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Variability amongst nozzles on your rig is the worst thing. If you have rate control, even wear is compensated for to a point. Pattern is obviously important too, and you can spray paper to test that.
 

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How do you test flow rate on nozzles?
Thank you.
Gary
A container with nice graduations and a second hand on a watch. Flow for a minute, or even 30 seconds. There should be information on what your nozzles gallon per minute should be, if not, you can still check for consistency amongts your nozzles.
 

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Is it 5% variance between nozzles that you change?
That sounds low.
Maybe a good practise would be to do a static, relatively high known pressure check occasionally to check flow but that doesn't help with the individual nozzles I guess.
 

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Don, I honestly don't remember if the reference material I read said 5% or 10% variance. Variance from each other or from original spec. I believe a rate control system can compensate for even wear from spec as long as the pattern is decent. The interesting thing, once you find 3 that are off, it said to change them all. "Might seem like a waste, but if you have 3 it's a good indication that things are worn out and you'll have erratic performance". According to that reference. . .. to each their own!
 

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Usually it is recommended that the nozzles get changed if the variance is either +/-5%.

Industry Standard in Canada is to have the nozzle perform within 3% of the required spec. In some other countries (not sure about USA), but it seems to be 10% variance in just the design portion.

So, when you look at your tip and see the numbers (i.e. 110-025), that will tell you the angle of the tip (110 degrees) and the US Gallon/minute flow rate @40PSI and 80degrees F.

So, when you are running your tips, best to try have them running at 40PSI and then test them for something divisible by a minute. For example, 0.25 Gallons if you were collecting in your graduated bucket for ONE MINUTE, or .0125 Gallons if you were collecting for 30 SECONDS.

You get the deal.

There are a few tools out there that don't cost too much that can simplify it.

Spot-ON is a calibration tool. I'd suggest getting the extra pressure check with it as well, as it takes the pressure into account as well.

Appli-max (ATI Agtronics) has a similiar bucket tool that has a pressure check built in as well.

Although it seems like one of those 'scare tactic' industry videos, take a look at
Detecting Nozzle Wear - Worn Nozzles Could Be Costing You Thousands
Shows what two nozzles side by side are looking like, but one of the two are putting out more than 30% more than the other.
 
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