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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We put up approx. 640 tonne of silage this year, and I am trying to put a value on it. It is about 90% Cicer milkvetch 10% grass. It was cut a little on the later side. I have not done feed samples yet. Just wondering what you think it's worth? I am nw sask. Thanks
 

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Barley silage is often priced at 10-11 times the bu price of feed barley +1. So if barley is $3/bu the silage is priced at $33/ton. It may be different now.
 

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Neil, any I have sold in the past was based on dry tons and price was based on current hay prices and level of protein. Usually silage is over normal hay levels, and price was adjusted upwards in an appropriate percentage in any dealings I know of. We used the microwave to dry it out determine moisture, I just forget the proper procedure, been a while. Also who loads was a factor as well.

As I remember the largest sale, it worked out about the same as good quality hay, as it was two years old, they paid for all tests and they loaded it as well. That was on a pit of approx 600 dry ton of half and half cereal/alfalfa mix. Feed was in demand that winter as well and it was only a few mile haul for them.
 

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Barley silage is often priced at 10-11 times the bu price of feed barley +1. So if barley is $3/bu the silage is priced at $33/ton. It may be different now.
Hello CRToney
Guys do the same kind of thing with corn silage, using a formula based on the price of a bushel of grain corn. It seems to be the industry standard, but I never agreed with that, putting a price on silage based on something that it could've been (harvested as dry grain) rather than what it actually is (harvested as chop). I guess it's a good starting point, but what if due to management or mother nature not co-operating & said crop was put up too dry and/or too old (not enough WSC to ferment properly) & the pile heated & burnt up a lot of the nutrients (resulting in poor quality feed)?:confused:
Right or wrong, I've always put a price on my silage based on what it is, based on my feed test results. I feel that this is a truer value of what it is worth.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, so if the value of hay is going for $77 per tonne (.035 lbs). I would take that and divide it by 85% dry matter which equals $90 a tonne for dry matter. If silage is approx. 35% dry matter I would take that and multiply it by $90, which equals $31.5 per tonne? Does this seem close? Cr toney would be close. Anyway hopefully my math is right. I will know better when we open the pit and see what the quality is. Hoping to not do that for a couple months though and would like to be squared up for costs. Thanks for the help
 

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Hello Neil Burg
Yes. I use this formula as a starting point:

Price of dry hay X DM of silage = Price of silage
DM of dry hay
77.00 X 35 = 31.70
85
Then I adjust it once I get the feed test results.
 

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I don't sell silage. I just remember that formula from some meetings on what feedlots would pay for silage when buying it from farmers. I guess it wouldn't include cutting, chopping and hauling. We put up good feed. How do you put up crappy silage? When the crop is ready we put it in the bag. If it's too wet we wait, hopefully we don't have a breakdown for it to be too dry.
 
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