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Was wondering what your guys take is on spraying in wind. Was always told can spray up to 20-25km/hr wind. But how effective is it spraying anywhere over 15km/hr? Anyone have bad experiences or find it to not be all that bad and still do the job? Also curious about spraying for bugs, clearly a guy has to if it's bad enough but where's the line on whether you should spray or not. Have gone into fields and think the crop is done but been told it will still grow through it. Thanks!
 

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They say: you never get a second chance to make a first impression, I noticed your avatar......welcome.;)

It was 25km gusting 40km here this afternoon, that is too windy for me. If it was steady at 25 I could deal with that depending on what's down-wind.

If you can go slower and keep the booms down you can spray in some high wind with air-induction nozzles. Wheeled boom would be better for that. Honestly I have never noticed a poor job from spraying in the wind.

I have heard some guys say that when the bigger sloughs have white-caps they stop spraying...
 

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anything above 25 is kinda a no no, we think 15 is still do-able that's why we spray at night or in morning, mostly at night.
we somethimes go out in little higher winds when the wind is away from a neighbor, we then usually spray along the line and quite. just to make sure that next time when the wind changes we are 120ft away from his field.
hanging booms low works but you have to realise that your nozzle angle only works at a certain height.
for bugs if you have to spray, when windy add more water i know you will have more drift, but also higher change of hitting them.
 

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anything above 25 is kinda a no no, we think 15 is still do-able that's why we spray at night or in morning, mostly at night.
we somethimes go out in little higher winds when the wind is away from a neighbor, we then usually spray along the line and quite. just to make sure that next time when the wind changes we are 120ft away from his field.
hanging booms low works but you have to realise that your nozzle angle only works at a certain height.
for bugs if you have to spray, when windy add more water i know you will have more drift, but also higher change of hitting them.
Not sure where you farm at, but from my experience, night spraying and early morning when humidity is high and it's calm is a good time to be parked. This is also dependant on what you are spraying and what is around you
 

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Not all winds are created equal either. As mentioned a gusty wind causes more problems than a constant one. I've also noticed days that the tree tops were moving and it looked too windy, but very little was moving at ground level. Of course I've also seen the opposite when the tree tops looked good, but there was a lot of ground drift. How far you want to push it depends on how much you value the crop downwind.
 

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If we waited for 15kmh winds, we'd never turn a wheel. There are over 250 (soon to be over 500) wind turbines within 70km of us! If I have to push it I try to keep my boom low and droplets as large a possible for the job. Does mean some pretty low speeds with high water rates at times.
 

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If we waited for 15kmh winds, we'd never turn a wheel. There are over 250 (soon to be over 500) wind turbines within 70km of us! If I have to push it I try to keep my boom low and droplets as large a possible for the job. Does mean some pretty low speeds with high water rates at times.
Yeah, but high water rates to you might be low to others, what sort of rates you talking?
 

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rember that you will get more drift at lower winds thabn youi will high winds if condition are right that spray will hang in the air for awhile then drop the one and only time i had drift was at about a 5 k wind

today i sprayed my peas they needed 10 galloon for the oddessy the only ten gallon nozzels i had where older flat fan type man oh man night differance way more drift with them nozzels compared to bubble jet
 

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Depends a lot on your tip selection and pressure as well.
A good air induction tip is the biggest help on wind. Last year, due to sprayer breakdown, I had to use a loaner with cheapy flat fan tips. It wasn't even windy and the entire boom was wet and dripping the whole time. I never see that with air induction tips.
 

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Please correct my opinions if wrong.

My understanding is that with tips like ABJ -- you get reduced drift because the vast majority of droplets are similarly sized regardless of the wind speed -- for example.
Tests and Results | ABJ Agri Products | Brandon, Manitoba, Canada

Also -- if the wind is going W-->E -- if you spray perpendicular to the wind (N-->S & S-->N) -- the wave of water off the boom/nozzles will hang together much better than other directions. But if it is wicked windy and you have to spray headlands if you spray WITH the wind, and come back without spraying, and then paint 2-5 passes that way -- your risk of drift off the field is very low.

