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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys:
New to the forum and glad I found it.
I have a question for you on trading combines.
I have a 1994 TR97 with 1650 hrs on it. Mostly used in corn bean rotation. Our neighbor just traded a 2002 TR99 with 695 hours on it for a leftover 960.
What would you expect to pay on a trade like this. Our TR97 still has the plastic on the seat, very clean still has old style clean grain Hi-speed chain drive not newer heavy duty gearbox like TR98.
Should I even look at a good used CR960 or 970? I need advice from you guys that have operated them. Have they got the bugs out of them yet?
Thanks for your help
Old Tr
 

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Are you really sure you want to trade up? Your combine still has under 2,000 hours and is eligible for up to 6,000 or more hours if maintained very well, too. Also, your machine should be very close to being paid for, if not already.


I sure like the capacity of those larger TR's and power is not any real issue, either. They are quite simple to work on, too, from what I can see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Combine is paid for. I just wanted some discussion on whether or not one should consider a trade on a lower hour combine. Buying hours I guess. I know the operator of the TR99 and he takes care of his equipment to.
Thanks
 

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That's good to know, too. I can see many good, strong points on the TR's. They are well-made and durable combines. If you're really interested in adding years and hours to your combine's life, I will be happy to link you to a harvester I know who has done great wonders on extending his combines' hours and kept them very well, too.
Also check your private message. It's in the upper right of page. Click on it, and your message list will appear.
 

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Just by looking around the internet theres about a $20,000 difference between TR97s in your area and Ohio. Used 960s and 970s go for around $200,000+ so you'd likly pay well over $150,000. Not too much difference between the brand new ones and one a few years old. The cab layout is alittle different. Guts are the same. There an awesome machine to run. I run a 940 and going from running a TR88 to a 940, bout time. Now when someone rides around with you you won't have to play touchy feely with them. Plenty of room for 2.

Take care,

Nathan

 

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Quote:That's good to know, too. I can see many good, strong points on the TR's. They are well-made and durable combines. If you're really interested in adding years and hours to your combine's life, I will be happy to link you to a harvester I know who has done great wonders on extending his combines' hours and kept them very well, too.
Also check your private message. It's in the upper right of page. Click on it, and your message list will appear.
 

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I'll pass along a few things I have learned thru the years about the TR's. I have owned 10 or 11 of them since '78. I have used them on wheat,barley, oats, canola, corn, soybeans, sunflowers, milo and rye.
My suggestion is to trade your TR-97 for the TR-99. The '99 has many features not available on the earlier models. First of all the '99 has more horsepower in the Genesis engine with the most fuel efficient engine of any. The clean grain elevator is wider to take more corn. The bubbleup auger is different and needs the latest update in it. If after 1200-1500 sep. hours it wears out the tube and flighting. My suggestion is to put in a straight bubbleup and add a hyd. after market in tank auger especially if you have a grain tan extension, which I highly recommend. The fine chop straw chopper is a must and the industry best for that model. The 2002 model seems to wear better. I think they put in some harder steel. I had three TR-99's. the one we have presently is by far wearing the best. Even the feederhouse, clean grain, and retail elevator chains wear better.
Their are several little things on the newer model that make it a better machine. We have never had any trouble with the genises engine. The top housing around the rotors needs to be checked for wear. If it is a corn-soybean combine it should be ok. If it's a small grain machine the rotor covers wear fast. You may be lucky enough to get round bar concaves in the 99. They work great for corn and soybeans only.
Capacity in corn is about 2500 bu. per hour with the 99. the prior models only can get about 2000 before it starts to fill the fan up w/clean corn. I would hope the 99 has a yield monitor in it too. NH used the ag leader monitor and that is the best.
Two speed rotors are an option, but it isn't needed in my book.
The hours you say are on the 99 are very low and that machine should do you great for 1500 hours easily w/o much maint. Compared to an STS the maintenance cost is about 1/4. We custom harvest in the summer and our maintenance has always been lower that the JD's.
We have been trading for for used TR's with 600-800 hour machines for $42 / seperator hour. the past two or three trades.
I rented a CR940 in '03 and '04 with a 30 foot Honeybee draper out west. I just loved it and had BO problems at all. I know there are or were some issues w/ the CR's. I just would love to have a 960, but it's just too much money yet.
I would love to have a HoneyBee flex-draper head, but not yet because of cost. The flex-draper is a dream in soybeans too.
I hope this info helps. contact me if you have some more questions.
We are not out west the past two years. The cost of fuel and lots more corn to harvest here, and then too my final grandson grew up so I ran out of help. Cody and two of his friends are out west this summer working for Danielski harvesting. The mud is a big problem.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don:
thanks for the information. This 99 has the two speed rotor and the farmer runs it between 420 and 520 rpm on the corn. Really no screenings running it this slow. I usually run ours as slow as it goes. How about the TR's on wheat? We just started growing wheat and I am wondering how the TR's should be set to combine wheat in the 60-70 BPA category. We will be swathing the crop with an 18 foot swather. The area farmers who raise wheat say there are too many green straw to drive and combine straight. Should one look at a draper header? Who has the best one out there? Mostly Deere in our area. Just two NH combines around. Dealer 40 miles away.
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nathan: Thank you for your reply. How do you like the air reel?
We had an Keho on a TR70 years ago. You could hear it two miles away. Lots of maintainance. Leaves piled up on the feederhouse.
I like the looks of the new machines. Our dealer even tries to discourage one from buying new, too much money.
 

