The Combine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was looking at a 2001 tx66 that is coming up for sale this spring at an auction sale. It only has 1200 hours on it and seems to be really nice and clean, but no one in my area runs this type of machine and I have never heard any input one way or another about them. Just looking for some feed back as to quality of these, or if they had any problems associated with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Good well built combine.
When my combine got to 1200 hours the main things that were
replaced were the straw elevator chain and the bearings in the
straw chopper electric clutch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,056 Posts
Mice like them. Make sure the fiber optics are good. Open the panel on the RH side (sitting in the cab). Make sure there is no sign of Mickey Mouse in there.
Other then that, should be a solid combine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
We have one, have had it since 2006. Ours is an early one built in 1995 so some of the issues we have had were not present on later ones. We grow canola, wheat, barley and oats. Ours has just a swathmaster pickup on it never a strait cut on our farm.


Pros: Its a good climber, we farm some pretty good hills some as much as 20% grade so that is nice. It also has good rear view mirrors and a descent cab for its day and much better that the TRs of that era. Good fuel economy. The chopper

Cons: High maintenance, at least 20 zerks every day plus more on 50 and 100 hour intervals. Lots of moving parts because of the Self Leveling Sieve although it has been trouble free it still concerns me.

Now the Hates: Where do I start, the fact that this thing is sitting in the shed for me to look at everyday bugs me. Anyway, horrible electrical system things work then they don't and its not mice. I hate the engine, the 7.5 New Holland is a poor poor starter and is running way to fast, rated no load speed is 2650 rpm. Straw baffle door over the chopper is a pos because straw would hang up on it and plug the walkers until we modded it. the stone trap is useless. And last but not least poor poor poor capacity in all crops along with a poor sample in canola makes everything I mentioned above that much worse.

Would I buy one again NO, would I trade for a 9600 Deere doubt it. Before this fall ours will need a new feeder chain, elevator chain, rub bars and concave, just to name a few. We bought it with around 750 engine hours we now have 1200 sep and 1500 engine hours and if we can come up with the money it hopefully will be gone for this fall. Most guys love the TXs we don't and because of all this we will likely switch brands the the next time around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
I guess i should have gone in to more detail about what i meant comparing a TX66 to a 9600, When we were on the hunt for a combine in 06 we basically had three models to look at because we wanted to stay with a walker machine. They were the JD 9600 the New Holland TX 66 or 68 and the Massey or Gleaner 8680 or C62. The Massey was our first choice but it didn't work out so we went with the TX as it was 10 miles from home. The John Deere was just way out to lunch on price 20 to 30 thousand more, at least, for the same hours. We have around us at least 11 Deere 9000 walker series combines and after talking with one owner who runs 2 9600s and a 9500 they have one big draw back from a TX and that is if you plug the cylinder. Its a afternoons work to get the slug out of a Deere, its 10 minutes by yourself, two minutes with two guys on a TX. Yes some days i wish we had a Deere others not so much, mostly i with we had gone with a 8680 or a C62 just for the 8.3 Cummins alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I ran an 8680 on 300 acres before getting a TX. The Cummins was nothing to get excited about. Under powered in the hills and used way more fuel than the TX. The 8680 liked to throw grain over and plugged the walkers a few times which was not fun. That belt in the back was not a great idea either.There is maybe more upkeep to a TX and all those 10 hour grease fittings do keep you more aware of any issues that may pop up. The sidehill shoe does save quite a bit on sidehills and on turning and you will find out how much if it quits working. They have advanced electronics comparable to some of the newer machines but replacing a circuit board can be an expensive touch. 9600's have their issues also and having combined with them they could not keep up in grain quality, cleaning , capacity, fuel economy or versatility. There are an aggressive machine and shine in tough conditions and tend to overthresh when real dry. You will not have the walker loss like the JD. Friend with 2 9600's in wheat has very high cracks in sample because they have to have the concave up tight and cylinder speed cranked up too to get rid of unthreshed heads. On a 2001 you should have a reversing cylinder for plugs and the header reverse and inch ahead feature is very nice to have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
Run 2 TX 66s. A 96 with 3100 sep hrs and a 01 with 2000 sep hrs. Good machines a fair bit of upkeep but at those hours its to be expected i guess. The self levelling shoe is amazing how much it saves you in the hills like cowboy said. Decent power but the 7.5 is hard starting. Only needs a whiff of ether on those frosty mornings. Comfy cabs with the beer cooler under the seat nice touch. Have a hard time getting a clean sample in canola. The rotary separator works good in the tough cereals. One of the better factory choppers in that era. Been lucky havent had many electrical issues only rubbed through wires or burnt out shaft sensors. Has anyone tried an air foil chaffer instead of the factory sieve? My sieve frame fell apart on the older machine and did a h*** of job on the sieve and fan.:mad:
Overall a good machine especially in the tough conditions. Very reasonably priced for the capacity. Not perfect but what is?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
In canola I had good success changing the shaker shoe speed and the seives set usually the same as wheat which is pretty open and a lot more wind than you would think. Just watch on the top of your header all the trash and what happens in road gear on a windy day. The canola being a round seed tends to stay put and the chaff blows off. Concave pretty well wide open and cylinder speed fairly low. In super dry conditions you tend to overload the seives with trash and slough it over so opening things up to increase the air flow helps. Not as good a sample as a rotary but usually within 1% dockage and cracks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Look at the drive belt for the shaker. It's a double pulley with different sizes top and bottom just like the rotary separator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I was also considering a 9500. There are 2 good ones with around 2000 seperator hours on them at local farm auctions as well. I have been advised they have poor capacity and early one are way underpowered. I am from southern Alberta and we dont cut really heavy crops typically. I dont know where everyone else is from but sometimes a combine that is under powered to one person might be just fine to another. I was a little concerned about all the electronic component on the TX as well. We currently run 2 old 1460s with 4500 hours that we have had since new. I imagine most thing would seem like a step up to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
They have a lot less electronic stuff on them than the present manufactured combines. You do not need any special oem equipment to repair any
electrical faults. You certainly do not need a laptop for reprograming
the computer. Most every problem I had electrical did not stop the machine
from harvesting. Even a bad computer board. I usually can do some minor
hack to keep going and fix it proper later. Mine has no computer controlled
engine so that is a huge advantage possibly for simplicity sake. It does have
engine shutdown for high heat or low oil pressure which is computer controlled though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
You have to try pretty hard to plug a 9600/9500 cylinder, the feeder house slip clutch will slip before the cylinder plugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
hard starting

