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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're going to tackle removing the concave from our 585R this weekend. We are going to be replacing it with the HHS setup. We got a packet of instructions from our dealer, but are wondering if anybody has any tips as to the best way to do this that might not be in the manual.
 

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Here is what I recall from chainging ours to roundbar on a 740.

Remove two-speed gearbox bolts so cylinder spins freely.

Remove feederhouse; skidsteer or forklift helps.

Lower front shaker pan; do this by removing the bolts that go through the shaker rubber bushings. I think they should be re-installed and tightened at mid-stroke of the pan.

Remove a large bolt on both sides that support the pan under the impeller/front of rotors. This bolt goes through a bushing that needs to be removed. Doing this will allow the rear "arms" of the concave to come forward.

Block up concaves so they don't damage shaker pan. 2x4 lumber should work.

Remove pre-concave/aps frame out of the front of machine after disconnecting linkage connecting it to adjusting mechanism and front of main concave.

Remove main concave. Of course you need to remove pins on its back side where it pivots. Pulling the main concave out can be a tight fit, but it will come.

It would be a very good time to repair any other items while it is apart. I am currently repairing my machine while the cylinder is removed before re-installing a sunnybrook cylinder. My factory cylinder is worn more heavily in the middle. After installing a straight edge on my bars, I think I will find the bars worn down at least 1/4" in the middle compared to the outside. My roundbar concave is also worn in the middle more.

I am putting expandable foam on the ceiling above the APS and cylinder thinking it will quiet the machine down while threshing...just a theory.

I installed some flat metal between rear of APS frame and roundbar concave. The roundbar concave begins with keystock running the length of concave. In front of this concave is flat metal with no holes in it, not allowing grain through. Although the raised keystock helps thresh, it also causes cracks as there is no where for the grain to fall through. The flat metal raises the floor, and makes the keystock smooth for the flow.

The back of the concave has a piece of bent steel on it to help the crop transition from concave to impeller. Between last round bar and this steel is a depression shaped like a sideways V for crop to spear into. I filled this area with bondo to make it smooth for awhile. Probably replace concave in a year anyway so Bondo won't have to last long anyway.

Replacing impeller wear plates with longer ones after I install cylinder.


Dont forget to re-level new concave. That can take time.
 

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Unless something is different with the 500 series on the 400's we never had to play with the shoe, if you crafty with a couple chains you can support the concave with the cylinder and you roll it out onto the forks and back in reverse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So we've been working on it all day, and the instructions we got from the dealer are terrible. How do we remove those pins from the rear of the main concave and get them back in without losing fingers? We haven't removed the aps cylinder or the main cylinder yet, it appears you you didn't remove yours and still managed to get the concave in?
 

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Correct, you can definately leave the cylinder and APS in place.

I guess I don't fully understand the pin question...block up the bottom of the concave with lumber, take a hammer and tap the pins in (assuming you can hit them from the outside, I don't recall which way they go. Actually, I think you have to be on the inside and hit them out if I recall correctly)

Don't forget to remove the two large bolts from the outside that secure the rotor intake floor to the outside of the combine. They are large shiny bolts on my machine.

Should then be able to slide and roll the concave out and around the cylinder. (have the cylinder in "neutral" to help roll it out.

Before you install your new concave, I would match them up side by side and compare. Assuming your old concave was in good condition and built properly, your new aftermarket should match up the curvature and pin locations pretty close. Last thing you want to do is a new install and find out a day later you cant get it leveled or something doesn't line up right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Our main concave fits very tightly side to side and barely dropped when we removed the pivot pins. We did remove the bolts and collars underneath the rotor intake floor. The concave seems to be free from all connecting points, but fits so tightly we are having problems pulling it out the front and being able to rotate it up or down to clear the main cylinder and aps.

My question about those pins is how you get them lined up again when installing the new concave. If the new one fits as tight as the old, it is going to be very difficult to finagle the new concave into alignment with the pins. We are surprised how tightly the concave fits.

Part of our problem might be that we haven't ever harvested an acre with a lexion. We just traded for this and have some pretty variable crop conditions that we wanted to be able to dial in so we figured we'd put the hhs concave in. Definitely a learning process.
 

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You do not need to remove the APS or Cylinder. Use a hoist on the front side to carry the front load. It will be tight enough on the sides that it will bind if you don't remove it parallel to the machine sides.

Before installing, polish the sliding areas to make sure that all rust is removed that will ensure the concave adjusts for a long time. I sprayed mine with slip plate dry lube.

It takes a little finagling, but you will get it. Its not that hard of a job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, sounds like the consensus is that we'll get it. ;-)

We've got the concave blocked up for now until I can come home for another weekend from my day job. It'll have to wait till then. Thanks for the encouragement. We are trying to document the process in pictures so that we can post an eventual how-to. At the rate we're going, there are going to be more how-not-to pics than how-to pics, but it'll hopefully be informative to somebody.
 

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Remove concave

You do not need to remove the APS or Cylinder. Use a hoist on the front side to carry the front load. It will be tight enough on the sides that it will bind if you don't remove it parallel to the machine sides.

Before installing, polish the sliding areas to make sure that all rust is removed that will ensure the concave adjusts for a long time. I sprayed mine with slip plate dry lube.

It takes a little finagling, but you will get it. Its not that hard of a job.
I took the concave out of my 480 last winter. I was rebuilding the impeller so had it out anyway and also took out the aps to renew it and balance it. I am surprised to hear others say that the concave will come out without taking out , at least the aps. When you roll the concave forward around the bottom of the cylinder, it seems to me that you would have to have the aps out of there to allow room for the concave to come forward and up enough to get out from under the cylinder??? That is how I did mine but I can't say for sure that it will not work without taking out the aps.

Also a note on using a skid steer. We had the forks on but found that the back rack on the fork setup was too high to fit under the cab . You are working totally under the cab floor so there is very little height under there for the back rack of the forks. We cut off the back rack to do the concave lift and then welded an overlapping side plate on each side of the rack and reattached the rack with bolts. It worked very well. I don't think a forklift would work unless the forklift was big and had long forks.

Let us know how you do your job. Good luck!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
We finally managed to get the old concave out and new one back in. While I was inside of the combine putting the rotor support bushings and upper concave arm pins in, noticed that the is probably a 1.5" gap between the concave and the rotor transition cones. I was able to put my hand between them and touch the impeller. Is this normal? I'll try to attach a pic, but they aren't very good.
 

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We finally managed to get the old concave out and new one back in. While I was inside of the combine putting the rotor support bushings and upper concave arm pins in, noticed that the is probably a 1.5" gap between the concave and the rotor transition cones. I was able to put my hand between them and touch the impeller. Is this normal? I'll try to attach a pic, but they aren't very good.
FINALLY!!!

Someone else has spoken up about this!!! I have thought ever since, likely the end of 2011, that our 740 had too large of a gap in this area. I get that the concave needs to move up and down, and the impeller floor is stationary, by why Claas has such a large gap under a critical component already working over-time is beyond me! I changed the piece that bolts onto the back of the concave to extend its floor back farther. I did so essentially by welding on an angle iron to it and cutting out the areas of it for access to the bolts, and areas where it would contact the original impeller floor, which would be both sides and the middle.

Here is what I did.

http://www.thecombineforum.com/forums/12-claas-lexion/97065-impeller-area-upgrade-pictures.html
 
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