The Combine Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, my dad and I are now actively looking for a subsoiler. Just wondering everyone's opinions on them. (unbiased ??!!
) We have no idea on what's the best. We're looking for a straight-shanked with a opener foot on the bottom to try and break the hardpan. Just looking on tractorhouse, we liked the Case 2500, but they seemed kinda pricey.
Is it necessary/beneficial to have coulters on it? For residue or cutting open the soil? We farm in SW Saskatchewan, and if you need more info, look back on a previous thread I started.
I lack the ambition to type it all out again!
Also, wondering about hp requirements. We farm a sandy-loam soil, which pulls much easier than clay soils.

Any info/experience for this beginner is MUCH appreciated
!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
The only problem I saw with the 2500 DMI is the lack of a wearstrip on the shank. We went with a 4830 Krause inline ripper and couldn't have been happier. It has wearstrips which we need in our abrasive soils and after running this spring and some in the fall it has almost no wear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
We actually didn't buy a subsoiler from a major equipment company. At the time our local welder was making his own custom subsoilers. He did a great job on making it and it fits our operation perfectly. I don't know what your situation is or if this is even possible, but maybe a custom job is something that you might consider. I will say that it was a lot easier on the check book than any other brand of plow.


This is a pic of a Case subsoiler (i found on tractorhouse) to give you an idea of what ours looks like. Ours is pretty much the same with nine parabolic shanks but it has a normal tongue hitch in stead of a three-point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
283 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
We aren't looking to have a parabolic shank because we don't want to bring up the soil that's under our topsoil or any of the boulders we have underneath either!
But that would be something to look into, gleanerjunkie.

A few more questions though ( and you thought they would end
)
What direction do you rip? At an angle? Or perpendicular to the direction you seed at? And do you rip whole fields or just problem areas (meaning do you rip where it pulls easy?)

That's all I can think of for now (hehe) (More to come I'm sure...)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
We rip at a slight angle to how we plant. Rip the whole field from one side to the other with no skips also. If you get a good ripper with some tucker/closing wheels in the rear you can plant right behind it. Thats where running at an angle helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
I think pretty much any manufacturer can make a good subsoiler these days. It just depends on who can give you the features you need at the right price. We use a Bigham Brothers unit and it works pretty good. I've never used a Krause ripper before, but they do make quality equipment. We don't have any rocks so we can get by with just shear bolt protection, which saves money. I'm not sure how necessary coulters are if your residue conditions aren't very heavy, but they'll be nice if you have something like bindweed out there that's going to wrap on the shanks.

(I was looking through a magazine a few days ago and saw an ad for a company that uses a universal attachment point on their shanks so you can use JD or DMI points if you wanted. Unfortunately I can't remember who the company was or where I saw it. I'll edit this if I can find it again.)

If you're buying used, pay close attention to the frame. If it has any welds that don't look factory or pieces of steel welded across cracks, pass it up. If the frame was cracking for the previous owner, it'll crack on you.

Horsepower requirements are kinda hard to figure. Well, they're easy to figure with the right equations, but the numbers are really general. Using ASAE standard values for draft I figured it would take about 15 horsepower per shank pulled 10 inches deep through sandy loam at 5 mph. I'd say 18-20hp per shank would be a good ballpark figure considering your alkali spots. I don't know what your biggest tractor is, but we have a neighbor that used to pull a 9 shank V-ripper with a 6030 with triples. We used to pull a 13 shank with an 8440 and (for a short time) a Case 3594. Our current unit has 7 shanks and we could probably pull more, but this way it matches up with our 12 row planter. We've pulled it with the 8440 and 4955.

The direction of travel is based either on erosion concerns or personal preference. We rip in the direction we plant because we don't like bouncing across ripper tracks. Since it doesn't rain much we can go straight up a hill without doing much damage. We also rip the whole field, but that's usually because the whole field needs it.

Hope my essay helped a bit.

Kevin
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top