The Combine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the correct procedure for unslugging these combines? I was trying to cut some beans today and the outside round had some green weeds in it, and apparantly this machine doesnt like the green weeds. It started slowing down, and killed the motor. I started it back up, opened the concaves as wide as they would go, and tried the rotor again. It started to go, then slowed way down for a long time, then killed the motor again. I took out the book, and read what the book said. put rotor speed in neutral, rotate until belt is halfway down on both sheeves, put rotor back in low. Take bar and rock rotor back and forth, then engage rotor. I tried this and it died again. I can rock the rotor pretty good with the bar, but can't go all the way around, as the belt slips. I looked in the front side where the concaves are, and didnt really see what looked like a bunch of weeds. I dropped the door underneath the rear of the feederhouse, and same thing, not much in there. I think I liked all my old "green" machines better, as I could always unplug them!(lol)
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I might have "other" problems, as after I finished rocking the rotor, then I couldnt get the rotor to engage with the switch! Called a C/IH tech, he had me check voltage back at the solonoid at the rear of the motor that drives the separator belt. I didnt have any juice! He told me to wiggle the wires going from there, through the wiring harness, up to cab. If that didnt work, he would come down in the morning. I wiggled them all, but didnt do any good. Went home, and he called me to ask if that had helped, but I told him no. He asked how fast I had the rpm going when I flipped the rotor switch, I told him wide open. He told me to try it just about 1000RPM. I said, if I dont call you back, still come down in the morning, and thats where we left it. I went back and idled the combine to 1000RPM, and flipped the rotor switch, and it started to go, but promptly killed the motor. I tried it once again, and rotor wouldnt turn on this time. So that's where I am at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
664 Posts
i would take the rotor doors off and start pulling stuff out, there should be a dang wrench u can turn the rotor with. ive had to unplug many a combine by hand.

NEVER unplug a combine at full rev, so hard on belts and clutches and what not

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
975 Posts
Ok heres the deal. Put the rotor in neutral, and run the machine to clean it out. Then put the rotor in low in the middle of its adjustment range. Back it up as far as you can go with the wrench. Run it wide open and engage it . If it dosen't go do more rocking if not drop the concaves and start digging.

Three big things are......
1. Let the machine clean out with the machine in neutral. This makes sure everything else is cleaned out and working. Also all the power is devoted to the rotor.
2.Always especially on a 2188 with a wet clutch engage the rotor a wide open if it is slugged. The clutches need wide open to get the proper PSI to lock the clutch up. Otherwise they will slip and burn up.If anyone tells you different they don't know what they are talking about.
3.Have someone watch the belts while you engage it. If it don't go STOP. This will save you belts and clutches.

One last thing. I had a solonoid problem with mine once. It would drop out going across the field like it was slugged, but it wasn't. Also if the pump or the clutches get weak it will cause a problem. We had to rebuild our clutches once a year and install a new rotor belt. Also get the 500lb spring in your rotor pulley. It makes a world of difference. There is times it pulled down to 1600 rpm then picked up and ran.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,259 Posts
I'm going to guess the "rope" of green material is about at the front grate on the back side. May have even made it to the center grate. Should take up a pool on the location of the slug.


Seriously, rotors dont like green stuff. They make some really nasty material ropes. Those ropes dont transport rearward very well. They tend to roll around the rotor beating the holy sin out of it and if you're lucky, they make to the beater/chopper and plug it instead of the rotor. Sometimes these ropes can bend the cage and or bend even break concaves and grates. Definately can bust up transport vanes.

Had a neighbor slug a 1460 and dropped the concaves down onto the auger bed and started the machine............
took a while to fix that screw up. But, if you slug your machine again, its been my experience to not power things through till you locate the slug and see if you can remove some of it by hand first. Usually the first time it kills the engine, the slug is still in the concave area and once the concaves are lowered, the "OH SHI....OOT!!!!!!" wrench can still rock things around till you can get a hold of some of it. Otherwise, I learned the more power you put to the slug, the tighter the slug gets and the further from reach it will stop the rotor.


