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Are the tracks reliable on grain carts?
Wondering if there is any to stay away from and also, we r spread out aprox 25 miles from one end of farm to the other how do they handle roading?
 

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We have had a brent 1596 on tracks for about 6yrs. Grease them everyday, road lots, not a problem yet.
 

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Local Case dealer recommends throwing some floor dry into the tracks before roading them. Helps lubricate the rubber somewhat.
 

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We have the first year production Elmer's 1600 on tracks, 2011 I believe, still going good. A few bogies had been replaced at the dealer before us and the undercarriage main beam has had a bit of welding but I think they had already redesigned them a year or two later. We only road at 15mph because we aren't in a huge rush but theres nothing saying you cant go faster. We grease it approximately every 40-50 hours and haven't had a bearing go in the 5 years it's been here. Would reccomend the Elmer's, probably would look for 2013-14 or later though
 

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How much more compared with tires ?
Tracks are reliable and cause little issue most of the time. If you are running in muddy conditions they are great. If the mud freezes not good. A new grain cart on tracks will run $35,000 or so above tires. Replacement tracks will run $8,000 to $15,000 per side. Floater tires will also run $8,000 to $14,000 per side.
 

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Tracks on our 2K Elmers have been flawless. You couldn’t give me a set of the older tracks on the Unverferth brands. They were nothing short of a disaster. If I was buying that breed it would have to be new enough to get into that next generation track. Maybe around MY 16+
 

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If a guy can not afford tracks IF tires give you 40% more paw print on the ground than regular radials and a lot more weight carrying capacity. We bought a older Balzer cart with tripples on each side and traded off the tires for the IF tires. It gives you quite a bit of floatation in a tire version. A 800 IF tire gives as much or more floatation as a regular 900 series radial. The tire technology has come a long ways. It is too bad most carts use old technology tires. Bias tires are probably the worst for floatation.
 

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If a guy can not afford tracks IF tires give you 40% more paw print on the ground than regular radials and a lot more weight carrying capacity. We bought a older Balzer cart with tripples on each side and traded off the tires for the IF tires.
Think you are getting IF and VF tires mixed up.
IF is 20% more load over radial, VF 40%, same pressures.
VF tires much thinner availability so far.

Either way, my vote would be tracks.
 

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Don you right it is VF tires that we put on. It is amazing to watch these tires as you put load on them. They turn into a upside down mushroom. Tracks are the best for compaction but the VF tires was a poor mans version of tracks for us. Six of these large VF tires gives you a lot of rubber on the ground for a grain cart.
 

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Our cart had six 800 65 R32 which in the VF have a foot print as large or in some cases larger than the 900 radials that often go on the larger carts. We went with the newer model of Alliance VF tires. My local tire guy wanted my used bias tires on trade which helped make it feasible. In the end we ended up with a cart with pretty good rubber under it for half the price of a used one with tracks. This was the first year using it and it worked well.. We were in some pretty soft ground for the last half of harvest after 3-4 inches of rain. After 5 weeks of wind and heat the ground now looks like it never had any rain.
 

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It is a 2000 bushel Balzer cart but we usually only fill it to 1400-1500 bushel. The cart has steerable front and rear axles and suspension on each axle. Our old cart was 1200 bushel and was to small to take two full dumps on the go from each combine. I like not having to fill the cart to the brim or overflowing. It is a lot more idiot proof having a cart that is too large. It often hard to use the full capacity of a cart when unloading on the go without lots of spills.
 

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Bjtjjl it is not the nicest looking cart but it actually works pretty good. The 24in auger is very fast compared to our old one.
 
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