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I am in the process of rebuilding a tr98, and I talked to Mike with Precision Farm Parts out of Sherwood ND. They rebuild the rotors and move the rasp bar segments so that they are opposed to each other, and not in the spiral configuration that comes out of the factory. It is suppose to use less power, thrash at least as good, and help stop the roping that we get, especially in viney crops such as our field peas up here in the north.
They also have a more aggressive back beater, and some other mods. available.
I have been watching this forum with great interest for some time now, and know that there are some great people out there with lots of info.
Thank you for all I have learned so far.
 

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I have not any idea what so ever funny thing was I was actually thinking about this same concept while on a long road trip today. I would think the only problem would be getting the material through ? I have no idea about a tr98 is it configured at all like a case ? do they do the same for a case combine?
 

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Quote:I have not any idea what so ever funny thing was I was actually thinking about this same concept while on a long road trip today. I would think the only problem would be getting the material through ? I have no idea about a tr98 is it configured at all like a case ? do they do the same for a case combine?

actually, the way to say this is "is a case built like a new holland?"

since new holland did the rotor thing "first" in the sense of a rotor that we know today.

the answer is no, kinda, but all combines are somewhat similar.

Matt
 

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Well first thing I see in the rotor picture is that in the threshing area you will have the same issue that pre S3 rotors had. Those used up till the last TR85's, that is thesharp loading and unloading of the rotor at the very beginning of crop feeding. The reason NH went to a spiral pattern was to make an even feeding load on the whole machine. Old combines had longer opposed bars not the short spiralled ones. This causes the rotor to be heavily loaded as the bars first engage the material then lessen the load just before the next set comes around and is heavily loaded again. The S3 rotors with the spiraled bars created an even load on the whole drive and engine throughout the rotors rotation.
Then they have spiraled bars at the rear separator section where rasp bars in most crops are not nessasary. What works best in most situations there are agitator pins that lift on the stems to allow better separation.
 
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