Good luck. Hope you get it going again and get your crop in.

btw: I realize you were just combining along and likely did'nt hit a slug of material, but the roping still occurs and I used the term slug as a general description. Also something to keep in mind is the rotor belt's torque sensor only tightens the belt in one direction of rotation. So if you rock the wrench the wrong way even once, it will loosen the belt and it wont tighten again when you rock the wrench the other way. That's why most of the time a human can slip the belt but a powerfull engine cant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
975 Posts
Quote: ive never heard ANYONE ever say to wide open engage...... i think ur crazy dude.... no offense

Matt


I have slugged a few rotors, and helped unslug a few so I know it works. Those words cams straight from the CASE-IH Tech. Nomally you engage it slower, but when it slugged the clutches will slip at a low RPM before it engages because the pump is not creating enough pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Although I don't like the idea of a full throttle engagement it is better for the clutches. When we got our first 2188 I plugged the rotor, opened the concave, rocked with the wrench and thought it was loose enough to go. I set it at about 1100 rpm, watched the rotor rpm and engaged the switch. I then proceded to watch the rotor rpm climb very slowly and stop, went back outside to the sickening smell of burnt oil and clutch plates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
If you can get the rotor to turn backward for a few rotations with the tool. Remove the access panel for the front of the rotor. and dig the green crap out of there. It is a lot easier than dropping the concaves.

If you do drop your concaves ( unbolt them) and u want to start the machine in like that, make sure they are not touching the augers. I have a tool made that sits in there so I can start the machine with them down.

I alwas rev it wide open to get rid of a slug.. If you are killing the motor, I would say the rotor spring is good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Linux, why unbolt them. Just pull the 2 pins on the hangers and drop all 3 at once. We replaced the cotter pins, on the hanger pins, with spring type so you don't need any tools at all to drop concaves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,118 Posts
Not being green sited only, but I too have always engaged the rotor on high when it's slugged... more power to the drives, more power to push it out and pull through... but then again more power to pack it in tighter. Read the operators manual, it should tell you in there where to engage it when "slugged".
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,011 Posts
Actually Alex Deere only recommends mid throttle position but does not prevent high idle engagement like a lot of others do. For example a CR 9070 has the wimpiest engagement on the planet, auto 1500 engine speed than a good 5 second run up to full engagement still at 1500 than you press throttle up (as opposed to go with throttle up)(O you might be to young Challenger shuttle). Completely opposite of Deere.
Wonder how others handle this?

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Don if we're talkin other brands the massey u just push a button to reverse and then push it other way till it clears. Just wish i had the $$$ to get the new massey way farther advanced then the other machines. Our 2388 you have to rev it up some to engage the seperator all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
We always put to full throttle to unslug the rotor it says that in our operator manual for our 2388. It will usually clear the slug unless doing peas and have the concaves open to much and no room to lower it for cleanout. The rotor wrench should be used to rock back and forth not sure what doornob talkin about but the wrench goes right into the driven pully no belt involved in rockin rotor.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,011 Posts
Quote: ive never heard ANYONE ever say to wide open engage...... i think ur crazy dude.... no offense

Matt


Deere including 08, 9870 allows high idle engagement. Do you think if they had any drive line concerns they would electronically allow it? In fact, the 9860/70 has the best threshing mechanism drive in the industry, from engagement at 2340 to 0 in 2 seconds, no slip, no flat spot, no break, no matter what pulley position. This makes reversing rotors and slug wrenches irrelevant, and plugging extremely rare, because it didn't slip in the first place.

So there.

Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Guys here is how you unslug rotor. If you have a loader tractor around pull up to the side of the machine with bucket aimed at center grate. Pull the center grate first and hook chain on the underneath side of rotor as far to the back side as you can reach. Have your bucket so you are getting the correct angle of pull. Have your gearbox in nuetral. It make take 3 tries but back up slowly with tractor. You cant believe how easy this works. Have had several longtime axial flow owners do this and they just cant believe it. Works very easy and absolutely doesnt hurt anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Don- So what you're saying is that at full throttle you throw the switch and nothing slips, pulses, or hesitates? Instant lock up! That's impressive!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
I think it says to run wide open and engage the rotor in our IH book but I couldn,t bring myself to do it. I shut the combine off and rolled it as far back with the wrench as I could then started up and re-engaged the rotor,had to do it 4 or 5 times,I started at 1000 rpms and then fire walled it. Then I went to a different field!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top