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Discussion Starter #1
This is the first year we've tried triticale silage bales and I was wondering if anyone else has fed them with a bale processor. We have a newer highline with fine chop and I'm just worried that the wetness of silage will make it plug up a bunch. I really don't want to have to go buy a vertical mixer to feed them tho.
 

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Our neighbor uses a Highline with the fine chop to feed silage bales and wrapped hay bales. Says it works ok, Takes a lot of power though.
 

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We used a high line regular chop to feed about 12 bales a day years ago when we had cows. If the silage is too wet it won't leave the rotor chamber . If I recall correctly it had to be very wet for this to happen. The frozen bales are hard on the flails and rotor over time. I think we went through 2 units over a six year period.
 

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Does a guy have to take the plastic off is using individual wrapped bales? If the weather doesn't smarten up I am considering getting a guy in to individual wrap bales.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ya you would def have to take the wrap off. We just did them in long tubes not wrapped individually
 

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I'm stumped by this question. What else would you do with the plastic?
Run it through the processor. I didn't think it would work, but I have never seen the plastic that is used on individual bales.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So, as in let the cows eat it or pick through it? I guess that's the part that stumps me/ bothers me.
Im wondering if he was thinking the processor would grab most/all of the plastic in the drum like it does the twine
 

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Yes Cd, that was my hope. Starting to rethink individual wrap. My only experience with silage is in a pit. One last question though. If a guy goes with tube, how soon do the bales have to be wrapped? Just thinking about time from baling to moving them home and having the guy wrap them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was told about 24 hours basically because they start to ensile already at that point and then if your pressures aren't way up on your bales they'll start to squash out making it really hard to run through the wrapper
 

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OK, I got it! Sorry for going the wrong way.


Not sure how many bales per day or bales of silage per year you'd be talking about putting up.....I put up a few of them. Taking the line wrap off is super simple. Drive up to the row, get out, grab a razor knife, slice lengthways halfway up the bale for how many bales you want to feed, repeat on the other side. Then pull the loose stuff toward you and cut it off and ball it up. Load your bales. You can either take and cut the lower half off now, or just cut it off first when you get there next time. Seems way easier to me than trying to get it dug out of a processor.....but no experience, so?
 

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Yes Cd, that was my hope. Starting to rethink individual wrap. My only experience with silage is in a pit. One last question though. If a guy goes with tube, how soon do the bales have to be wrapped? Just thinking about time from baling to moving them home and having the guy wrap them.
Don't bale anymore than what can be wrapped that same day!
 

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Yes Cd, that was my hope. Starting to rethink individual wrap. My only experience with silage is in a pit. One last question though. If a guy goes with tube, how soon do the bales have to be wrapped? Just thinking about time from baling to moving them home and having the guy wrap them.
Need to be wrapped with in 12hrs....sooner the better!! And I use a highline for processing silage bales, but don't put through feed chopper....too hard on it, and cattle clean up without going that fine.
 
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