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First year for me using exactapply on the JD. It does offer a lot more benefits than turn compensation.

What I like the most is you can set the pressure to the perfect pressure for conditions or droplet size and it stays there.
You can slow down as low as you want and the pressure is still stays at set point. High speed the same thing.
For pre-seed burn this year we went with 50 psi on a low drift nozzle with coarse droplet size. When windy or against a neighbour field we would lower to 30 psi.
The same nozzle can be set for for 70 psi or higher for medium droplet size when doing fungicides, or in crop spraying.

Individual nozzles are their own section control. Not that big of a deal for overlap, should see less leaf burn on some chemicals were you are overlapping 5 feet or more.

As far as breaking any, what I see is they should be more robust than the old JD setup.

The cost is stupid high I agree. Long term reliability yet to be determined.
 

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LTK I think your totally missing the value in PWM for most farms.
1. Turn Compensation
2. 20in section control
3. Sprayer pressure control

Anyone that sprays 400000-800000$ of chemical a yr is going to get value out of 40-50k investment if they do a 2% better job over 5 years.
I am interested in how you determine a 2% "better job" and how that would return a $40-$50,000 investment. Perhaps the farms I spray are above average for field conditions. I can only go by anecdotal evidence which, as you know has limitations considering the HUGE variance between farms and farming areas. I'm certainly not saying that there in NO ROI for PWM. Not at all. Just that there isn't for my customers that I can figure. I could be missing something and if so would appreciate enlightenment. Always interested in improving that i am doing but I AM a numbers guy and assumptions and suppositions don't hold any sway. I need hard numbers.
 

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As far as breaking any, what I see is they should be more robust than the old JD setup.
Unless they have redesigned them recently, that is not so. I have been to many "sprayer clinics" at JD dealers and they alway promote the exact apply. I have look at the bodies and they have the exact same hinge as the standard bodies and it is ALWAYS the hinge that breaks. I suggested to Deere on several occasions that they redesign the bodies so that the hinge can be replaced separately in the event of a failure but, of course this is just the guys at the clinics so nobody with any pull.
 

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Unless they have redesigned them recently, that is not so. I have been to many "sprayer clinics" at JD dealers and they alway promote the exact apply. I have look at the bodies and they have the exact same hinge as the standard bodies and it is ALWAYS the hinge that breaks. I suggested to Deere on several occasions that they redesign the bodies so that the hinge can be replaced separately in the event of a failure but, of course this is just the guys at the clinics so nobody with any pull.
The Booms on a R sprayer protect the nozzle body way better then earlier models. On are 6th year with a R series and don’t believe we have broke any bodies yet.
 

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I am interested in how you determine a 2% "better job" and how that would return a $40-$50,000 investment. Perhaps the farms I spray are above average for field conditions. I can only go by anecdotal evidence which, as you know has limitations considering the HUGE variance between farms and farming areas. I'm certainly not saying that there in NO ROI for PWM. Not at all. Just that there isn't for my customers that I can figure. I could be missing something and if so would appreciate enlightenment. Always interested in improving that i am doing but I AM a numbers guy and assumptions and suppositions don't hold any sway. I need hard numbers.
Being able to control pressure and hold it in the desired range at any speed allows you total control of droplet size and pattern. Being able to spray at 5mph all the way up to 18mph and hold pressure at say 40psi and have 20inch section control pays dividends in many ways.

LTK have you ever sprayed around a power pole and turned Canola yellow on inside half of the boom?(That yellow canola will yield less come harvest and costs a farmer money)

LTK have you ever sprayed odd shaped fields that aren’t perfectly square because I have a few and are exact apply saved use around 3% on those fields.

I know for fact on are farm we have cut spray acres by an average of 2% over conventional Deere 11 section controlled sprayer. And on my chemical bill that pays for the up front cost in 3+ years without counting other benefits.
 

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Being able to control pressure and hold it in the desired range at any speed allows you total control of droplet size and pattern. Being able to spray at 5mph all the way up to 18mph and hold pressure at say 40psi and have 20inch section control pays dividends in many ways.
I understand those characteristics of the system but still don;t understand where it pays actual dividends.

