The Combine Forum banner

21 - 40 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
Do yourself a favor and go with the new Gleaner, S78 or S97 with a 40 ft 9255 dynaflex and put a stiebauer chip in and make your own class 9 machine, I run S88's and love them but you can chip for a lot less money. If I were going to switch, only the Case would I consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
I did find the quote page. And my dealer price is higher then the list price on the web page, so obviously there is some wiggle room. On the other hand my JD dealer has come off the list price A LOT!!!

Thanks drp this gives me some more ammunition!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
I think the Gleaner guy is higher to make up for the trade value he gave me. If you know anyone that is looking for some R72's let me know. I'm getting beat up pretty good on the trade value for my Gleaners by turning green.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,740 Posts
I think the Gleaner guy is higher to make up for the trade value he gave me. If you know anyone that is looking for some R72's let me know. I'm getting beat up pretty good on the trade value for my Gleaners by turning green.
If the 72's are well equipped and Cummins machines finding homes for them will be easy.
I would post them up on this site and bismanonline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,116 Posts
If you have a reputable dealer close by, owning the brand they sell makes life easier. This is only reason JD is so common in certain areas. What I wouldn't give to have the many dealerships that (my local town had a MF dealership) were abound in the 70's and early 80's. JD is closest to me at Kelvington now but I just can't do it lol. The arrogance that goes with owning green just puts a bad taste in my mouth. One guy bought a Deere side by side a few yrs back. He was telling me how good it was. He was all green. I thought well my Polaris seems good but I never drove a Deere yet so I better check it out. First impression looking at it was nice tilting box and overall appearance. Then I take it for a ride. It's turning radius was light yrs behind other brands. The floor boards for some reason on the outside edge came in to the cab area 2 1/2" which I quickly learned was for cowshit to go whizzing by your leg rather than staying in the fender. It was hard as **** to steer and the ride was stiff as ****. I was impressed with the sound of the Yanmar engine and throaty sound it had though. We head out one day with both familys into the forest for a weenie roast and had to cross a run, about 12 feet across where a culvert had been dug out on a logging road. The deepest spot was likely 18" of water. I cross and am waiting for him and his Deere stalls coming out up the bank. He and his wife are dumbfounded as to why. Wasn't long before we found out that this Deere had the air intake for the motor down behind the passenger seat and filled his new motor with water. Deere is still the best in his world and he never takes his side by side anywhere but around his yard and pasture any more. Things I learned about people over the yrs is never get opinions from someone who only has one brand throughout their entire line up. Bias opinions just ooze from their words!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,241 Posts
mtfarmer, you ever look at red? I have not personally ran the S series deere but I watch them around me. I have ran a few 9770sts. I will use red anyday over green. Largely if you have any kochia patches. My dad's 9770 is the only Green rotor I have seen that doesn't plug tailings at the site of russian thistle or kochia. My neighbors just cut around the patches anymore. I have seen one guy just not cut an entire field of wheat. Well, he tried then it looks like he quit. My dad's combine has noticeably less capacity than the others I have ran. Have never figured out what is the different. Hopefully you do a better job at weed control than we do over here. I also find the red ones much easier to set. If Peter is available for you with the red combines, he is a huge resource if you have any problems at all. No one in Montana or Alberta has a guy like Peter to help out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Maybe in dryland conditions. Irrigation, not so much. We found going from a class 7 to class 8 Case combine gained us almost nothing in terms of performance. In our conditions, with acceptable losses, a class 9 combine might gain 25% over a class 7. I'm skeptical of your 50% gain claim. Unless you're talking about a twin rotor (NH, or Claas). Best case scenario, there's a 10-15% gain in performance going from 7 to 8, and the same jump going to a class 9.
Fair talking capacity, I was thinking more ac/Hr over raw capacity. Gaining not only some capacity as well as adjusting to new speeds in Dry conditions I have seen 30% gains in ground covered. I will admit I was a bit liberal with 1.5. More like 1.3-1.35. Fair? Either way 3 should keep up to 5 after a bit of learning, was more the point
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,274 Posts
I will admit I was a bit liberal with 1.5. More like 1.3-1.35. Fair? Either way 3 should keep up to 5 after a bit of learning, was more the point
Hmm, not according to your own figures. Replacing 5 machines with 3 means you'll require a gain in capacity (however you want to define it) of 1.7x. That means you almost need double capacity per machine. That's just not going to happen. Four machines could do it, sure. But definitely not three. Call me skeptical. The OP will have to keep us informed as to how it goes next harvest. The big Deere's could be all that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
Hmm, not according to your own figures. Replacing 5 machines with 3 means you'll need a gain in capacity (however you want to define it) of 1.7x. That's just not going to happen in my opinion. 4 machines, sure. But definitely not 3. Call me skeptical.
Depending on how he is set up for handling the grain(carts and trucks) that could gain some efficiency. Having 5 machines in one field is not gonna be very efficient compared to 1,2 or even three machines.

5 to 3 is a big jump but I am doing probably 200% or more of what my 1688's used to do a decade ago, and there is a fair bit more grain now. Maybe Gleaner made some big advances over those years too???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,274 Posts
I'm guessing the OP already has a grain cart or carts. You'd need that with 5 combines.

