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Hello again,

I posted some pics of us out combining soybeans on this site last fall. Well, after I posted those pics we ended up getting a week long rain event that saturated many of our fields. We were lucky that a local John Deere dealer had just sold a used 9750sts with RWD to a farmer in a hilly area that did not want or need the rear wheel drive. The RWD on that combine was compatible with our 07 9760sts, so we made a deal with the dealer. Within 3 days they picked up both of our combines and put the RWD and his rear tires and rims onto our combine and returned the machines to each of us. It worked out really well for us. We saved a lot of money and the RWD came in very handy during harvest.

I have included many pics of us out harvesting soybeans in one of our waterlogged fields. I was amazed by how well the RWD worked. By simply having the rear tires help propel the combine, we greatly reduced field rutting. I was actually surprised how small the ruts were that we left considering how wet it was. We turned off the RWD occasionally to see what would happen. When we did the front tires would start to slip excessively and the combine would begin is sink making the ruts larger. Overall the RWD was a good investment for last years harvest.

I hope you enjoy the pictures.







 

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The 2cd pic is what I call DROWNING the combine ( letting the cut bar slip below SEA level) Hate to do that but have experienced it, yuck! stop and let her dry out.........
 

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I've heard of 485 Lexion 'bines skimming/cutting beans just above the water line but never a machine cutting IN the water. I don't see HOW you made that work for ANY amount of time.
 

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I accidently cut some wheat under sea level, BAD mistake! I was cleaning top and bottom sieves for a while by hand.
Hope its better for ya next year.
Have a good one,
Chris
 

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Everytime you guys post pics of harvesting in the fall with mini lakes in the middle of the field and there you go right throught the middle of it, it blows my mind. We harvest July-August when it is at least 90 degrees or higher. Lets just say that the only water you'll find out there is in my water jug. Im assuming that those soybeans arent exactly dried out. It amazes me what you can run through a machine. Oh yeah and great pics!!!!

Matt
 

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Nice pics. 1 out of 3 harvests seem to be like that here in Manitoba, Canada. How's the Hydraflex in water? Some say with the pressure set right it'll glide over water.
 

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Even though I'm back in Ireland now, I still have nightmares(seriously) about soybeans. Where I was in ND there are tonnes of granite rocks, If we happened to cut a field that hadn't been rolled it just made for a headache. Those granite rocks are so hard they make mince meat out of the insides of a combine if you didn't see them and the rock trap didnt detect them. I'd say it was challenging enough cutting beans in those wet conditions. +1 for the pics!
 

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Cutting in standing water is no big deal if you know what you are doing. Seems like every year we end up having some under water. Time to cut means time to cut, water or no water.

I'll bet his moisture wasn't much higher than it normally would be.

I just can't imagine not having a mudhog. I know they are expensive but I still like having one. In fact I wouldn't buy a combine without one.
 

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Quote:Mud Hog is a rear axle assembly and basically it's a RWD heavy duty axle, usually on tracks if I'm not mistaken.

Never seen one on tracks..

Mud Hog is a name brand for a hydraulic rear wheel assist.

My eyes were opened in the harvest of 2000 when I was on the wheat harvest. Saw lots of things that were new to me. Some of you guys need to get out of your area and see some new things too. Alex, you work for a Deere dealer right? How could you not know what a mud hog is?
 

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It never rains in NW Ks... no just never honestly seen one or even wondered about one beyond being a mudhog.

For some reason I was thinking there was a RWA rearend that was driven courtesy a track setup?
 

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Pretty sure that they are the standard brand of rear assist. There are a few others making them also. Gilcrest is another.
 

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In my neck of the woods the rear wheel assist is absolutely necessary for keeping a combine on a side-hill. Even with a leveling system when you are on a hill that has the combine leaning downhill the driven rear axle helps to keep the back end stuck on the hill.

just make sure that you don't leave them on when you head down a steep decline the combine will start to hop due to the fact that the front tires and rear tires are not the same diameter.
 

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Quote:Cutting in standing water is no big deal if you know what you are doing. Seems like every year we end up having some under water. Time to cut means time to cut, water or no water.


Yes, I can agree with that, Riceman. The water factor is agiven in rice, even with drained fields. I think your combines are rather used t it, but over here in wheat, a normally dry crop, it does not feed or even thresh well when really damp, let alone completely waterlogged!



Quote:In my neck of the woods the rear wheel assist is absolutely necessary for keeping a combine on a side-hill.
......just make sure that you don't leave them on when you head down a steep decline the combine will start to hop due to the fact that the front tires and rear tires are not the same diameter.


On some those Palouse country slopes up to 45 degrees or grades exceeding 48 percent, I would think that it is especially dangerous for any combine to begin to bounce. That split-second loss of stability, could mean the end of the line for the machine and possibly the man, too.


I had not noticed any RWA or "4 wheel drive" before on the older hillsiders, such as the '02 Deeres or 453 IH's. Did I just overlook something there?
 

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deere uses polain hydralic motors for there rwd units. out of sturtevant.wi. and deere hydros.to push oil. and all the combines in our area have them to. i like pics just wouldn't want to be the one with the screwdriver digging the chaffer out the next morn. that sucks!!! just need to have good operator that know what they are doing and you wouldn't have that water in head!!!
 
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