LTK have you ever sprayed around a power pole and turned Canola yellow on inside half of the boom?(That yellow canola will yield less come harvest and costs a farmer money)
I do have one field that I spray that has 2 power pole in it. While there are a PITA, I don;t recall ever seeing any crop damage around them and the guy that farms that field is a stickler for that sort of thing and would certainly have mentioned it if it happened. Having said that, I do have another customer that has a field that has a n arrow point at one end of one field and i HAVE noticed crop damage from where I do a part turn, stop, back up and complete my turn.

LTK have you ever sprayed odd shaped fields that aren’t perfectly square because I have a few and are exact apply saved use around 3% on those fields.
I have a few "puzzle pieces" but very few.

I know for fact on are farm we have cut spray acres by an average of 2% over conventional Deere 11 section controlled sprayer. And on my chemical bill that pays for the up front cost in 3+ years without counting other benefits.
This I don't get. While i get about 3 acres of overlap on a typical 1/4, at least half of that is from the kick on and kick offs from entering/exiting the headlands. That can't be avoided. The other half could be reduced with individual nozzle sections but I don;t know anyone that actually reduces their chem mix by 2% if they have PWM or adds 2% more if they don't for that overlap. 40 acres a case product is 4 cases per 1/4 whether it is 162 acres or 151 acres. The flow meters on sprayers can vary by more than 2%. Was spraying centurion today and i called the customer before my last fill and told him that I would need 3 1/2 cases for the last field, did the want me to split a case, load 1/2 case light or 1/2 case heavy. He said "use 4 cases, I don;t want any part jugs and heavier won't hurt".
 

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If your getting 3 extra acres on a quarter your getting 2% plus overlap. We might spray 2000-5000ac without changing chemical sometimes and always spray full loads till last tank load and 2% adds up over those acres and that’s my point I’m saving roughly 2% on chemical across farm.
 

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If your getting 3 extra acres on a quarter your getting 2% plus overlap. We might spray 2000-5000ac without changing chemical sometimes and always spray full loads till last tank load and 2% adds up over those acres and that’s my point I’m saving roughly 2% on chemical across farm.
Good point. Like I said, half of that overlap is kick on/kick offs so will happen with or without PWM but your comment is valid regarding the other half. Being custom I may change chemistries more often that a large farmer doing his/her own. While nothing said here will change my position on PWM for myself (I know my customers and I only have one that might see the value in it), I still enjoy discussing it as I am ALWAYS interested in anything to do with spraying and am always keen to learn new things even if they do not apply to me/my operation. I appreciate your taking the time to share your thoughts without getting offended by my questioning of them. My intention is never to offend but, rather, to learn. Thanks
 

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I don't see saving any chemical, just better chemical distribution. If the field is 160 acres, I load 160 times the rate. I have a 5 section 100' sprayer. I add 4% extra water to cover overspray. I do have a few fields where I add 5% due to convoluted borders. So most of the field gets sprayed at 96%, and a little bit at 192%.

Yes, I have a few areas where better distribution would be beneficial, more about the outside of the turn rather than the inside.
 

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My 854 Rogator is worth less than the pwm upgrade lol. My operating costs are cheap like borscht., Nice clean fields already. The bigger the boom the greater the speed difference between boom ends on any brand of machine when turning. A 145' boom would be insane. Back into any corner when doing the headland and problem solved. I thought of going with an aluminum 140' boom. My 9.5" wide skinnys only trample one seed row on 10" space now on 80'. With a huge boom crop loss would be extremely minimal. 2 seed rows over 140' would be 1.19%. With dividers on this can be even far less. If the wheel is in just the right place the crop is just bent not trampled. My 800 gallon tank and light Gator can run on 9.5" tires. These huge 1600 gallon machines just make a guy feel good not filling as often but yield no benefit IMO. Require way more power and bigger rubber to hold all that weight as well. More crop damage and more ruts from turning etc. Come look at my fields sprayed with a $35,000 machine and one sprayed with a $600,000 machine and see which is better. Come at desicating time and compare. Rider comfort is the only difference between any of these machines. $500,000 buys me one nice Motorhome and who is more comfortable now lol. Over 5000 hrs on my 854 and haven't touched a wheel motor or pump. Wore out 1 ez-pilot motor so far.
 