Yes you could be probably right. The old gleaners are what, class 5? If we were talking about a class 7 machine, I'm definitely going to stand by my skepticism.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
I'm guessing the OP already has a grain cart or carts. You'd need that with 5 combines.

Yes you are probably right. The old gleaners are what, class 5? If we were talking about a class 7 machine, I'm definitely going to stand by my skepticism.
Without knowing what goes on there I wouldn't count on it, but it might be possible. Heck, servicing 5 machines can drag into harvest hours if you aren't organized.
 
  • Like
Reactions: torriem

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,740 Posts
I'm guessing the OP already has a grain cart or carts. You'd need that with 5 combines.

Yes you could be probably right. The old gleaners are what, class 5? If we were talking about a class 7 machine, I'm definitely going to stand by my skepticism.
A R72 with the M11 was 330hp with a 300 bu hopper. These were big boys toys back in the day and still are nothing to sneeze at.
I have harvested with a lot of new combines of different colors but the fastest cleanest combine I have ever run with was a modified r72.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
We cut wheat, peas, and chickpeas so are similar to the OP. As far as comparing it to JD 680's of neighbors the Gleaners are getting more cut in our area in a day. The R76 was more capacity than the R72's but the S77 wasn't much more capacity but had a great sample and not put much out the back. The 7 cylinder Sisu engine is a beast compared to anything before it. When running an S77 at 100% power, the S78 was running at 72% with a five foot wider header. The new engine is so crucial to get more capacity as the S77 just lacked power.

I had posted earlier about how we have eaten up the cage in 450 hours so a lot of material was run through the combine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,740 Posts
I had posted earlier about how we have eaten up the cage in 450 hours so a lot of material was run through the combine.
That was a chrome cage too, correct?
I don't think any other manufacturers offer that unless maybe a rice package?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
It was a factory chrome only on the inside and not on the outside. It seems like straw goes through and wears the outside back in. A neighbor that ran a S680 one season pulled its guts as it had holes in it to be repaired and go to the chrome shop. A friend stopped by today and said the new 8240 he ran had holes in it before it made it through its first season so it happens to them all. We replaced and chromed our other S78 from the local chrome shop and it is still new looking as our other S78 with the factory chrome that had to have the cage replaced. Goes to show there are a lot better chrome available than factory. Costs money though to get the new pieces soda blasted to get the paint off to get a good chrome job. Our new cage will have factory chrome plus new chrome on top of that before it goes back in the combine.

On to capacity I watch some in our area who can cut more with two crews of two combines than they can with the four combines together. The fields may be 200-600 acres so with 4 they are burning through some in less than a day and we have to take off headers to get moved because roads just aren't big enough burning time. With just two combines in a field at least the can go a couple days in a couple different fields and not having to break down to move as much making them more efficient. The capacity is the same because they are the same combines but in two different management setups.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,241 Posts
It was a factory chrome only on the inside and not on the outside. It seems like straw goes through and wears the outside back in. A neighbor that ran a S680 one season pulled its guts as it had holes in it to be repaired and go to the chrome shop. A friend stopped by today and said the new 8240 he ran had holes in it before it made it through its first season so it happens to them all. We replaced and chromed our other S78 from the local chrome shop and it is still new looking as our other S78 with the factory chrome that had to have the cage replaced. Goes to show there are a lot better chrome available than factory. Costs money though to get the new pieces soda blasted to get the paint off to get a good chrome job. Our new cage will have factory chrome plus new chrome on top of that before it goes back in the combine.

On to capacity I watch some in our area who can cut more with two crews of two combines than they can with the four combines together. The fields may be 200-600 acres so with 4 they are burning through some in less than a day and we have to take off headers to get moved because roads just aren't big enough burning time. With just two combines in a field at least the can go a couple days in a couple different fields and not having to break down to move as much making them more efficient. The capacity is the same because they are the same combines but in two different management setups.
I used to run Chrome rasp bars in a Deere walker combine. I had to pull them from cracking damage. They don't wear much but I couldn't afford the damage. I know rotor combines flat out do not crack grain like a conventional can. At least the ones I ran. Do you see any increased cracking damage when you chrome the parts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
I used to run Chrome rasp bars in a Deere walker combine. I had to pull them from cracking damage. They don't wear much but I couldn't afford the damage. I know rotor combines flat out do not crack grain like a conventional can. At least the ones I ran. Do you see any increased cracking damage when you chrome the parts?
The rotary is easy on peas. We have much more problems cracking from augers in the combine. A nice flow of material is gentle in the cage other than fresh chrome doesn't like much green on the pea vines. It can plus the cage catching on all the rough chrome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,045 Posts
Also don't have to wait for the cart to pull away before you fold it back in. I know the older CaseIH combines would hit when you folded back with the cart still there. Not sure about the flagship machines.
I can assure you that you have to worry about cart tarp bows with a 7230 CIH about like one did with a 1480. I swear a 1680 through the new Midrange machines have better geometry than the Flagships.

That, and the second transition cone punching through at 1100-1200 hours, and the grain pan loading up with corn going downhill and puking it out the back once you returned to level resulted in me not being overly impressed with the Flagships. Yeah, lots more capacity than a Legacy, but what doesnt?
 
21 - 40 of 45 Posts
Top