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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hypothetically:

If an operation was big enough to warrant 2 drills, could one be a disc and one a shank?

In theory I like the concept of the stripper header/disc drill system of farming, but at the size of most average farms using one drill in this area (7000+/- ac) the maintenance seems prohibitive as from what I’ve gleamed that is how many acres a disc drill on average covers before potentially needing discs and/or scrapers.

So what I am curious about is, if an operation is big enough to warrant two drills, will the stripper header system work if one is a disc and one a shank. If you stripped all cereals, and seeded your pulses with the disc into stripped cereal straw, then seeded the majority of your oil seeds and cereals into pulse and canola stubble that was cut with a conventional header, would that work? Would the stripped cereal stubble be broken down sufficiently by year two to get a bourgault or seed twin through it?
 

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What you are describing is pretty similar to what I do. I grow wheat, canola, & peas (all are fall seeded, plus some spring wheat from time to time) and I have a stripper header, a disc drill, and a hoe drill. I don't have two drills because I farm a lot of acres though, I have two drills because I have widely varying seeding conditions from field to field. I try to use the disc drill as much as possible, since it get better emergence with it (along with other reason). However following canola our seed zone moisture tends to be deeper, especially if its been a dry summer, that's when the hoe drill gets used since I can seed much deeper with it. At this point I have no problems seeding through the two year old stripped wheat stubble.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What you are describing is pretty similar to what I do. I grow wheat, canola, & peas (all are fall seeded, plus some spring wheat from time to time) and I have a stripper header, a disc drill, and a hoe drill. I don't have two drills because I farm a lot of acres though, I have two drills because I have widely varying seeding conditions from field to field. I try to use the disc drill as much as possible, since it get better emergence with it (along with other reason). However following canola our seed zone moisture tends to be deeper, especially if its been a dry summer, that's when the hoe drill gets used since I can seed much deeper with it. At this point I have no problems seeding through the two year old stripped wheat stubble.
Fall seeded canola and peas? That’s interesting. Where are you located? I’ve heard of the winter canola being developed in the northern states, but not peas.
 

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Fall seeded canola and peas? That’s interesting. Where are you located? I’ve heard of the winter canola being developed in the northern states, but not peas.
I farm in Eastern Washington State. Pretty much all peas grown here are winter peas. Spring seeded crops in general don't do as well here so spring peas never caught on.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I see, was in your general area custom combining about 15 years ago down around Plymouth but mostly only noticed winter wheat on the dry land.
 

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I see, was in your general area custom combining about 15 years ago down around Plymouth but mostly only noticed winter wheat on the dry land.
Yeah, peas and canola have only been in this area for less than 10 years now. Before that it was all wheat.
 
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