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Ooohhh Deere
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
It's not what you thought now is it!!!:D:D





There's usually some discussion about whether shelbournes can pick up or gather lodged wheat. Happened upon this 6 t/ha Durum pivot, one of many laying down this year................:mad:
As long as the ground is fairly level the stripper will strip 100% of it, and some dirt:eek: but losses can get up there abit.

Going the same way it's laying is the challenge. As it can't pick it up first. Losses are around 2-5% depending on how hard you want to push that rotor down onto the ground. Constant good Forward speed is the secret here to minimise losses. 4-5 kmh was achievable in these pics. 6-7kmh going into it heads first.
 

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Have you tried going perpendicular to it? I have found that sometimes going across it will make losses better.


Interestingly, when I get into rye and it is lodged, I get more losses when I am going against the lean (heads hitting 1st). I think it is because it takes in more straw when the rye is brittle so I overload the stripping rotor. I think that the huge amount of straw I take in actually overloads the auger then and keeps anymore from getting in. What happens is the straw sits on top of the auger instead of being pulled under.

Who would have guessed that in certain conditions I would need a full fingered auger in a stripper head???
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
What limited you to only 7 km?
The yellow reindeer.



That speed was for heads first lodging. After a broken sheer bolt, backed of abit to 6.

40ft draper It would be 4kmh, at best, both ways.

Client very specific about wheel tracks must follow sowing lines. This is spud ground and compaction is a major issue. Always harvest east to west and the spud rows are done north south.
 

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40ft draper It would be 4kmh, at best, both ways.
I would think the losses from a draper head would be just as bad in that situation, if not as bad on the head, the total losses (machine included) wouldn't be much different. You would have to use the reel to pick it up so shattering would occur - no doubt about it. Putting all the crop through the machine will induce more losses.
Big green monster been going OK Deon?
Heard they're pretty good with fuel ....... they love it. Is this the case? Got any litre per tonne figures as yet?
 

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I saw a photo of harvesting standing Canola with a stripper and the bloke thought losses were small.

I used to have one when I had a JD 9500 but we sold it when we upgraded to the STS 9760. I would look at getting another if it would harvest standing Canola.
 

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Got any litre per tonne figures as yet?
I'd be interested as well Rod and I can tell you I felt there was a halving of fuel consumption, roughly 14 to 7L/Ha and 1.8 to 2 L/T.

Even with the 780 the difference through threshing area is reduced likely over 80% at times but the biggest difference is the straw chopper not having to deal with the massive straw volume a semi lodged crop would have necessitated and the subsequent huge increase in MOG/G ratio.

But...I could not seed through it completely effectively.:(
It was in the highest straw volume in history perhaps mind you.

Say Rod, did you notice anything?;)
 

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I'd be interested as well Rod and I can tell you I felt there was a halving of fuel consumption, roughly 14 to 7L/Ha and 1.8 to 2 L/T.

Say Rod, did you notice anything?;)
Yep, don't ask me about gallons per bushel or bushels per acre, quarts per acre or raccoons per cotton-wood tree ........ Makes no sense to me at all.;)
 

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Looks like you are running pretty low, do they have skid shoes on those headers to keep from shoving the reel into the dirt and bending them? (Obviously you would still hit clods but as for digging...)

One of those pictures looks about what canning pea stems look like after a pea combine stripper head has been over them.
 

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I runa 20' RVS Shelbourne in Rice. I have to pick up a LOT of downed rice, especially this 2014 harvest. Put the hood all the way down, and the header all the way down until the skids are sliding across the dirt, going with the direction that the crop laid down. Can get 90% of the grain. Trying to go against the crop (heads in first) and rotor speed is a big problem, tough to keep the rotor off the buzzer. Going sideways, coming across the crop on an angle doesn't work either, too much straw comes into the header and plugs it up.

Standing crop with perfect conditions is where the strippers shine. With my 9610 I can harvest TWICE as much rice in one day compared to if I was running a draper conventional header.

