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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone straight cut oats here in SK? Are there problems with wind if left out there and it shells out? I have Souris and Triactor, the Souris is definitely a nice even height right now and should theoretically be possible. I will be desiccating anyway, but swathing some too as I want to save some seed. What do you guys think?
 

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We straight cut some oats every year. The only year we have had loss issues was in the big wind a couple years ago, lost 40-50 bu/acre. I prefer straight cutting oats as it seems to flow into the combine better than in a swath. If it rains it dries out much faster as well, if its a heavy oat swath they stay wet forever. We usually desiccate the oats 75% of the time when straight cutting.
 

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Straight cut all my oats. The ones I want for seed I will reglone or just let stand and the others I will hit with glyphosate. Like Wheatking said always seems to combine better than picking up a swath. That being said I also lost alot of oats to shelling in the wind we had two years ago they were ones I had not dessicated and left them for seed. I beleive I lost a third of a 110+ crop. Grow Orrin oats they are fairly short and stand well. The losses two years ago was more from the stalks being broke off in the wind than the oats acutually shellng.
 

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We have pre-harvested our Morgan oats with roundup for about the last 7 years.
All the advantages have been listed already (flows into combine better, swaths don't lay in mud if you get a 2005/2006 style monsoon)

One negative is the straw gets tough and you have to shut down earlier at night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Orrin and Morgan have been tried and that's what we're going away from. Morgans had too much disease. Orrin's are way too tall and lodges badly. Last two years Orrin's were 5.5+ feet tall if not flat on ground. Both yielded well though for us. I have the triactor and souris in same field and definitely a difference. Color, maturity, height, leave size and kernel count is all different. Souris has more tillers though. Not sure, I won't be deciding until it's in the bin.
 

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The only time we tried straight cutting oats was in 2012. Had a field with lots of wild oats, so we figured on leaving it and letting the wild ones shell out. Then the winds came. Figured we lost around 30 bu/ac. Haven't been brave enough to try again!

A neighbour does straight cut his and he says to keep an eye on them. 2-3 weeks after spraying, he could see his starting to sag a bit. Dry or tough, get in there to combine them!

Andrew
 

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Does anyone straight cut oats here in SK? Are there problems with wind if left out there and it shells out? I have Souris and Triactor, the Souris is definitely a nice even height right now and should theoretically be possible. I will be desiccating anyway, but swathing some too as I want to save some seed. What do you guys think?

I can't answer your question if you should try to straight cut some of your crop or not. I will share why Oats became a major crop where I've been involved, what we did and why they went out of favour a while back.

Everything was straight cut except for some marginal land of my own that I purposely took a lower risk on inputs and use a lower seeding rate because the soil type and topography likely can't produce the type of crop that suits straight cutting. Although any soil is capable if the high areas don't run out of moisture early.

On the better flatter land the idea was to fertilize just enough so that very little of the crop permanently lodges when it is green. However the majority of the straw will breakdown about 2/3 of the way up its length and fall in on itself in a tangled formation. In this case 50-60 lbs of nitrogen was enough. For the most part this stops the seeds from getting rattled around by the wind. This breakdown happens after desiccation that was done as early as reasonable. Sometimes they need to be cut at about 20 degrees different angle than the normal travel direction on no till fields to stop pressure points under the header from staying in one spot on the cutterbar.

We planted at about 100 lbs per acre. The only other factor that I can think of that I'm sure made it work well was in-row crowding. Using a single disc drill at 10 inch spacing the seeds were often actually on top of one another in the furrow. Perhaps that helped to keep the straw length short. I never seen them get overly tall, the broken down mat was usually 1-2 feet thick and was safe for a long time without much risk of mildew or shelling.

One fall when I was busy with other things the whole farm had 90 lbs of nitrogen shanked in. I was a little concerned that oats were going into a lot of that. We did straight cut them all but they had lodged green and the better soils in the fields were down about 1/3 on yield. It's likely the only time people didn't want to drive combines. It was all about 5 inches thick and mildewed.

Our favoured variety is Pinnacle but they are a tan coloured seed, so they don't often suit the horse market because they think they're heated.

I think we could grow some more, if we're careful, but I don't try to influence those kind of choices.
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