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I have not seen a factory 1600 sprayer in person yet but the salesman tells me nothing is changed on the sprayer except for maybe the automatic greasing system as with extra weight it's essential to adequately grease the suspension arms. As many know here already, dealers in Australia have been stretching tanks for many years on brand new sprayers under warranty. Apparently Case engineers spent some time down there and determined the frame is plenty strong, which is why they've decided to compete with John Deere and offer the 1600 gallon tank from the factory, which is simply a taller tank, just like a welding-shop stretched tank.

I know of no one running the factory 1600 gallon tank. It's an expensive option. But there are hundreds of stretched tanks running around in Australia and some in Canada. There've been no frame issues that I've heard of.
 

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I have not seen a factory 1600 sprayer in person yet but the salesman tells me nothing is changed on the sprayer except for maybe the automatic greasing system as with extra weight it's essential to adequately grease the suspension arms. As many know here already, dealers in Australia have been stretching tanks for many years on brand new sprayers under warranty. Apparently Case engineers spent some time down there and determined the frame is plenty strong, which is why they've decided to compete with John Deere and offer the 1600 gallon tank from the factory, which is simply a taller tank, just like a welding-shop stretched tank.

I know of no one running the factory 1600 gallon tank. It's an expensive option. But there are hundreds of stretched tanks running around in Australia and some in Canada. There've been no frame issues that I've heard of.
That is great news. I just switched to a 4420 from a pull type with a 1550gal tank and I'm really struggling with the smaller tank size. I know there is a place called Maxx cap near winnipeg that stretches tanks. I am in the US, so it might be easier to find someplace here.
 

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I have a 2500 ram diesel and a cheap triple axle bumper hitch trailer with a small chem handler on with a 2" Honda and a $1600 product pump for totes. 1300 imperial gallon tank Maybe in total 23G worth of stuff. I can fill my 800 gallon sprayer twice when full at 740 gallons at 9.25 gal/acre. A 1600 gal machine has a lot of money tied into it. Roading it to and from a water hole is just hrs that aren't justified. My 16 yr old can haul water with my set up. If you farm that much that you need a 1600 gallon sprayer why wouldn't you get a simple setup just to make life easy. Surely someone can be hired to haul water. I used to spray 15,800 acres a yr with my set up total with my rig. 80' boom. Now I just spray 10,000 with mennonites buying out land around me. Life is easy with these smaller acres with everything a guy does on his own farm over the summer. Many will say 80' boom? How can he dessicate with that lol. I have 230 skinnys. Just over 9" wide tires because of my light weight allowing me to run them. Thinking of a 135' aluminum boom but it is worth twice of what my sprayer is lol. It does make sense though over the long term. 18" of tramping over 135' is miniscule. Many times my crop isn't even driven on with 1 set of wheels with 10" spacing. I made my own divider for the front wheels which I bet 40% of the time the crop is just bent to the side and not under the tire track. Big heavy machines require big rubber and big frames to carry that weight. Let alone HP and fuel to push it around. I have 23" wide fat tires and crop is hardly affected spraying and bounce back up with ease in 4 days and can hardly notice where I went. The money spent to extend a tank etc just doesn't pencil for me with all the trade offs when that money could supply a portion of a simple trailer set up. Am I totally missing something here? How does this tank extending pay for itself? Obviously don't have hills where you farm.
 

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So you think I should hire an additional man for at least $20k a year, plus the cost of the tender, vs about $6500 to stretch the tank which will work nicely with my current setup? Like I said I have no interest in setting up a tender, or hiring someone to run it around the farm when a few more gallons on the sprayer makes it so one fill can easily do a field. Takes 5 or 10 minutes to drive from the fill up station to the field. A water tender would just be a waste of money for me. I fill as fast as I can open jugs and mix through the chem handler. Could be faster, but I've got enough speed there. I can get more economy and speed by investing in bulk handling equipment (totes, metering, etc), than by investing in a tender.

Different operations have different requirements. Since you've got a nice system worked out, the 800 works great for you. I'm sure if I did have a tender and someone to operate it I could get by with an 800 gallon tank also. But we're happy to have a larger tank. Some farms require 1600 or 2000 gallon sprayers and large tender trailers.

We have had 1600 gallon tanks on sprayers for decades and that's what we're used to and set up for and makes spraying a one-man operation. The self propelled has become essential to our operation doubling our speed, and we make do with the 1200 gallon tank, but stretching it would be really nice, which we'll do in a year or two.
 