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Interesting, Don. I take it, for owning that many combines in that amount of time, you must have done some custom work, too. That sure is a diverse variety of crops covered as well.


Back to what you stated early into your post. Old TR has a 97, but the 99 is still a neighbors. The trade-in candidate is a 960, which he calls "leftover." I can only presume he means a "carryover," which would still be a new, unused machine. Yes, I do agree fully about the upgrades to the 99, as well.

Still, he's got a lot of life yet to see in his combine, and above all, is is PAID for! That makes a huge difference, right there.

As said, Old TR, I can sure hook you up with some who have run all sorts of combines--and know how to keep them running for many more quality years to come.
 

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If it don't cost much - make the trade. You will not be disappointed with the TR 99. While Combiness might be correct in keping them running for longer you still can not beat low hour machines, PERIOD.

Jono
 

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Jono, the TR 99 already belongs to someone else! That's what I was trying to get back to Ecifarm's attention.
Sure, I could go with that kind of a deal, just as you and Don have mentioned, but that 99 is NOT the one looking for a new home just yet.


The combine in question, is a CR 960, last year's production, but still brand-new. Yes, that's one very expensive purchase--even with a trade-in!
 

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Check the original post - the trade has been made so the trade IS available. In any case my simple answer was yes, you can't beat good quality low houred combines, especially colours other than green.


Jono
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
CW:
Thanks for the comments on the TR98. I have been in touch with the dealer on the TR99. He has not gotten back to me yet. Any comments on wheat with the TR99? Do I need different concaves other than the round bar onels that it has? Other settings would be appreciated.
Thanks
Oldtr
 

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You're right Jono. Yes it was a little confusing at first, and I even read that post TWICE before making my own reply.


Two different CR 960's are mentioned. One, the TR 99 was traded in for, and the other is a consideration for OldTR and his middle-aged TR 97.

That now considered, IF the 99 is still there, having been ousted from home by the CR 960, then, yes, it would be an excellent choice to trade up to.

Another thing, is that OldTR talked about a TR 98, which is in the middle, agewise, but has more updates that the 97. However, it was NOT stated as to the presence of any 98, but just that it has more to offer than the 97.

One thing that really amazes me about the bigger [90 series] TR's, is their enormous capacity, relative to overall size. I knew a big 9600/9610 could handle roughly around 200 acres/day in the big west Kansas wheat fields, yielding around 55-60 bpa. In the summer of 1997, a neighbor invited me to come see his TR 98 New Holland. I had always liked the TR's and thought they were really cool combines, from all the literature and operators manuals I had read, but had never actually rode in one. They were just not common in places where I had lived.

I also never realized just how time flies when having fun. I was there maybe 6 hours and the entire circle [120 acres ] was done! Yes the machine had a 30 foot head. One circle in about 6 hours, is a lot of ground covered! I got off because I had things at home I needed to do, but did get at least 1 full roll's worth of pictures. My neighbor simply shifted over to the next circle and started cutting it. The next time I saw him, he told me [even before I could ask] that yes, the combine took 6 hours for that land, too.

Another thing carefully brought to my attention by this farmer, was just how well built and "beefy" the frame and axles are on the TR's as opposed to my own boss' 1680 or even the Maximizers. Yes, I took close-up pictures of this, too.

My close encounter with that TR 98 really taught me much about just outstanding they are. Last fall, I had the chance to actually run a TR 96 in corn for a few hours. It was really a lot of fun, too.
 

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Don't even hear it. Very quit. Works well. Its worth it on flat ground but where it really pays for itself is on hills. Either side hill or going down. But time pay back there.

Take care,

Nathan
 

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OldTR,
The TR-99 in question is worth waiting for. I would even pay a premium for it. Just get your hands on it!
You will need a universal or a small grain set of concaves for wheat. Just remember you'll need a set of small wire doors. The concave extensions are on the side doors.
Otherwise follow the manual settings for rotor speed, fan speed, etc. We generally run rotor speeds faster than usual. with the twin rotors it's hard to damage the grain. You may have to adjust acording to the straw dryness, and volume of straw. White caps may be a problem, so you may have to change settings accordingly.
You are right on to windrow the wheat if you have green straw.
We harvest malt barley in the San luis valley of Co. It's all windrowed. With the twin rotor you need to keep the windrow in the middle of the header to get most efficient seperation.
As for draper headers I much prefer the HoneyBee. They have a flex-draper that you can do soybeans with too. The TR-99 will easily handle a 30ft' header. The draper will feed in much more evenly.
Don,
Ph. 815-341-5101
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Update on TR 99 trade.
My neighbor has traded his 2002 model TR99 which has 939 engine hours and 695 separator hours on it.
He traded for a holdover CR960. He paid 104,000 American dollars to boot.
I am wondering what my 1994 TR97 with 1600 engine hours and 1350 separator hours would be worth in a trade. I appreciated your comments earlier and would like to hear what you have to say about the trade.
Thanks again
Old TR
 

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I would say offer to trade for $42 per sep hour.or $27500.
That doesn't take into consideration the improvements in the 99 vs. the 97. So whatever that might be worth would add to the offer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
That is what I am thinking of doing. I know that in the past there was about a 10,000 dollar jump between models on the price of a new machine. I guy that traded the TR99 said he thought it might cost us 50,000 to trade. I will have to see what the dealer says. He is having one of his best years ever. He is even trading Green machines in for yellow ones.
Thanks again for the insight
TR
 
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