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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
High guys,
I'm new here and am from the UK, it all makes interesting reading and so i thought I'd show you a bit of our kit designed specifically for European conditions.


This is a NH TF 78. The TF range of combines are rotaries, but do not have the traditional longitudanal rotors, but a horizontal one going accross. The TF range was introduced in theearly 1980s after the early TRs were unsuccessful in dealing with damp straw.


Another view, direct cutting canola. This machine has a 24ft cut and 360hp.

Here is something a bit more familiar, a NH CR9080 at a demonstartion. Think this is the same as a 9070 in NA but with more power. This machine has a 30ft head, with variable knife distances.
 

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we never saw the TF's in Australia to my knowledge (and thats not that great so I may be wrong) but am aware of them. Would I be right in saying that these had two clean grain elevators - one on each side?? or was it two returns elevators??

The pics from behind are interesting, showing the straw discharge from two seperate areas.

Jono
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm pretty sure they weren't available in Aus, they don't like dry brittle straw as it breaks up too much and overloads the seives and so I would think it would be terrible in your part of the world.
Jono, they have two returns elevators. As for the two seperate choppers that is down to the final threshing mechanism. After being sent through a number of traditional drums the crop is split into two flows (hence twin flow) as it goes round a final drum. This drum has vanes on it which pulls the crop to the outside as it goes round and so as it leaves the machine it has to go through seperate choppers on either side. This final area is hwere the main difference is with the convential TXs, the rest of the internals are pretty similar, bar the engine which has more power.

They were fairly popular in this country, but they had reached the output limit with this machine. To go on higher they would have to go wider, which is not possible as it is already a very wide machine and our narrow roads. This is why NH has moved back to the more traditional rotors in its European combines, which after more development are more than suitable for our conditions. It has to be said though, that these machines are still far higher output than any wlaker machine which feel like they're stuck in 1st gear!

Here a couple more pics:

 

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As I remember from pics I've seen, the rotor behind the cylinder and beater was kind of like a gleaner rotor that worked the material both ways to each side of the machine resulting in discharge out each side. I think the Versatile trans axial used somewhat of a similar sideways movement of the straw etc. Must have been a real monster in the field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It was, we always struggle to keep the bloody stuff standing, as we put chicken manure down each year which is like rocket fuel. These photos are of the headlands and as you can see some has gone flat in these areas due to the double dosage it has had. Think the yield was somewhere around 1.4t/acre or 3.4t/hectare, which won't break any records but is still above average.
 

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Hello,


http://bidougoere.free.fr/NewHolland/tf40'/tf40'.htm (copy and paste the link to make it work)

You will find here a lot of informations on the first TF combine. As you can see, first combine have a Mercedes V6 engine. I have seen a Tf44 with 17500 hours (and still in work, and brand new condition) and some have more than 8-10000 hours. Un-breakable combines, simply...

To explain, the TF have a drum and concave, a rear beater, after they have a transversal separator (like on conventionnal New holland 8080) and after they have a very big axial separator, and two ejectors and staw choppers.

You can send a "Merci" to this guy, bidougoer[email protected] because pictures are coming from him.
 

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That is quite the design. It would be something to see work. How does the straw quality compare to a rotary? Do they leave longer straw like a conventional?
 

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We ran a TF44 for many years. There are quite a few in New Zealand; most of them imported second hand from the UK, as was ours.

The TF44 was basically a five walker TX34 chassis with the same drum, beater and rotary separator. However instead of straw walkers it had a transverse rotor that took straw in the middle, divided it into two streams and wound it out to each end. It was then thrown back to two separate straw choppers (if fitted) on either side of the combine. The TF46 was based on the TX 36 chassis.

TF’s were harsher on the straw than walkers but no where near as harsh as an axial flow. It could be baled OK. The TF rotor was much more effective than walkers at removing grain from straw, particularly in barley. Capacity was therefore significantly greater.

The TF’s had approx 50% more power than the equivalent walker machine so as to utilize the extra separation capacity. We have recently swapped ours for a TX 66. It is 20% wider (1.56m drum versus 1.3m drum on the TF44) and has more capacity in wheat but, despite the wider drum, sieves etc has no more capacity in barley.

Americans raved over the self levelling riddles and the retracting fingers across the full width of the table auger on the CR’s when they first came out. The TF had these over 25 years ago.
 

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Quote:
Quote: This machine has a 30ft head, with variable knife distances.

willb
What do you mean by that.
Thanks.

Don


This may be totally wrong but what I think he's talking about is the cutterbar moves away and towards the header auger hydraulically. The feather sheets are made to slide under one another.

Our rigid rice headers we have down here are made with the cutterbar almost under the auger. Rice feeds so horrible and having the bar so close to the auger makes it feed 100% better than a regular rigid head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Quote:is it entirely necessary to take all the material in canola? ive only picked it up dry

Matt


Traditionally canola was swathed before harvest and then picked up dry. However, with this there are more risks from shedding and also it is more vulnerable to the weather. It is both quicker and easier to dessicate the crop before hand, however with our temperate climate it takes a long time before it completely dies, hence the green. We also try and only take in the bare minimum of material but we have pods to quite a low level and so it is neccesary.
 

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most likely like the lexion vario header. New Holland has what they call the Varifeed in Europe that has a movable cutterbar from the cab.

Massey also has something wild over there with belts like a pickup header right behind the cutterbar feeding the material into the auger. I think its a rapeseed thing. Its interesting to look on company websites in other parts of the world to see what kind of weird stuff there is out there.
 

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Quote:
Quote:is it entirely necessary to take all the material in canola? ive only picked it up dry

Matt


Traditionally canola was swathed before harvest and then picked up dry. However, with this there are more risks from shedding and also it is more vulnerable to the weather. It is both quicker and easier to dessicate the crop before hand, however with our temperate climate it takes a long time before it completely dies, hence the green. We also try and only take in the bare minimum of material but we have pods to quite a low level and so it is neccesary.

I think Canadian farmers would equate shedding and shattering? However, the rest of the explanation would confuse most Canadian farmers.
 
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