Agree with the guys who say that your riskiest spray conditions are in dead calm or very low wind conditions.

http://tpsalliance.org/assets/files/Thostenson-Inversions-TPSA-2012.pdf
 

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Please correct my opinions if wrong.
you get reduced drift because the vast majority of droplets are similarly sized regardless of the wind speed -- for example.
That is fairly true. Most drift reduction technologies (Air induction, closed chamber) will reign in the droplet spectrum to cut down a lot of the 'too small' and the 'too big' droplets.

Think of it this way:
Conventional Flat Fan Tip: Droplet sizes of 5-1000 microns (numbers are just a made up range)
That is a big range.

With air induction (ABJ) or closed chamber (Wilger), you are introducing turbulence as well as a pressure drop into the tip. The pressure drop creates bigger droplets, and the turbulence both consolidates the small droplets within the chamber (Think of them hitting eachother) and the 'too large' droplets are split up with the turbulence to make more USEFUL droplets.
So, effectively this could change the droplet size range to something more around the lines of 200-800 microns. Closed chamber (Wilger) has differing ways to adjust that droplet size range a little more (by adjusting pre-orifice sizes as well as the actually stainless tip orifice size), but its the same idea whether it changes the range to 150-700 microns or 300-900 microns.

That's essentially the difference between the two types of tips. (conventional vs. Drift-reduction)

So, when they say the droplets are more around the same size, it is more that the science is adjusting the droplets to be more meaningful to the actual applications. All of this 'science' is happening before the spray leaves the tip, so wind doesn't really have any effect on the droplets when they are formed.

Whether the wind shear cuts down droplets on their path to the crop is another story though.
 

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That is fairly true. Most drift reduction technologies (Air induction, closed chamber) will reign in the droplet spectrum to cut down a lot of the 'too small' and the 'too big' droplets.

Think of it this way:
Conventional Flat Fan Tip: Droplet sizes of 5-1000 microns (numbers are just a made up range)
That is a big range.

With air induction (ABJ) or closed chamber (Wilger), you are introducing turbulence as well as a pressure drop into the tip. The pressure drop creates bigger droplets, and the turbulence both consolidates the small droplets within the chamber (Think of them hitting eachother) and the 'too large' droplets are split up with the turbulence to make more USEFUL droplets.
So, effectively this could change the droplet size range to something more around the lines of 200-800 microns. Closed chamber (Wilger) has differing ways to adjust that droplet size range a little more (by adjusting pre-orifice sizes as well as the actually stainless tip orifice size), but its the same idea whether it changes the range to 150-700 microns or 300-900 microns.

That's essentially the difference between the two types of tips. (conventional vs. Drift-reduction)

So, when they say the droplets are more around the same size, it is more that the science is adjusting the droplets to be more meaningful to the actual applications. All of this 'science' is happening before the spray leaves the tip, so wind doesn't really have any effect on the droplets when they are formed.

Whether the wind shear cuts down droplets on their path to the crop is another story though.
It's just a pity all air induction nozzles are crap! Yes they stop drift but give **** coverage and droplet size. Just because you don't see any drift doesn't mean your hitting the target?

Take for example ryegrass, barley grass you get a better kill with low water rates 30L/ha - 50L/ha using a xr 110* flat fan @ 20km or less. Higher concentration of chemical in each droplet to break through the membrane and fines which will actually stick to a one leaf ryegrass.

Air induction medium to extra course droplet, higher water rates = water downed concentration & a droplet that may or more likely will not hit the target then roll off onto the ground. Higher water rates don't always equal better coverage.

So either you see no drift and most of it ends up on the ground or with xr's you see a bit of drift which can be mitigated by slowing drown dropping pressures slightly and most of it actually hits the target your aiming for.

Even in the teejet book nowhere does it say that air induction nozzles are better, rather they say the opposite. And in the back of the book it goes on to stipulate that air induction nozzles have been brought about only because of people suing each other in America & the UK.

As for science a lot of it has been forgotten about. Replaced by bullshit marketing and the fear of getting sued. A good operator will always get a better result out of xr's with little drift. It may be a good idea to try some water dye paper to see what your actually achieving with your nozzle selection.
 

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It's just a pity all air induction nozzles are crap! Yes they stop drift but give **** coverage and droplet size. Just because you don't see any drift doesn't mean your hitting the target?

