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Very,very good.It looks like the Gleaner guys took some marketing lessons at John Deere and come up with an even better strategy,instead of releasing "spy pics or five second spy movies" they produce a nice video to get people excited.
 

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A little off topic but after watching the video, is the soil compaction issue in Kansas really that bad with combines, grain carts, trucks, etc. and is it a widespread issue or is it localized problem?
 

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Agree excellent vids and embracing the 'net' to involve the customer. Well done to the Gleaner team, praise where praise is due.
 

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As far as compaction, last 2 falls here in Iowa have been wet, with early snow and little frost, compaction is really showing this summer in cart paths ect, and if you look close you can see combine compaction also.
 

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Compaction is always an issue if your soil type has any clay content at all. My area has all soil types and except for areas with blow sand,
compaction is a factor. Fortunately we do not have any blow sand on our farm.
 

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Nicely done video, but, when the S-7 operator states he had ticket after ticket showing #1 quality wheat, nearly a perfect sample, what did the other combines in the same field produce? How were their samples graded? I guess really no direct comparisons to other makes were made other than compaction, and even that wasn't clearly defined model brand to model brand. Tire size is the greatest reducer of compaction and no comparison was made to that. And did they really explain the big negative of the narrow feederhouse? I am sure if it was wider, even more crop mat could feed naturally into the cylinder.
Not real informative, but great combine shots and music.
 

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Did you miss the part about the feederhouse being choked down 25 inches?? that was a pretty direct comparison. They are probably just waiting till summers over to release all results. gleaner has everybody beat in design by far and its so unique nobody can get close to it without being a fraud. Once I get a chance to demo a S7 or S6 I will make my own opinions as should everyone else.
 

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That was not an S7 operator, but a custom harvester, Mel Gossen, who runs around 9 R76's. He was talking about how his R76's had the best samples of anyone else.
 

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That is good quality stuff video wise, but as to grain quality perhaps I just don't understand the grading system.
Grading in Canada is not affected by what any combine will or will not do to the sample.
If it's cracked and/or unthreshed that just becomes dockage,
but a 1 is still a 1 or a 2 a 2 and so on.
So to me the fact the wheat grades a 1 means they were harvesting wheat that was a 1...and that's all.
Lots of factors can be up for discussion, but not grade, by what a combine does or does not do.

Don
 

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Well I'll be damed. I thought that was the S-7 operator talking about how good his sample graded.
And yes, I saw the pinch point sketches when comparing the feederhouse size, but nothing was said about the distance the crop mat in the S-7 needed to be pulled within the feederhouse before threshing vs competition.
Did anyone else notice in several of the shots, the S-7 was not taking a full cut, but hogging over 3 or 4 foot? Was the headed a bit too wide for the combine capability?
I sure hope more factual comparisons will come up that I can sink my teeth into instead of this nice sales department slick shots and slick talk.
 

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The feedhouse argument that is constantly used from gleaner is nice -if you live in a 2 dimensional world. However, when the Case (or Deere) feedhouse dumps into the rotor, the rotor provides a large height as well as multiple entry points for the crop to flow. It looks obvious how much better a gleaner is with a diagram from the top like in the video, but when the fact that we live in a 3 dimension world is taken into account, it really isn't a big deal at all.
 

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That was the head of Gossen harvesting, they had the origonal S-7 in their group. If it's fed even distance to the rotor doesn't matter. You also notice the back chain is fixed position, so regardless of header height, feed angle is constant.
 

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I believe that the samples he is talking about were from the Ingalls KS area. The particular grain elevator they haul to has a Kansas finest wheat program it requires your wheat to be 60 lb. or greater, .3% foreign materiel or less, and 12% moisture or less. The grain is ran through a grading machine that seems to be the industry standard in this area, then the FM and the grain is weighed separate to determine the % of dockage. At this particular grain company a premium is paid for KS finest at most they just dock you when their standards are not met.
 

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We are releasing the benchmark data to our dealers before anyone else. They deserve first dibs. As far as Andy's claim that the Deere and Case feeding system does not compress the crop mat, we can debate all day if everyone already has there heals dug in. And easy test would be to open one up and look at the wear points. And, yes, we've already done this.

What is not so hard to debate is that the other combines force the crop mat to change direction. The mat goes from moving straight into the machine and is shifted to moving side to side. Our crop mat moves straight in, around the rotor and out. We keep the angle of feed constant because it ensures the rotor is always fed at the best angle. I would think that's obvious.

To Greenpower's point, the S7 can easily handle the whole 40ft dynaflex. I'll let some of the people on the forum attest to that. As far as the distance to feed into the rotor, I'd say that is far less of a concern than a beater system that essentially must stuff and then shear off portions of the crop mat before reaching the rotor.

Get ready to sink your teeth in GreenPower, but you better bring some hot sauce. I've seen the data personally and its going to leave a really bad taste in your mouth.
 

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The feedhouse argument that is constantly used from gleaner is nice -if you live in a 2 dimensional world. However, when the Case (or Deere) feedhouse dumps into the rotor, the rotor provides a large height as well as multiple entry points for the crop to flow. It looks obvious how much better a gleaner is with a diagram from the top like in the video, but when the fact that we live in a 3 dimension world is taken into account, it really isn't a big deal at all.
Gonna take a step back,get a 9xxx Deere conventional with a wide feeder house, and a L series Gleaner with a narrower feeder house, run them over 10,000 acres and compare bar wear, the wear pattern will show the advantage of narrow and full.
 

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I have been in the super 7 and have seen the capacity in 70+ bu. wheat. It is impressive, we were cutting at dusk the humidity was high and we never heard any rumbling from the rotor. I can say on this day in this condition feeder house capacity was not even a thought. We had the engine monitor showing 100% load capacity and never did the feeder plug. We did however come over the top of a terrace into some green wheat that was even thicker and got too low on the backside and pluged the header augar but that backed right out and on we went. As far as width of feedhouse vs. width of rotor vs. outside circumference of inlet questions I can tell you what I know and what others have told me about competitive combines.

What I know-Massey/Gleaner A/Challenger/ (White design combine) the rotor turns opposite from CIH and Deere rotaries so the crop is pulled left to right sitting in the cab. If you look at the wear patterns in one of these combines you will find heavy wear in the center under the beater and on the right side of the inlet. You see little if any wear on the top or left. We have never replaced the top of an inlet tube on one of these machines and have several with the lower and the left fixed with AR plate. I’m not saying it can’t happen it just hasn’t happened here.

If you think about the crop being fed into an axial rotor the crop hitting the downward turning vane will be pulled to center and the center to the right and the right to the upper right with little being pulled onto the top. The wear patterns will indicate this as well. The interesting thing about this is that the majority of the crop is being pulled into the tightest part or pinch point of the concave. Where as in a transverse machine or conventional combine it is pulled into the wedge of the concave uniformly.

What I have been told-From a friend that has a combine parts manufacturing business is that the majority of the crop as much as 75% of it is fed through 25% of the rotor inlet. Consequently the majority of the wear is there to prove the theory. The difference is the wear on the Deere or the CIH is on the opposite side and slightly different patterning due to the difference in intake systems employed by the different manufacturers.

The main thing is both systems work and has led to some fine combine designs. There have been many improvements to the Gleaner feeding system over the last 3 or 4 years that have led us to this point. The Gleaner system while long the width is not an issue.

Bruce
 
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