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Same here. I have a lot of 160ac fields and find it very annoying and a huge time waste to have to leave the field and come back to do the last 40 acres. Then, move to the next field....drive right by the spray trailer... do I stop to top off or spray an 80 acre load on the next field?...then leave again without finishing the field and come back...and so on, and so on.

I have a large spray trailer. One of the best investments I've ever made. I move it to the farm I'm going to be spraying that day and spray out of it all day. 1-2miles drive distance max. Love it.

Don't get me wrong, I love my self propelled, but leaving a field before it's finished is getting old. I really don't get that much more done in a day over the pull type I had. 110' boom and 1550gal you can get some stuff done. Doubt you will see me pulling it around again though.
 

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We had a deere 4930 with stretched tank, have to different sprayers with 1200g tank. Definitely miss the bigger tank.
 

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Anyone like there aim command. I’m on the fence on it. Got a 3340 1000 gallon tank. Have the blue TT for 200 acres a fill. Gary for 160 acres and white for 80 acres a fill. I spray at 40 psi. And it seams I still get stripping. My pulse rate for the aim command is in the 65 to 75 range. Do I need to be higher and more psi?
blue my speed is 10 mph. Grey and white 14 mph. Can I better my self for what I’m doing?
Thanks.
 

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As you can see in the above chart a blue nozzle at 50 psi and 15 mph will give you 6.7 gpa. Most times I try to size my nozzles at least 70% duty cycle.
 

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I have a 2500 ram diesel and a cheap triple axle bumper hitch trailer with a small chem handler on with a 2" Honda and a $1600 product pump for totes. 1300 imperial gallon tank Maybe in total 23G worth of stuff. I can fill my 800 gallon sprayer twice when full at 740 gallons at 9.25 gal/acre. A 1600 gal machine has a lot of money tied into it. Roading it to and from a water hole is just hrs that aren't justified. My 16 yr old can haul water with my set up. If you farm that much that you need a 1600 gallon sprayer why wouldn't you get a simple setup just to make life easy. Surely someone can be hired to haul water. I used to spray 15,800 acres a yr with my set up total with my rig. 80' boom. Now I just spray 10,000 with mennonites buying out land around me. Life is easy with these smaller acres with everything a guy does on his own farm over the summer. Many will say 80' boom? How can he dessicate with that lol. I have 230 skinnys. Just over 9" wide tires because of my light weight allowing me to run them. Thinking of a 135' aluminum boom but it is worth twice of what my sprayer is lol. It does make sense though over the long term. 18" of tramping over 135' is miniscule. Many times my crop isn't even driven on with 1 set of wheels with 10" spacing. I made my own divider for the front wheels which I bet 40% of the time the crop is just bent to the side and not under the tire track. Big heavy machines require big rubber and big frames to carry that weight. Let alone HP and fuel to push it around. I have 23" wide fat tires and crop is hardly affected spraying and bounce back up with ease in 4 days and can hardly notice where I went. The money spent to extend a tank etc just doesn't pencil for me with all the trade offs when that money could supply a portion of a simple trailer set up. Am I totally missing something here? How does this tank extending pay for itself? Obviously don't have hills where you farm.
Something I have learned by following these farm forums is that what works perfect for one operation does not work well of another. There are so many variables that one has to be set up for THEIR situation and while there is often something to be gleaned from how others operate, it is wrong to assume that how we do it is the best in every situation. Boom width is a PERFECT example. My booms are custom made to 125'. Why not the standard 120' or 132'?, because with these widths, when spraying fields that are 1/2 mile wide, you finish at the wrong end and have to come back empty. With the extra 5', I eliminate the last partial pass and finish at the same end I started saving me 2 passes, one spraying and one deadheading. My 125' are effectively the same efficiency as the 132' without the extra length and nozzles because the 132' only save one spraying pass but leave you at the wrong end and you have to come back empty erasing that one pass savings. So, should everyone be running 125' rather than 120'?. Nope. If you are spraying row crops, 125' doesn't work. Tank size. If you are spraying the vast majority at 5GPA and you have your supplies at the field, no point on going big on the tank. OTOH, if you spray a lot at 20GPA and/or your land is all pretty close to home so filling in the yard is only a minor inconvenience, then a 1600 or even 2000 gallon tank would pay dividends. It sounds like you have a good system FOR YOU but nothing you do would work for me just like nothing I do would likely work as well for you. Different situation call for different solutions. It's great IMO, that people share what works for them so others may be able to pick out something that may work for their operation but there is no "one size fits all" solution.
 

