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Discussion Starter #1
A couple years ago I had a customer who had 2 2001 9750's and a 2004 9860 with high unload rate. Of course it drove the operators of the 9750's nuts that the 9860 could unload so much faster. They said I had to do something about it so I changed the unload drive sprockets on the 9750's from the factory 19 tooth to a 24 tooth, basically speeding it up 20%. They were very happy with the results and there have been no damaged parts from the modification, they just wear out chains about 1/3 faster. I make sure the vertical auger lower bearings and 90 degree gearbox in the elbow get greased more often and the chain tension is checked regularly. Since then I have done this simple mod to other 9750's, 9610's and 9600's and have had many happy customers. On a 9600/10 a 17 tooth sprocket is used so I install a 22 tooth. To change the sprocket I simply buy a $12 sprocket at the local ag parts store and get my machine shop cut the old sprocket off and weld the new one on for a cost of $30. Then just lengthen the chain accordingly (or cut a whole new one). I hope some of you will find this useful.
 

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Interesting. I would think the added wear will differ between crops and conditions. If you only do dry corn and not high moisture I bet there is way less wear with the added speed, just like on the rest of the machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Corn isn't that common around here and it rarely yields more than 140 bu/a so component wear isn't really an issue. It's mostly cereals and some canola up here in Canada.

Speaking of wear, after working on several machines this winter that came from the corn belt, 1000 sep hrs on a corn machine would compare to 2500 sep hrs on any machine from around here (Manitoba).
 

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Ive thought of doing this with my 9600s before but was concerned with the added wear factor as well. About how many of the walker machines have you done and what kind of conditions are the machines running in?
 

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Also every 9600 Ive seen other than rice models come with a 19 tooth sprocket, I cant see how adding three teeth to the system will really make a difference.
 

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interesting...

Do you know how much time is saved by unloading with the larger sprocket? Could someone go bigger than that if they could find one? say a 25 tooth...obviously the wear might be more, but for the time saved throughout the season, it might offset the cost of a new components.

it seems like our 9600 takes ages to unload compared to the 50/60 series machines....
 

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Interesting. Why would the wear be that much higher? The chain is not making as tight of a wrap. The auger is turning faster so the bearings and such are seeing more stress and heat, yes. The auger itself, well a turn of the auger is a certain amount of volume, so a given number of turns unloads the tank (within reason, maybe the efficiency gets worse at high speed). On the other hand, the tension on the chain would increase due to higher power, hmm, If you can unload on the go, and finish before you need to turn around, where is the savings?
 

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deerefixer, when you talk about the auger being timed, what do you mean? We have a 9510, last year we kept sheering the sheer bolt. would this have something to do with it and how do you check the timing? my dad doesn't even unload at full speed cuz he thinks it must be hard on it since it keeps breaking.
 

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We used to put a faster sprocket on all our small unloading systems. The chain made it a full season for us where the high unload rate does not make a full season. As far as I can remember we never had an issue with speeding up the augers. As for the high unload rate, we have never gotten through a season without something in the system breaking somewhere. In my opinion, the high unload rate may be going too slow, causing a bridging or walling of material, and thus requiring more torque to move the product. This stands to reason as nothing ever breaks at start up, usually when the tank is half empty.

I guess our reason for speeding it up was to help the cart out so that it could keep up a little easier.

Chad
 

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Thanks for that info. I emailed my dad that so that next time we have time we can take a look. But I'm sure a pic or 2 will also help.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
When you have 3 or 4 combines to one cart, the less time spent with each combine, the better. Also, drainage ditches are common here so the less time the cart spends under the auger, the less chance damage could happen when the combine dips into a ditch.
 
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