of the openers.
I switched fields and dropped rate to 80 lbs actual and now frost is from primary 3-way splitter all the way to the ground.

I have a 3-run contintal splitter and 3- 11 run mvd continetal secondary manifolds. Running a micro-trak nh3500 cooler and it has frost on the bottom like the manual says it should?

Just not sure as I (and maxquip) thought there would be no frost on lines at all unless they were plugged?

The primary has 3- 1" lines feeding the secondaries. Would it help if I reduced them to 3/4"?

I just shut down as a tire rubbed through a 1" line because I screwed up replumbing the lines so I'm having a beer and may be thinking to much.

With a proper system where should the frost be?

Thanks
 

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Are you sure they said they souldn't frost up? Seems wrong to me. I'm not familiar with that system but would only assume the principals would still apply to the properties of NH3. The pressure in the tank is way higher than it would ever be possible in a line and it's the pressure that keeps the tank from frosting up. We don't use NH3 anymore, but the only time a line didn't frost up was when it was plugged or it was about 35 above.
 

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Um yeah. Any pressure reducing system is going to frost up.

Whereas a pumping or pressure increasing system there won’t be frost and when you see frost you have a plugged line if it’s still flowing a little.
 

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If its cold and humid our lines will frost up a bit, but 90% of the time they stay unfrosted. They don't get that real thick frost on them either when they frost up, at least nothing like the bigger lines
 

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Your lines shouldn’t frost up. What is your drill width and Nh3 spacing and I’ll try help you out. Are your 1/4” lines 1/4” OD or ID?
 

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I guess I will find this out myself as I installed the small lines this yr as well. The ports are smaller than the hose coming from the manifolds I noticed screwing the fittings in. There will be a pressure drop into the lines, but definitely a lot less of a drop than to 1/2" lines. According to Pegg services who does piles of kit installs this is a far better set up. My son works there and has installed a pile of kits and says it is a better way to go. It sure cleans up the frame mess with all the lines being small. Time will tell. A couple days minimum before the coulters hit the ground. Peas first.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Your lines shouldn’t frost up. What is your drill width and Nh3 spacing and I’ll try help you out. Are your 1/4” lines 1/4” OD or ID?
The lines are 1/4" OD and 0.170"ID.
12" spacing and 33' wide. It isnt the thick frost like the larger lines and disappears in minutes when I stop (+4C).

Thanks
 

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they frost up becasue they are cold. the higher the RH in the air will make it worse. When that warmer air with high RH (water vapour) comes in contact with the cold line, the water vapour freezes on th eline, same as an air conditioner line in your vehicle that frosts up.
 

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Um yeah. Any pressure reducing system is going to frost up.

Whereas a pumping or pressure increasing system there won’t be frost and when you see frost you have a plugged line if it’s still flowing a little.
This is the correct answer. Maybe the maxquip guys think you have one of their pumps?

Anybody using NH3 needs to understand how that stuff works and it's properties, probably not safe if you don't!:frown:
 

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The lines are 1/4" OD and 0.170"ID.
12" spacing and 33' wide. It isnt the thick frost like the larger lines and disappears in minutes when I stop (+4C).

Thanks[/QUOTE]

You have the right lines for your toolbar and nicely balanced with 3 - 11 port manifolds. Yes, you may see a bit of frosting at times but shouldn’t be of much significance. At least that’s the case with my Raven. Unless Micro-trac is doing something different.

I would recommend going smaller than 1” on your 3 primary lines though. Especially if your doing variable rate NH3. Much quicker response time. Don’t be fooled because your rate controller shows you your increased or decreased rate quickly. It’s only showing you what it’s adding into your already fully charged lines. Your guages from your toolbar will tell the real story. With 11’ per section, id say even 3/4” are to big. 5/8” would be about right and would get you to about 110 lb at 6 mph. 1/2” would get you to about 85 - 90 at 6 mph.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The lines are 1/4" OD and 0.170"ID.
12" spacing and 33' wide. It isnt the thick frost like the larger lines and disappears in minutes when I stop (+4C).

Thanks
You have the right lines for your toolbar and nicely balanced with 3 - 11 port manifolds. Yes, you may see a bit of frosting at times but shouldn’t be of much significance. At least that’s the case with my Raven. Unless Micro-trac is doing something different.

I would recommend going smaller than 1” on your 3 primary lines though. Especially if your doing variable rate NH3. Much quicker response time. Don’t be fooled because your rate controller shows you your increased or decreased rate quickly. It’s only showing you what it’s adding into your already fully charged lines. Your guages from your toolbar will tell the real story. With 11’ per section, id say even 3/4” are to big. 5/8” would be about right and would get you to about 110 lb at 6 mph. 1/2” would get you to about 85 - 90 at 6 mph.[/QUOTE]

Thanks, I understand why the lines frost but didn't understand why some guys say frost and some say no frost with the smaller lines.
I will look at getting fittings and 5/8 hose today. The small lines sure clean everything up and route nicely.
Again, thanks for your useful and informative response
 

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I switched from 3/8" id lines to 1/4" lines yesterday hoping to reduce stop start times and the old lines were shakey at best.

The internet (and MaxQuip, good guys by the way) says small lines only frost up when they are plugged.

Mine are frosted after the first 10 minutes from the secondary manifold outlets down at 110 lbs actual. I lifted out and there is a lot of liquid and a fair vapour out of the openers.
I switched fields and dropped rate to 80 lbs actual and now frost is from primary 3-way splitter all the way to the ground.

I have a 3-run contintal splitter and 3- 11 run mvd continetal secondary manifolds. Running a micro-trak nh3500 cooler and it has frost on the bottom like the manual says it should?

Just not sure as I (and maxquip) thought there would be no frost on lines at all unless they were plugged?

The primary has 3- 1" lines feeding the secondaries. Would it help if I reduced them to 3/4"?

I just shut down as a tire rubbed through a 1" line because I screwed up replumbing the lines so I'm having a beer and may be thinking to much.

With a proper system where should the frost be?

Thanks
Everything is correct that you have there, it is a humidity and colder than SIN issue. When temps get warmer it will go away but at say a smaller rate it might show a bit.

Yes the Pump would be 100% frost free all the time as we are compressing it all the way down to the opener.

Brent
 
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