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Anyone like there aim command. I’m on the fence on it. Got a 3340 1000 gallon tank. Have the blue TT for 200 acres a fill. Gary for 160 acres and white for 80 acres a fill. I spray at 40 psi. And it seams I still get stripping. My pulse rate for the aim command is in the 65 to 75 range. Do I need to be higher and more psi?
blue my speed is 10 mph. Grey and white 14 mph. Can I better my self for what I’m doing?
Thanks.
I am on my first year with Aim and I'm on the fence about it. I love the wide speed ranges I am able to travel, but the driftable fines produced by this system has me concerned. I have tried several nozzles already and I'm sick of spending money. Used to just buy some AI nozzles and go spray..
 

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It's kind of like a grain cart scenario whether you need one or not I guess. Many say no and drive the combine to the trucks. Others say no they can't be without one. Spraying in moss or in wet conditions like my area often gets, weight is your biggest enemy. Hills as well require a pile of HP. Access to clean water and distance to that water is a huge factor too. I have a premium source of water that is blue like that you see in the mountains. A fresh gravel pit with a spring below. The water tested better than the towns water after treatment lol. There have been yrs I have custom sprayed for guys where I am driving through water 15% of the time and a heavy machine would just sink or grenade from the extra torque put on the pumps and wheel motors. Many sprayers that endure this by custom operators gets traded fast. One guy here buried his 1600 gallon Deere in a moss area full. Tractors tried to pull him out with no success. The cat and with the winch was successful. A hundred yards of ruts and full stick ahead with the cat in front. That machine is owned by somebody else now. Got traded quick with low hrs. It was creaking and croaking all the way the way out as a group of spectators watched. The guy who operated it didn't want to unload and drag a pile of hose and a trailer to offload. Time is money lol. Rare here to get a 160 acre field. Always a run or small bluff or low area it seems. It rains here and there is forest, not the occasional tree. My scenario is different than many I guess and building a bigger tank than the machine was designed for to accommodate every area it may endure is worthy i guess if it stays where it wont break.
 

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I think if everyone had a 2000gal tank, 160’ boom, pwm, and 2 10,000gal tankers. Than that should cover all scenarios. 😂
 

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Anyone like there aim command. I’m on the fence on it. Got a 3340 1000 gallon tank. Have the blue TT for 200 acres a fill. Gary for 160 acres and white for 80 acres a fill. I spray at 40 psi. And it seams I still get stripping. My pulse rate for the aim command is in the 65 to 75 range. Do I need to be higher and more psi?
blue my speed is 10 mph. Grey and white 14 mph. Can I better my self for what I’m doing?
Thanks.
This is probably best put in its own separate topic. Feel free to start one and I'll move my comment there. I prefer to keep my duty cycle above 70% whenever possible. In the mid 90s ideally. I think my system uses 15 Hz for the cycle time. Newer systems go faster which might be better. Depending on the wind, chemical type, etc, I typically spray from 25 to 60 psi. This pressure range gives me the droplet size I think I want at the water rates and speeds I want. The other day I had to spray in 30 kph winds, so I did everything at 25 psi 90% duty cycle and I feel like it didn't drift too badly and coverage was pretty good. @Licensed to kill talks about the wind washing the chemicals on the plants a situation like this.

I'm not sure what chemicals you're seeing striping with, but certainly doing what it takes to increase your duty cycle will help. That often means lowing your pressure, though. In this case you might want to bring both your duty cycle and pressure up by switching to smaller nozzles. Increasing pressure will increase coverage and produce smaller droplets which will mix in the air a bit more. You might want to speak more to the herbicides and water volumes you are using.
 