Take for example ryegrass, barley grass you get a better kill with low water rates 30L/ha - 50L/ha using a xr 110* flat fan @ 20km or less. Higher concentration of chemical in each droplet to break through the membrane and fines which will actually stick to a one leaf ryegrass.

Air induction medium to extra course droplet, higher water rates = water downed concentration & a droplet that may or more likely will not hit the target then roll off onto the ground. Higher water rates don't always equal better coverage.

So either you see no drift and most of it ends up on the ground or with xr's you see a bit of drift which can be mitigated by slowing drown dropping pressures slightly and most of it actually hits the target your aiming for.

Even in the teejet book nowhere does it say that air induction nozzles are better, rather they say the opposite. And in the back of the book it goes on to stipulate that air induction nozzles have been brought about only because of people suing each other in America & the UK.

As for science a lot of it has been forgotten about. Replaced by bullshit marketing and the fear of getting sued. A good operator will always get a better result out of xr's with little drift. It may be a good idea to try some water dye paper to see what your actually achieving with your nozzle selection.
You are so full of S*&t i just cant tell you !
 

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NairibinFarms have you actually had XR's in the field with a set of Lechler AI or Bubblejets, because if you had you may change your opinion in a hurry. I have done the checks with water-sensitive paper and there is no comparison. The fines you get through an XR tip are atrocious and will cause drift way sooner. You would have a very narrow pressure band where it was acceptable in wind.

On the closed-chamber or orificed nozzles they are better than a standard flat fan but they do NOT compare to a good AI nozzle such as the Lechler. That is my biggest issue with the AIM system is that you have to run archaic nozzles with it. Now if you need AIM to run a 5-20mph speed range then that's fine but anyone that sprays 20mph isn't too concerned with getting the best job.:rolleyes:

Just noticed today that I got spray-drifted again......from an AIM sprayer of course.:(
 

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It's just a pity all air induction nozzles are crap! Yes they stop drift but give **** coverage and droplet size. Just because you don't see any drift doesn't mean your hitting the target?

Take for example ryegrass, barley grass you get a better kill with low water rates 30L/ha - 50L/ha using a xr 110* flat fan @ 20km or less. Higher concentration of chemical in each droplet to break through the membrane and fines which will actually stick to a one leaf ryegrass.

Air induction medium to extra course droplet, higher water rates = water downed concentration & a droplet that may or more likely will not hit the target then roll off onto the ground. Higher water rates don't always equal better coverage.

So either you see no drift and most of it ends up on the ground or with xr's you see a bit of drift which can be mitigated by slowing drown dropping pressures slightly and most of it actually hits the target your aiming for.

Even in the teejet book nowhere does it say that air induction nozzles are better, rather they say the opposite. And in the back of the book it goes on to stipulate that air induction nozzles have been brought about only because of people suing each other in America & the UK.

As for science a lot of it has been forgotten about. Replaced by bullshit marketing and the fear of getting sued. A good operator will always get a better result out of xr's with little drift. It may be a good idea to try some water dye paper to see what your actually achieving with your nozzle selection.
You need to use Ai twin Jets.we use 02(yellow) @ 7 ga /ac on a lot of herbicides with no problems.Great coverage with no resprays.Use mostly AI -06 for fungicides unless going deep into fern then go over to Hollow Cone
We have done the checks with dye paper. NO xr's on my sprayer.
 

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NairibinFarms have you actually had XR's in the field with a set of Lechler AI or Bubblejets, because if you had you may change your opinion in a hurry. I have done the checks with water-sensitive paper and there is no comparison. The fines you get through an XR tip are atrocious and will cause drift way sooner. You would have a very narrow pressure band where it was acceptable in wind.

On the closed-chamber or orificed nozzles they are better than a standard flat fan but they do NOT compare to a good AI nozzle such as the Lechler. That is my biggest issue with the AIM system is that you have to run archaic nozzles with it. Now if may need AIM to run a 5-20mph speed range then that's fine but anyone that sprays 20mph isn't too concerned with getting the best job.:rolleyes:

Just noticed today that I got spray-drifted again......from an AIM sprayer of course.:(

we need a like button on here
 
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