The Combine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So we've been looking to add a little machinery storage. Nothing too serious, but we've been keeping our eye out for a used steel building as they seem to be able to be had for cheap sometimes. My brother's father in law came across a good used one for $35K in Utah (600 miles away). Completely dissembled, just has to be trucked to Montana.



Anyone know how much it would weigh (how many tuck loads)? 21' sidewalls and clear span. What would it cost (rough ballpark) to get someone to erect it?



At 200' wide and 400' long, it would be WAY overkill but it would take care of added storage on the farm for a couple generations to come (we are only looking to add about 8,000 square feet, not 80,000) but 43 cents per square foot is pretty cheap machinery storage...


Thoughts? Is it even feasible or is it going to take a quarter million dollars or more by the time it's all said and done? (which would still be reasonable on a square foot basis, but we can really only budget about $100K)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
406 Posts
Only thought I have is that you wouldn't have to build the whole building. A 200 ft square building would still be huge and maybe you could sell the other half to someone. Or you could build the whole thing and put in a couple of hockey rinks lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,315 Posts
I'll take the other half!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
2.25 lbs for every square foot is a good starting point for your trucking estimate. And don’t forget loading and unloading costs at each end. Crazy good price for the building though. Big building like that is probably tall. Probably need a crane to erect it, price probably jumps pretty fast. Best would be to get all inclusive bids for reconstructing I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
2.25 lbs for every square foot is a good starting point for your trucking estimate. And don’t forget loading and unloading costs at each end. Crazy good price for the building though. Big building like that is probably tall. Probably need a crane to erect it, price probably jumps pretty fast. Best would be to get all inclusive bids for reconstructing I think.

Loading on a truck is included in the $35K.


2.25 lbs. isn't too bad, that's only 4 truck loads - I was thinking it would be way more than that.


Not sue what pitch the roof is, but yeah, a crane would be a must. What is each truss and post assembly going to weigh? 200' of clear span would take a heck of a beam.


Not even sure who to call to get a construction quote from... We could dig and pour the footings ourselves no problem so we just need someone to assemble it for us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Only thought I have is that you wouldn't have to build the whole building. A 200 ft square building would still be huge and maybe you could sell the other half to someone. Or you could build the whole thing and put in a couple of hockey rinks lol.

The thing is, I don't think we would be saving much by only putting up 1/2 - yes, it would still be way more than we need, but while everything is setup to build it, might as well build the whole thing.



If you happen to know the brand see if you can find extrection plans.

Will put a call in to the owners and see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
A 200' wide clear-span building with 21' eave height? That's gonna have some hefty rafters. Also some pretty major horizontal and vertical loads at the baseplates that need to be accounted for in the foundation. I work for a contractor, our buildings are typically on drilled concrete piles, and need to have rebar tying in the baseplate loads to the floor slab.



This is a major project that IMO you need an engineer and an experienced builder for, so I'd start there if I were you. At least get an engineer so they can tell you what you need to do for foundations etc to make sure it doesn't fall down, and have them inspect the work as it goes along. And don't get the local hinkydink engineer; get one that does metal buildings regularly. A good one will be worth every penny he charges. It's not his time you're paying for, it's his knowledge.


Wild ass guess (from another country) for cost of erection might be 7-12/sf down there if the building is simple enough and there are no issues during the build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
A 200' wide clear-span building with 21' eave height? That's gonna have some hefty rafters. Also some pretty major horizontal and vertical loads at the baseplates that need to be accounted for in the foundation. I work for a contractor, our buildings are typically on drilled concrete piles, and need to have rebar tying in the baseplate loads to the floor slab.



This is a major project that IMO you need an engineer and an experienced builder for, so I'd start there if I were you. At least get an engineer so they can tell you what you need to do for foundations etc to make sure it doesn't fall down, and have them inspect the work as it goes along. And don't get the local hinkydink engineer; get one that does metal buildings regularly. A good one will be worth every penny he charges. It's not his time you're paying for, it's his knowledge.


Wild ass guess (from another country) for cost of erection might be 7-12/sf down there if the building is simple enough and there are no issues during the build.

Have an uncle that has his PE and is a head engineer for a large all around construction company - would be letting him call the shots on the foundation.


Agreed with the professional builder for erection - I'm sure it will cost WAY to much - even $5/sq ft would be $400K but I will put out some calls and see if I can get some quotes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Could always lease the extra space to a neighbor if someone was needing some storage.

Not a terrible idea - what would a reasonable rental rate be? 5¢/sq ft/year? 10¢? 1¢/sq ft/month?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
Have an uncle that has his PE and is a head engineer for a large all around construction company - would be letting him call the shots on the foundation.


Agreed with the professional builder for erection - I'm sure it will cost WAY to much - even $5/sq ft would be $400K but I will put out some calls and see if I can get some quotes.
Can always pay them todo the structural steel setting and you can handle the sheeting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
You're getting a screaming deal on the building materials, at least.

Not sure on rental rate but then if you have a nice floor, you could even use it for grain storage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter #16

·
Registered
Joined
·
689 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
You're getting a screaming deal on the building materials, at least.

Not sure on rental rate but then if you have a nice floor, you could even use it for grain storage.

It would almost be big enough for grain storage - it would only hold 1.5 million bushels...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I lease a 60X120X20 high off a neighbor for 5K per year. His insurance covers the building, mine covers the equipment. If his building burns down he’s out the building and I’m out the equipment. If my combine burns in a field that I rent it’s the same. Works well at income tax time as a lease is a write off, whereas if I own the building only the depreciation is.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top