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I think both Kubota and Tachahuchi? Have no idea if that spelling is close have sliding doors as do the older Deere's.
I have a JCB dealer close by and I found thier rig pretty interesting but they don't build one big enough for me. What I found with the Deere that I have I can easily lift my pallet forks high enough to adjust them myself. That is by far the most important. It takes about two min to get the door off if needed but a 15 min job to go back on. I have to remove usually when checking wheel bearings on the seeder. They make good jacks.
Some skidsteers won t let ya open the door even just a couple inches off the ground and that is ridiculous IMO
I think it's takehutchi you are looking for. That's a nice unit, they make the Gehl track units too.
 

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have had a NH c238 since 2011, have 4600 hours more or less. Second set of tracks idlers and sprockets got 3000 hours.Make sure whatever you buy has dealer support, it shakes vibrates its abused so the hoses electrial everything needs care things leak and corrode
 

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Another thing to remember is a track skid steer has different load ratings than a wheeled machine. A 1900# lift track machine will lift closer to 2500#. Track machines are rated to a lower percentage of roll over capacity because they are typically operated in softer conditions. On our bobcat t320 we typically run it with the door off 90 % of the time. Cab air and heat are nice but an extra pain to keep working.
 

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No, they don't.
I've got 2 forklifts, a 706 Allis Chalmers and a little Dautson, they both have thier place and there is nothing that will replace forklifts in thier applications. Handy and relatively inexpensive tools. I guess the 706 wasn't that cheap but you can't buy a good cherry picker for what I paid for my Dautson
 

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go get a skidsteer of any type, we got one thinking that we would not use it all that much and now I am not sure how we lived without one. we run a cat 262 it had wheels on it and we found a track kit at an auction and put it one, from that experience I would say track all the way for general grain farm use. If you were in crushed rock all the time then I would say wheels but for general farm use go tracks. If you do go with tracks just be mindful that there are a significant number of different track undercarriages out there and some can be very expensive for maintenance and in general maintenance costs for tracks will be higher than tires. for example in the cat you can get two types the 9 series with is basically a dozer type undercarriage, and the 7 type which is the asv undercarriage. when i say 9 and 7 that is usually the last number of the skid steer, ie. at cat 277 vs cat 279. the asv will usually cost a lot more in maintenance than the other, but the asv undercarriage is so smooth.

as for the forklift vs skidsteer argument there is no comparison we have both and the skidsteer get used 10 times as much, but the forklift sure is handy for some thing like moving pallets and jumping on and off quickly. getting in and out of a skid steer is a little bit of a pain. If I were getting another skid steer I would seriously consider the jcb or volvo for the side door option because it is a pain when you cant get out with the bucket up a little. Having said that I have been very happy with the cat and wouldn't hesitate to buy another one.

From my perspective if you can afford it dont wait any longer, we have a number of front end loaders, a forklift, and skidsteer and the skidsteer gets used more times than the other units combined if you exclude general tractor pulling type work.
 

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We've had an old Ford CL40 wheeled machine on our farm for the last 30 years. Its an old worn out unit now but it was/is the most important piece of equipment on the farm.
Last year I bought a CAT 257B on tracks with the ASV undercarriage and about 2000hrs. I'm very impressed with the tracks over wheels and would definitely not go back to wheels. I'm surprised more guys don't have a CAT machine. I have a dealer in Tisdale/Saskatoon/Prince Albert so parts are pretty easy to get. Ive had to do some maintenance on the undercarriage but nothing too serious.
Everyone is different but I would never go to foot controls. Hand controls are much smoother and easier to do delicate work than with foot controls. Just my opinion.
Also make sure you buy bigger than you think you need.
 

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Bought a 773 bobcat 10 years ago. Would never be without one again. We are a grain farm and still see 200 hrs a year on it. Nothing fancy about ours. Cab, heat, lights worn out seat and the door is easily removed when not needed. I often tell myself I should upgrade it and then it works perfectly for another year and the urge fades. Like most have said, buy bigger 2500#+. we can’t lift that and I wish we could sometimes but our 10000 hour 6300 with permy pallet forks is still very happy to do the heavy lifting, which for us is usually just Edge granular and new bins etc.
 

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How are telehandlers for dirt work? Leveling gravel and making final grade?
Skidsteer is better for dirt-work and close quarters. I have a bucket for my telehandler and rarely put it on, usually use to FWA with loader or I have a compact tractor for tight work. Now that I got a skidsteer it will do a lot of that.

