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I'm looking for a combine, and need some more information about the TR combines. I am mostly familiar with CaseIH and the older Deere's but like some of the features on the TR's. I'm looking for information like http://www.hoober.com/home/axial flow history.htm this page has for the axial flow combines. Also, what things to watch for on used TR's and what heads are/aren't good choices. Will be looking for a 6-30 corn head, and a 20-30' flex head, depending on combine.

I'm replacing a 1680 for size, and could probably go down a size.

Thanks in advance,

Mike
 

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The first one, the TR 70, came out in 1975.
It was the first American-built New Holland combine.
It was the first true rotary combine built in North America.
The Belgian-made 1400 and 1500 accompanied the TR 70 from 1975 to 1979.

In 1980, New Holland discontued all three previous combines and went all-rotary with the "Second Generation" TR's, the TR 75, TR 85 and TR 95.

I'm not exactly clear where it went from there, as the TR 75 was dropped when the 85 and 95 were changed to 86 and 96. From then on, the overall color scheme changed, Ford bought new Holland from Speery, the latter digit of each number increased by one, and stuff like that. I also can't tell you just what engine features accompanies each new TR model, but I do know the TR's have had an excellent track record over the past 32 years and just keep getting better.


I do however, still prefer the style of the original TR cab without the solid corner posts. If only they had kept that, but still added today's modern ergonomics and controls.
 

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The big change in the TR 86/96 models from previos 85/95 series was the new style cab and the S3 rotors. Earlier TR's had straight rasp bars while the S3 started using 3 sections of short staggered rasp bars. This design allows for a constant load on the rotor where the old straigt bar design had heavy loaded parts of roation and lightly loaded times.
The first generation of S3 rotors used the same core rotor as the old design but had skins that bolted to them that had the rasp bars. It is possible to install the S3 skins into a TR85/95 machine.
The TR86/96 were built for arouns 10 years. The later ones had the generation-2 S3 rotors. These were made to directly mount the rasp bars instead of using skins.
NH used CAT 3208 engines on the TR85/95 machines and the first year of production of the TR86/96. After that all 86/96 machines had the Ford 7.8L inline 6 engine. The TR87/97 brought in the 7.5L Genesis engine. The model numbers continued to advance to the TR88/98 and then finally the TR89/99. Each change brought in minor changes like elevators and to operator controls but the basic machine did not change.
 
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