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Thinking of trying a 1/2 of yellow peas next year, have never grown them before.

Going on to relatively heavy land on wheat stubble

Whats the advantage to green or yellow peas?

How do they seed off a disc drill? Running an older 1895 drill

Fertilizer requirements?

TIA
 

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Yellow peas are easier to market in my opinion. Just about any elevator will take them. Greens are worth more, but it's harder to get good color quality which buyers are often looking for.

All we've ever put with peas is phosphate. Been a while since we grew them so I can't remember how much we put down, maybe 40#/ac actual P total, with 15 or 20 of it in the seed row, the rest beside. Don't have a disc drill so can't comment on that part.

Peas certainly get going faster if your field is blacker, but we've grown them zero till in wheat stubble before and they did alright. You can plant them pretty early as they take the frost fairly easily. Although I've found they do pretty well for me when planted later also. Maybe waiting for it to be warmer and drier actually helps in terms of root rot. Just speculation.
 

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I single shoot my peas with 50 pounds of pho’s. Can seed early. Roll your land. Flex header perferd but ridge works ok.
They don’t handle the drought to well
 
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First things people seed here. They don't mind snow on them. Use a good inoculant. Fertilizer, not convinced it matters. Fert does help them green up faster. I have not seen a yield gain. They will remove phos so maybe put some down to replace what they use?

Yellow have a much bigger, less special, market than green. Yellow is yellow. Green, every variety is different and you don't blend them. I was told this is because they often fry them and each pea will cook different when blended? I am no expert and have never grown green peas. They go into human food products. That should say a lot. Yellow are usually ground for flour or pet food.
This year yellow seem to be priced similar to green or higher around here.
 

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Saw above that peas do not like drought. Well they do not stand being in water at all either so depending on how heavy/wet your land is this may be a consideration. Also, if you land really heavy, black and can get wet in Fall around harvest that makes them a little less fun to harvest. I have both yellow/green pea seed ready and whichever one is highest price is one I go with as my insurance coverage is the same for both(very good). The green pea mkt is certainly smaller and lost a somewhat important player(WA grain) this Spring so that may tilt things. Yellow peas may be bit easier to harvest and have less grading considerations as well. Have to pay attn to your TKW to get seeding rate right. Generally green peas bigger than yellow so seed cost bit of a consideration. I think the pea mkt will do some real catch up this Winter so I like the way you are thinking. Peas are a great crop. The more everybody hates them the more I like them.
 

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Peas are considered a dryland crop here in southern Alberta. They need moisture, though, but not too much. And they don't like heat either. Well-drained soil works best.

They are a great crop if you can figure out how to keep to an 8 year rotation. Nothing else will stop aphanomyces root rot, which you'll get eventually if you grow peas over a long period of time. I think it took about 10-15 years to start seeing it on our farm when we started bringing peas into the rotation. Several fields saw peas only three times before we had root rot problems on them. This is with a 4 year rotation.
 

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Bah looking for a dry land crop grow lentils. I have yet to see a field not green
 

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Depending on where the OP is, his usual rainfall might be well beyond what we get here on our dryland cropland. Lentils don't do so well with more than our normal precipitation. On some years like this one I can get away with growing lentils under irrigation, but normally not. Peas can definitely handle more moisture, and need more moisture, than lentils.
 

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Lentils are the only thing that look good out here. Interested to know how they yield.
 

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I tried Lentils in 1985, crop Ins. wouldn't insure them as they were an unknown. I got hailed out. Grew yellow peas from 1992-2007, swore I would never grow them again unless I had access to a land roller. I now mostly have cows, they can be trying as well at times.

Yellows won't lose their color as easily as greens from rains. All I ever did was innoculate and put down 50 lbs of 11-51-00, always liked seeding into pea stubble.
 

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Good point about the land roller! Sometimes peas stay standing up and you can cut them just about like wheat. But sometimes they go down and you have to scrape the ground. We roll all our pea and lentil ground. Some people roll right after seeding. We roll when the plants are a few inches tall. Doesn't hurt them at the right stage.

Just about everything causes green peas to lose their color. Too much rain at the wrong time, sunshine, etc. We used to grow them for a specialty market but it was very difficult to get the color they needed.
 

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Tried greens once never again. Everthing was wrong. Then the kicker was we had 500bu left over. Figured what the hell just haul them to elevator as feed peas. WRONG. Elevators won’t take them since there diff. Had a ***** of a time getting rid of them.
 

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Tried greens once never again. Everthing was wrong. Then the kicker was we had 500bu left over. Figured what the hell just haul them to elevator as feed peas. WRONG. Elevators won’t take them since there diff. Had a * of a time getting rid of them.
I’ve never understood that, feed peas are feed peas, right?!
Or, some of those “feed peas” actually get traded as yellows perhaps?
 

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I’ve never understood that, feed peas are feed peas, right?!
Or, some of those “feed peas” actually get traded as yellows perhaps?
They told me the greens were a deduction. Lol the funny thing was right after we grew them the market crashed. They went from 14 bucks to less then what yellows were worth.
I like to take credit for that
 
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