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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We are running Sunnybrook cylinders with HHS concaves in our two 585s for the first season this year. With soybeans we had excellent results with smooth feeding and clean samples. With corn we have gotten good results overall but still would like some improvement. 180 bu/ac corn where we have problems.Throughput at least 2000 bph. With 20-22% moisture corn we were able to get down to 2.5% cracks and everything off the cob. As the corn got down to 18% we started struggling to get all the corn off the cobs in some fields, the cracks also went a bit higher closer to 5%. We need to run the cylinder 310 RPM or less to keep cracks in check and running it higher didn't help much for losses anyways. With cob diameter around 25mm we to had to run the concave considerably tight down to 18mm to prevent the losses from being ridiculously high, and still no broken cobs in the tank. I found the cobs were tough, one cob I checked I could bend into a complete U. I think part off it has to do with the field and variety, as the tough fields had a lot of broken stalks showing some abnormality. The interesting fact is when the dew set in the losses disappeared. I'm wondering if the cylinder goose feet hinder performance. We are doing everything we can to prevent cracks, feeder house slowed down according to ground speed, clean grain elevator chain tight, absolutely no corn in returns. We took a sample right out of the combine tank to make sure the cracks aren't created down the line. We are keeping all our corn for feed and want it in best quality possible. Any other ideas to improve performance?
The photos shows a case of bad losses with chopper dropped, and one of the problem fields.
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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It’s not already cracked or split on the stalk is it before the machine gets there?
 

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I am a bit familiar with the problem. I think by far the biggest issue is the spongy cob you're dealing with.

I dont think the goosefeet have a thing to do with it.

You could call precision farm parts and ask them. They can enlighten you about cylinder bars in corn.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It’s not already cracked or split on the stalk is it before the machine gets there?
Thats a good question, but I don't think so. The cracked kernels we find generally have their top broken off.

You could call precision farm parts and ask them. They can enlighten you about cylinder bars in corn.
Yes, but would they be knowledgeable on a Sunnybrook?
 

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Delectric Sunnybrook and Precision farm parts are competitors to each other. I can guarantee you that precision will have nothing good to say about Sunnybrook.
 

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Delectric Sunnybrook and Precision farm parts are competitors to each other. I can guarantee you that precision will have nothing good to say about Sunnybrook.



Not true. Mike will tell you why his (PFP) parts are better in his opinion, but I have talked to him extensively about Sunnybrook parts and he has never had anything bad to say about them and will tell you they are better than stock - just not as good as his.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
We moved to a new great looking field today with 18% moisture, and are getting near zero losses and cracks <2%:49: Two loads we tested were 1.2%. An expert who consults with setting combines for premium crops says with Lexions you can get cracks down to 1.5% in corn not sure at which moisture. BTW we check for cracks with a light tester, that will likely show a higher percent cracks. Seems to me the fields with broken stalks have a weak variety and/or deficiency, and that will show up in the ear as well. So I think Sunnybrook performance in corn is equal to stock or better. Another thing I've noticed we have fewer cob bits in grain tank than we used to have with our stock cylinder and N18, below 20%moisture the amounts of cob bits are select few..
 

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Ooohhh Deere
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Varieties and or weather damaged corn can make a massive difference in the sample as you might already know. Years ago I was doing some weather damaged corn and couldn’t get the splits below 8-10%. Farmer tearing his hair out. I was cursing the S690. Upon inspection in the field 1/3 of the kernels in the cob were already cracked still on the stalk.

Went to another job, same variety but not weather affected. Straight away .5% splits and easy clean Harvesting. Just how it should be.
 

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Damaged kernels could also come from something in the head or feeder, especially if it is the very top of the kernel broken off.


I had one field I did a few weeks back that had cracks on the sides of the kernels still on the cob, often with a tiny spot of mold growing on the exposed starch. Just wasn't a good year for corn in our area.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Damaged kernels could also come from something in the head or feeder, especially if it is the very top of the kernel broken off.
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That is something I suspect as well, I once stopped the header full and taking a quick look I didn't find anything of importance, but I'll check again and take a closer look.
 

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Make sure you arent getting the damage from the head cross auger/stripper plate. Generally that where I have that type of damage the most. Also are you running r/b aps?


What happens if you push the machine harder? 2000bph is light for a 585.

Kinda like running an unloading auger half full.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Make sure you arent getting the damage from the head cross auger/stripper plate. Generally that where I have that type of damage the most.
Thanks I'll take a close look.



What happens if you push the machine harder? 2000bph is light for a 585.
Yes, APS and concave round bar.
In the fields where we had losses it made no difference going faster. About the same amount of losses. Just looking as they hardly shelled at the deck plates, I believe the kernels were holding tight to the cob.
We are running two combines with one grain cart and going at a pace so either one unloads into grain cart. I know that sounds overkill but to match equal capacity with one combine we'd have to go crazy fast, definitely not sensible with our terrain, and 12 row heads.
In normal looking fields we had excellent results with splits and losses. since we use a light tester to check for splits, that probably makes the percentage higher than typical estimates.
 

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The PFP bar is flat or nearly flat on its face. It is much more of a typical rasp bar.
The SB bar is peaked on top in the middle, like a house roof. I think it is an old Gleaner concept.

The PFP bar is a bit more rounded on its leading edge. The possible benefit here is corn cobs and other is more likely to get threshed going through the rasp bar.
The SB bar has a pretty blunt face. It is more like a gear pump, as it is referred to, possibly conveying product around the concave quicker, using the leading face to propel product. Possibly requiring more rpms to get corn threshed.

The PFP drum has a more swept back knuckle that the rasp bar bolts to. This also gets crop to the outside, forcing it under the rasp at the concave.
The SB drum has a straighter knuckle. Again, propels crop through the machine quicker, gear pump as they refer to it.

The PFP rasp uses 1/2 or 5/8" bolts to hold the rasp to the drum. They are recessed into the rasp.
The SB rasp uses a 5/16" allen bolt recessed in the rasp bar, with a single rasp bar missing along the line of each bolt.

The PFP rasp appears to be reversible, but they don't seem to be advertised as such.
The SB is advertised as being reversible...good luck removing the allen bolts without heating them.

The PFP rasp bar is slightly taller.
The SB rasp bar, you can guess...


I recently had APS drum damage that did damage to our SB cylinder bars. I replaced the bars with PFP bars. So far working good in soybeans.
 
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