For the lifting my telehandler is awesome. On mine I can see the forks really well and no forklift can reach across a deck to pick pallets. I get comments almost every time a trailer load of seed/chem/bins/etc is delivered that the delivery guy has never seen something as efficient as my telehandler, I am thinking they primarily deal with forklifts.

I questioned whether it would be used much when I bought it but it gets used nearly every day for a million different things! The day it dies I will have to call RB auction and list the farm because I don't think I could farm without it now. Thought I had a better picture but you get the idea. It's a JCB 520 with 4WS and 4WD.
 

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We had a new Bobcat skid steer out on demo last spring. It was about 75hp. Salesmen dropped it off and we didnt really find much use for it around our farm. Didn’t like the ride of it at all and a pain in the butt to get in and out. We have a Case 586 forklift. I wouldn’t trade it for a skid steer. We put over 100 hours a year on it. It can lift a good 6000 pounds and it will lift 21 feet high. Sure it’s no good for dirt work but we got several other machines that will do anything a skid steer is able to.
 

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Skidsteer is better for dirt-work and close quarters. I have a bucket for my telehandler and rarely put it on, usually use to FWA with loader or I have a compact tractor for tight work. Now that I got a skidsteer it will do a lot of that.

I questioned whether it would be used much when I bought it but it gets used nearly every day for a million different things!
For for general farm use where there may not such an assortment of different equipment to chose from the telehandler is the best use average unit of a forklift, skid steer or telehandler.
Forklifts are great in a warehouse setting but for general farm use I wouldn’t have one as a gift.

I also questioned a telehandler but after renting one for a house build there was no way it was going back, it is the go to unit for any handy work in the yard.
 

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For for general farm use where there may not such an assortment of different equipment to chose from the telehandler is the best use average unit of a forklift, skid steer or telehandler.
Forklifts are great in a warehouse setting but for general farm use I wouldn’t have one as a gift.

I also questioned a telehandler but after renting one for a house build there was no way it was going back, it is the go to unit for any handy work in the yard.
Might depend on your farm. Might be the best for yours but I doubt a telehandler would do half the things I do with my skid steer.
 

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I was the field guy for bobcat of Edmonton... before Cervus contractors group bought em out (big mistake) but I worked on all makes and found the bobcat brand the best to work on. If you go bobcat, stay with a "G" series for general machine simplicity. If your ok with or can find a machine with only foot controls you eliminate the electronic actuators and controller for lift and tilt. Foot controll only will have manual linkages in g series.
The kubota engines are very trouble free in my experience.
Tracks are awesome, but in rentals we found that the "zigzag" pattern gives the best winter and all around traction.
Also track machines eliminate the chain case, chains, sprockets, bearings, seals and axles associated with wheeled machines. Just don't let em freeze up with mud in the winter!
Imo the bobcat belt drive pumpset is much better than dealing with the inline drive couplers found in other machines, drive belt will give thousands of hours if kept properly tensioned.
Lastly if you need to with the tapered pins for buckett tilt and pivot make sure to check bolt torque for the first 100 hrs... if you let the pin taper wallow out it will be headaches for ever, once it stays tight it will be good till the pin is wore out. That being said new weld in tapered pin bosses are avail through parts.
Pm me about bobcat questions if you like.
 

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Oddly enough I don’t think, but know I can say exactly the same thing about a telehandler.
All of them have thier application (don't get me wrong, I want to own a telehandler)
My little forklift is the muscle in the shop and makes a heck of a welding bentch, it fits around the machinery in the shop. When it comes to setting stuff in a pickup box or putting tires on the sprayer that's my go to machine.
My 706 Allis loads super sacks, chem totes and bulk boxes in the spring to send them to the field so the skidder can do skid steer stuff and load the planter in the field. It also has a 30' mast so it's got hight. It does the majority of the heavy lifting around the shop.
My skid steer has a pick up and gooseneck trailer pretty much dedicated to hauling it around for everything from hauling hay to drain work.
I don't need a telehandler because I am pretty well covered but would like one for a better ride. It's on my bucket list but not a necessity.
It's all about application, if I start a building project I'll be shopping for a telehandler.
 

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We own all of the above. For grading and light duty loading a skidsteer is king. If you want to move serious material a payloader can’t be beat. When you want reach a telehandler is hard to beat. I despise loading with a tractor and loader. Our t320 will move 4000# plus and get into tighter areas than our small telehandler. But our 621 case payloader will pick up the t320 and carry it away when it throws a track. Trying to compare all the options is like trying to find a one size fit all tractor. Sometimes you need 400hp 4wd and sometimes you just need a 100 hp utility
 
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