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It's kind of like a grain cart scenario whether you need one or not I guess. Many say no and drive the combine to the trucks. Others say no they can't be without one. Spraying in moss or in wet conditions like my area often gets, weight is your biggest enemy. Hills as well require a pile of HP. Access to clean water and distance to that water is a huge factor too. I have a premium source of water that is blue like that you see in the mountains. A fresh gravel pit with a spring below. The water tested better than the towns water after treatment lol. There have been yrs I have custom sprayed for guys where I am driving through water 15% of the time and a heavy machine would just sink or grenade from the extra torque put on the pumps and wheel motors. Many sprayers that endure this by custom operators gets traded fast. One guy here buried his 1600 gallon Deere in a moss area full. Tractors tried to pull him out with no success. The cat and with the winch was successful. A hundred yards of ruts and full stick ahead with the cat in front. That machine is owned by somebody else now. Got traded quick with low hrs. It was creaking and croaking all the way the way out as a group of spectators watched. The guy who operated it didn't want to unload and drag a pile of hose and a trailer to offload. Time is money lol. Rare here to get a 160 acre field. Always a run or small bluff or low area it seems. It rains here and there is forest, not the occasional tree. My scenario is different than many I guess and building a bigger tank than the machine was designed for to accommodate every area it may endure is worthy i guess if it stays where it wont break.
Was just on another forum and saw a thread that started like this and thought of your posts, "2nd year running an 854 rogator, it's been dependable but is underpowered in our hills, especially when it's somewhat wet.". The guy is considering a Deere to solve these issues.
 

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Anyone like there aim command. I’m on the fence on it. Got a 3340 1000 gallon tank. Have the blue TT for 200 acres a fill. Gary for 160 acres and white for 80 acres a fill. I spray at 40 psi. And it seams I still get stripping. My pulse rate for the aim command is in the 65 to 75 range. Do I need to be higher and more psi?
blue my speed is 10 mph. Grey and white 14 mph. Can I better my self for what I’m doing?
Thanks.
Slip,

For an 110-03 (blue) nozzle size for a 5 gal/acre (1000gal/200 acre fills) at 10MPH, on 20" spacing, you'd be on the lower end of the duty cycle, so I for sure wouldn't go bigger.

162792

This would be a pretty close comparitive to a TT -03, so you see the pressure, speed range and duty cycle there. Pretty much if you are going above 40PSI and going any slower than 10mph, you could definitely be seeing checkerboarding patterns there. It'd be worse at higher pressures (as pump works harder/higher pressure, so your duty cycle eases off to keep the rate the same).

As far as the drift side of things, I've been finding a fair bit of guys who have been transitioning to PWM systems and missing the gap of 'the nozzles they used to spray with' and new ones used with PWM. By all means, there are definitely as coarse and coarser nozzles than air induction tips out there, it's just a matter of sizing it to your spray conditions.

But, all in all for a 5 gal nozzle @ 10mph, I'd probably be looking at the coarsest -02 or -025 nozzle you can find, as I'm guessing that might be in the realm of what you'd be doing for burnoff/glyphosate work. With smaller nozzles, you often have to go to the Nth degree to get your spray where you want it.

I've notice a lot of guys using a conventional flat fan + PWM thinking they'd be able to control drift as good as before, which wouldn't be the case. PWM can only 'reduce drift' bydoing two things:
1. Keeping pressure low whenever you need it to be low. (as long as nozzle is sized so it can spray at like 30PSI)
2. Using a nominally larger nozzle size and tailoring down the flow rate (with duty cycle), as larger nozzles will always be coarser than finer nozzles (as same nozzle type/etc)

But, all in all, the checkerboarding is a serious enough issue and definitely leaves you choked up as you'd expect better.

So, in your situation,

5 Gal/Acre rate: Look at a 110-02 or 110-025 size (depending on whether you required lower rates every or higher rates/faster speeds).

6.25 Gal/Acre rate: The 110-03 would be 'OK' for it at higher pressure, but you'd have to keep 45PSI as your minimum pressure otherwise you run out of 'room' on your nozzle, so you'd be under-rating it.

162793



For 12.5 Gal/Acre rate, you'd likely be looking at a 110-06 (grey) size, at a bit of a higher pressure. I'd maybe look at that one better than your white one (110-08) as there is kind of a shift for that large of a jump in volume that stuff starts getting fairly coarse, fairly quickly. Again, you'd have both on hand, so if you were just wanting to spray at 40PSI for it, you'd be using your white ones.

162794



Anyways, seems you are a fair bit larger on your 5 gal and 6.25 gal nozzles (they are likely sized moreso if you were travelling like 15-18mph).

I would probably suggest using the Tip Wizard app at least for nozzle sizing, as it does do all the calculating for duty cycle, AS WELL as it includes the pressure drop factor through the solenoid.

Anyways, like Torriem said, if you wanted to start a different post on it, can give you a bit more room to ask any other questions or clear stuff up for you.
 
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