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Discussion Starter #1
Hello there!

I'm in Australia and most of the time we burn all our wheat and barley stubbles before planting. But am wanting to shift to incorporating all the straw back into the soil. In Australia the types of machines for this are very limited. Was wondering what the best machines you guys use in the USA are?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Degelman Protill. Or any of the other high speed discs.

But why incorporate it as opposed to leaving it stand?
Sow on 10" spacings and the stubble load is far too great to sow through. Crops went 8 T to the hectare last season. Bailed all try to header trailings and still way to much to sow through. Also inhibits chemical success.
 

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Do you heavy harrow or can you. We can grow heavy straw loads here I don't know how they compare to those numbers most heavy harrow once sometimes twice when it's hot and dry then direct seed
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Do you heavy harrow or can you. We can grow heavy straw loads here I don't know how they compare to those numbers most heavy harrow once sometimes twice when it's hot and dry then direct seed
No I don't harrow mate, looking to turn it all back into the soil to build up.organic matter. As we don't run livestock I think it will be important in the long run.
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Where are you Nick to get 8t/ha last year? Coastal I guess.

Anyway, if your on the east coast let me know if you want to hire a speed tiller for a trial. Speed discs are the go for what you talking about. A mate of mine hires Degelman tillers. These are also the Cats meow.

A lot of irrigators here turn stubble in with speed discs, but you need some HP.
 

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What are you sowing with? If your not happy with the carrier your not going to be happy with any of the speed disc/vertical tillers as they all do essentially the same thing. Horsch terrano might mix it deeper into the profile, waltanna farms have a couple in Hamilton if your anywhere near there (assume you must be Western Vic with yields and conditions like that?) Otherwise muddy river ag will demo the horsch range. Otherwise a disc seeder and a seed terminator on your combine
 

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hey mate, yeh the dengleman looks awesome! Yeah I am in Southwest Vic had another good year (luckily enough) I would be keen to hire one for sure mate, but its probably a little late in the piece now as I have burnt all my stubbles and already sown 300ha of canola.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Am sowing with a MF cart and bar and I cant fault that mate, reason I dont like the stubble to be left as it ties up too much chemical and insects wreak havoc down here as well. I am looking to turn it all in over summer just after harvest or when ever we have a rain event.

and yeah I am only 40 mins from waltana farms
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What are you sowing with? If your not happy with the carrier your not going to be happy with any of the speed disc/vertical tillers as they all do essentially the same thing. Horsch terrano might mix it deeper into the profile, waltanna farms have a couple in Hamilton if your anywhere near there (assume you must be Western Vic with yields and conditions like that?) Otherwise muddy river ag will demo the horsch range. Otherwise a disc seeder and a seed terminator on your combine


yeh i am 35 mins from hamilton. I have a MF airseeder and cart (concord style bar) discs seeders are just too hit and miss down here in my part of the world.
 

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Selling it for something that can chop and incorporate better.
You need to do this at the combine. If combine chopper is working properly then cut low and you can run an ordinary cultivator over afterward and not make a mess. Good set of harrows helps too. I know what you are up against, this was over 7T...

 

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Discussion Starter #14
Do you heavy harrow or can you. We can grow heavy straw loads here I don't know how they compare to those numbers most heavy harrow once sometimes twice when it's hot and dry then direct seed
Yeh I use contractors for harvest and it's not cost effective top cut them off on the deck. If I can cut them half way down stem and then still incorporate would be ideal ???
 

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I hear there used to be this implement called a plow, turned everything all black :) In all seriousness though, around here the guys that no till and are trying to get around straw issues without burning usually use some combination of harrowing and chiseling in the fall and more harrowing in the spring. If you are looking to bury as much as possible though I would think a good heavy disc would do the trick.
 

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yeh i am 35 mins from hamilton. I have a MF airseeder and cart (concord style bar) discs seeders are just too hit and miss down here in my part of the world.
I'm about an hour West of Hamilton so I'm familiar with the problem, personally I run a Simba heavy disc Harrow which is sort of a cross between an offset and a speed tiller. Heavy stubble you can swing it round like an offset to bury things properly, light stubble canola etc you can swing it in like a speed tiller and just chop it into the surface. Anything else just creates a haven for slugs and snails. Unfortunately no one sells Simba gear out here anymore and they only come in smaller sizes.
 

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I have been intrigued by the Kelly Diamond Harrow that comes from your side of the pond...
 

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One way to deal with an 8t/ha stubble load is to bury it with a heavy disk, leave it to break down for a bit and then hit it with a kelly chain.

Another way is to forget the heavy disc and just smash it with a kelly disc chain. Pick a day when the stubble is nice and crisp and hit it hard so it breaks into pieces and lays flat against the dirt.
NB: If there's any moisture in the stubble this won't work so well, as the stubble will not bust up and instead it will lay over in waves and cause issues at sowing time.
 
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