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It all depends on your logistical support system. For me an 800 gallon tank would double the time it takes to spray the same acres. I don't have an on-field nurse truck to make fill ups quick. If you've got a tank of water at the edge of the field and a fast mixing system, I don't think it matters what size tank you have when you can fill up in just a few minutes. But then you have to worry about moving it from field to field.

I just have one fill-up station on the farm. A large tank allows me to tank up for an entire field at a time. Currently using 1200 gallons and that's mostly okay. Now that Case is offering 1600 gallon tanks on the same frame, a lot of guys have stretched their tanks to 1600 gallons. I'm considering doing that as well. I don't often need that many gallons, but would be nice to have when I need it. I've seen a few Rogator tanks being stretched in the welding shop as well as Case and Deere tanks.
 

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I hear your predicament on no water truck. I have been using my old Dodge on a triple axle trailer with a triple axle bumper hitch since I got my sprayer. My son or I switch off hauling water or spraying when one of us gets bored. My truck has been doing this for yrs and keeps up fine. I have an excellent water supply from a fresh gravel pit with a spring. Water sample came back better for drinking than our town water lol. A 2 man system spraying is necessary in my operation. I only farm 2500 acres but do custom spraying and tried to stop but one customer refuses to buy a sprayer so I continue on his 1100 acres. I used to spray 6500 acres yearly from burn off to desicating with my sprayer. It owes me nothing but praise for the yrs of incredible service it has gave me. Wet yrs on fields end to end killed so many Deere around me and my old unit just keeps rolling and other than a few hydraulic hoses over the years it's bullet proof. A friend who farms runs Deere everything and has had 3-4 Deere far newer and nowhere nears the hrs I have and uses them til it fails in the field and trades it off on a newer one. He's got the green under wear too.
 

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I would find it hard without a water truck, with the water truck I get a helper and I don’t have to fold and 5 minute fills. Most of our land is less than 3 miles from our yards but we save a lot of hours on our sprayer and on a good day I’ve sprayed up to 1700 acres.
 

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Would be interesting to see how a custom operator with weedit would charge a farmer?
Custom operator would probably never own that system in western Canada, unless they get green on green working.
 

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Would be interesting to see how a custom operator with weedit would charge a farmer?
Custom operator would probably never own that system in western Canada, unless they get green on green working.
There has been talk of the local WeedIt dealership renting out a sprayer with a WeedIt. The problem is that the cost savings of using the WeedIt are eaten up by the rental costs. Since most people in my area do their own spraying, I think the same would apply to a custom operator with a WeedIt, it just doesn't offer any savings to the grower. Things may be different in other areas though.
 

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Would be interesting to see how a custom operator with weedit would charge a farmer?
Custom operator would probably never own that system in western Canada, unless they get green on green working.
It would be literally impossible for my operation. The customer supplies the chem and I see no way to know how much to mix and when you are long, what do I do with the left over if I have to change chemistries for the next customer??. I suppose you could use the weed for the first fields and do the last field conventionally if you are doing several for the same customer (Which IS usually the case). Back when round up was $40/litre a guy would find a way to work it out. At todays glyphosate prices, I don;t know. Most gut are using WAY more than they need now because it's cheap. Similar issue with them injection. I see the benefits don't see how it could be used for my operation.
 

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It all depends on your logistical support system. For me an 800 gallon tank would double the time it takes to spray the same acres. I don't have an on-field nurse truck to make fill ups quick. If you've got a tank of water at the edge of the field and a fast mixing system, I don't think it matters what size tank you have when you can fill up in just a few minutes. But then you have to worry about moving it from field to field.

I just have one fill-up station on the farm. A large tank allows me to tank up for an entire field at a time. Currently using 1200 gallons and that's mostly okay. Now that Case is offering 1600 gallon tanks on the same frame, a lot of guys have stretched their tanks to 1600 gallons. I'm considering doing that as well. I don't often need that many gallons, but would be nice to have when I need it. I've seen a few Rogator tanks being stretched in the welding shop as well as Case and Deere tanks.
I've been thinking of stretching my tank to 1600gal also. I heard the frame is the same on the new ones, is the suspension? Any frame problems on the new ones?
 
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