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Was reading the article below and came across some claims that I am having a hard time believing. About half way down, they make the claim and show an illustration that a tire with a larger flat plate will reduce compaction in the top foot of soil compared to a smaller tire, but compaction at two feet down is unchanged. Supposedly the only thing that changed subsoil compaction is axle load, not tire size/design.



https://extension.psu.edu/avoiding-soil-compaction


Is this true? Seems to me that a tractor running on single 11.2X38's with 10k on each tire would have way more compaction at all depths than the same load on 800/70R38's...
 

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Very interesting. It does make sense. Interesting comparison of tracks and tires in relation to compaction. Tracks were worse than properly inflated dials.
 

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It makes sense when you think about it. The higher the axle load the deeper that compaction will penetrate in sub soil. However I don't think the sub soil compaction does near the damage the top 12" does. So maybe the big floats on high axle loads still compacts sub soil it don't do near the damage you would with less rubber.
 

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It makes sense when you think about it. The higher the axle load the deeper that compaction will penetrate in sub soil. However I don't think the sub soil compaction does near the damage the top 12" does. So maybe the big floats on high axle loads still compacts sub soil it don't do near the damage you would with less rubber.

Yes, I can almost see it to a point, but with my example, surely dual 800's would be wide enough to spread the load out to greatly reduce subsoil compaction compared to a single 11.2X38...


An extreme comparison, but doesn't it hold true? Surely you could put enough rubber under an axle load of 10 ton to stop compaction down low, couldn't you? Wouldn't duals with a large gap between tires (say 60" and 120" centers) spread the load out enough to make a 10 ton axle load similar to two five ton axle loads?
 
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