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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Guys,

Next year I have been thinking about planting some soybeans after our winter wheat harvest here in Northwest Oklahoma. I have a very broad question as far as soybean varities. In your guys opinion who has and what variety do you guys feel has the best drought/stress tolerance in soybeans? Another question I have is how many pounds of soybeans does one usually plant per acre, I will more than likely be using a grain drill. Any time, help and sugestions would be appreciated.

Thanks again,
JD105404T
 

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1 bu to 1.5 bu /ac or 60 lb to 90 lb/ac...60 lb in a bushel...this is bad info from W Canada but a starting point for your mind that gettin us 170 000 to 250 000 seeds per acre
 

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What you plan on planting the seeds with.. Late planted may require narrow rows, and higher populations.

Biggest thing is water.. No water no beans.

What kind of yield return are you expecting, what maturity range do you plan on planting?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey guys,

Thanks for the great information. I thought thats what the seeding rate might be. I have only planted soybeans once and that was about 5 years ago with my John Deere DR drill that all I had to do was.flip my cover around from the small side to the large side amd the only other thing I have really planted with it has been wheat. I believe it was a Sygenta variety that I planted toward the end of April, early May and the ground sat out all winter with nothing growing on it. I ended up harvesting the soybeans at the end of November. They averaged about 20 bushel to the acre wich they say was very good for dryland in our area and was some of the best in our area for that year. I believe that they have improved yields greatly since then though, a year ago we had producers in our area raising 30 to even a few 40 bushel yields, we had a very wet summer too. I would more than likely till the ground with a disk first and plant on 15 inch rows with either a hoe drill or disk drill. I have read that studies show soybeans yield better in narrower row spacing. I am not very familiar with maturity groups but I would like to find something that I could plant towards the end of June after wheat harvest and be able to harvest in October or November so I could plant it back to wheat. I was also wondering if you guys have ever windrowed soybeans and then thrashed them so you could get them out of the field earlier. I know what you mean as far as the water situation, thats why I was wondering what your guys thoughts were on who had some some of the best drought/stress tolerant soybeans nd what varitiey they might be. Again guys your time and help is always apprecited.

Thanks Again,
JD105404T
 

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Seeding rate can be converted from lbs. to approximate population or vice versa, most of the seed companies will have a chart on the bag that gives seeds per pound.

Don't know of anyone who rates soybean drought tolerance, in my area they do for corn but not beans since they won't use near as much water. Not sure if lowering population will help with water shortage issues but it could...

I don't know what region you are from so have no idea what the "normal" maturity range is for your area. Soys are day length sensitive and so will mature when they sense the time is right. The earlier the bean the longer the days would be when they "trigger" and ripen.
 

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for us we are moving away from soybeans, not all together but putting some of the soybean ground to small grains or hay. beans are not drought tolerant like corn in our area.
if we don't get a couple rains in august we are looking at 15-30 bushel beans, if we get some rains in august we can get 40+ beans.
 

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Well, In nw ok, I would guess that you can get away with a lot less population. I plant around 110000 seeds per acre, and have had very good luck at 90000, but you can't let it get less than 75000 or you can start loosing yield in NE Kansas. If I am reading you right, you plan on following the wheat combine with beans, then following the bean combine with wheat drill all in the same year? I do this, and it works ok, but the yields are less. I have tried many varieties, and maturities, and for double crop, I like the shorter seasons just as good, especially if you want to get back to wheat the same year. In our area, most people plant short 4's for double crop beans, but I have planted long 2's and have very good luck. on high yielding double crop years, I don't think the 2's will beat the long 3's, but most years they will do as good. If you have good residue 30 inch rows will do just as good in dry years, but I think narrow rows will help with weed pressure.

good luck
 

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We sell beans that are tough enough to survive in your area but if you are going after wheat you can't skimp on fertility you should apply several nutrients other than nitrogen in fall and early spring so some can get broke down and be available for the beans. Been in seed industry for a while and a good rule of thumb is when u take genetics that work well further north when you start moving them south failure is really common. I saw a double crop group 5.1 today that come from very southern ks after wheat that was titty tall and im 6 ft 1. it had some decent pods on it too. my best advice is watch genetics and nutrients especially in your stressful climate.
 
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