Found out the hard starting can be fuel draining back due to a weak solenoid. Some have even put a one way check valve in the fuel line so it doesn't drain back. That's why it takes a few pumps to get it going sometimes. Fairly simple fix.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
Found out the hard starting can be fuel draining back due to a weak solenoid. Some have even put a one way check valve in the fuel line so it doesn't drain back. That's why it takes a few pumps to get it going sometimes. Fairly simple fix.
I've seen many guys put inline fuel pumps on their TX's to solve this issue
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,519 Posts
Found out the hard starting can be fuel draining back due to a weak solenoid.
My Claas 595 would do that, if you put it away with a near empty fuel tank it was a pig to get running the next year.
The two times I put it away full it started normal fast.
Only problem is you ty up 1000$ these days to do that!;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,800 Posts
My Claas 595 would do that, if you put it away with a near empty fuel tank it was a pig to get running the next year.
The two times I put it away full it started normal fast.
Only problem is you ty up 1000$ these days to do that!;)
Yes Don but with the rising fuel prices you probably have a better rate of return than most of your mutual funds. Unless of course you were hanging onto some Viterra shares
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Sounds to me like TX66man lives in an area like mine. 9 out of 10 combines are green and I am almost certain they are all paid by john deere to promote the products. lol
I agree that the TX has a few weak areas that should have been addressed long before my 99 was built but overall I am happy with mine. I have combined with a neighbours 9600 and anothers 9610 both times in barley and there was no comparison. I was doing nearly 3.5mph to their 2mph with very little loss and very clean sample. I know the tx is also much bigger in canola by a long shot. Wheat is the other crop commonly grown here and that is the one that the deere walkers are about the same size mostly cause the tx tends to overload the seives in wheat.
Some of the things that bug me about the TX are the hoplessly slow unloading rate and some of the combine was built a little light. Example we have changed the walker to body bearings twice in 1200 threshing hours.
As far as repairs go there are good and bad everywhere. The neighbour with the 9600 loves his and has had nearly no problems in over 3000 t hours and the one with the 9610 has many more problems than we do and had a 9600 before that with similar issues.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top