The down side is when the crop is down, they are just not designed to take that much abuse. THe RVS and CVS heads have that stupid dual shiv drive system and those shivs will get real hot in downed rice, plus everything is expensive when it comes to Shelbourne. On top of that, plan on doing more maintenance to the clean grain side of the combine, since twice as much grain is going through it. But, thats offset by less wear to the cylinder and beater.

For next year I am going to have two headers, my RVS, and a draper header that I can swap back and forth, depending if the crop is all standing, or down.
 

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I runa 20' RVS Shelbourne in Rice. I have to pick up a LOT of downed rice, especially this 2014 harvest. Put the hood all the way down, and the header all the way down until the skids are sliding across the dirt, going with the direction that the crop laid down. Can get 90% of the grain. Trying to go against the crop (heads in first) and rotor speed is a big problem, tough to keep the rotor off the buzzer. Going sideways, coming across the crop on an angle doesn't work either, too much straw comes into the header and plugs it up.

Standing crop with perfect conditions is where the strippers shine. With my 9610 I can harvest TWICE as much rice in one day compared to if I was running a draper conventional header.

The down side is when the crop is down, they are just not designed to take that much abuse. THe RVS and CVS heads have that stupid dual shiv drive system and those shivs will get real hot in downed rice, plus everything is expensive when it comes to Shelbourne. On top of that, plan on doing more maintenance to the clean grain side of the combine, since twice as much grain is going through it. But, thats offset by less wear to the cylinder and beater.

For next year I am going to have two headers, my RVS, and a draper header that I can swap back and forth, depending if the crop is all standing, or down.
Yes, the truth about strippers in tough conditions & the wear/cost factor. Nothing comes for free. Everyone around here - yes, it's rice country too - who uses, or has used a stripper head, will tell you exactly the same thing. They work very well in the "right" conditions but most people I know, have a draper as well. As for the wear factor, if you're on, or close to, the ground with a stripper, be well prepared to unload some serious cash in repairs. Also, the wear factor in not eliminated (as some claim) in the combine itself. It's just transferred to somewhere else in the machine.
Be all that as it is, strippers definitely have their place ..... but..... the costs are higher & the losses are more often than not, higher - especially when conditions for the stripper are not ideal.
Each to their own & everyone justifies their own position with their own particular preferences or circumstances as they see fit, but there is no way I, as a professional contract harvester, can afford to run a stripper. The losses would most definitely, loose me work ...... unless I buy the loss. Which means, reduce the harvesting price to account for the loss. Something I'm not prepared to do is reduce my professional approach & reputation of my work to account for the shortfalls of another.
Like I said: each to their own.
 

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Yes, the truth about strippers in tough conditions & the wear/cost factor. Nothing comes for free. Everyone around here - yes, it's rice country too - who uses, or has used a stripper head, will tell you exactly the same thing. They work very well in the "right" conditions but most people I know, have a draper as well. As for the wear factor, if you're on, or close to, the ground with a stripper, be well prepared to unload some serious cash in repairs. Also, the wear factor in not eliminated (as some claim) in the combine itself. It's just transferred to somewhere else in the machine.
Be all that as it is, strippers definitely have their place ..... but..... the costs are higher & the losses are more often than not, higher - especially when conditions for the stripper are not ideal.
Each to their own & everyone justifies their own position with their own particular preferences or circumstances as they see fit, but there is no way I, as a professional contract harvester, can afford to run a stripper. The losses would most definitely, loose me work ...... unless I buy the loss. Which means, reduce the harvesting price to account for the loss. Something I'm not prepared to do is reduce my professional approach & reputation of my work to account for the shortfalls of another.
Like I said: each to their own.
I don't have issues with grain loss, if that is what you are referring to. What rice the rotor knocks off, I figure is about the same amount a reel and sickle knocks off.

The other thing is fuel savings, over the course of a season I save a lot of fuel vs. buying/running a 2nd machine to do the same amount of acres per day.
 
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