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Who remembers a Noble blade? That was a cool piece of equipment!
those huge sweeps were quite menacing looking. especially on the few newer units versatile / CCIL / New Noble made on cultivator frames.


I remember as kid my dad started collecting the old cart style blades with the single shanks and made a hitch out of a couple old diskers that pulled at least 6 of them. it was right about the time that we started chem fallow so it never got used much. I think the rod weeder was always plugging in trash was what prompted it, but if memory serves me, weed control wasn't great with them - any little rain afterwards and the weeds would just re root. with a rod weeder they were at least partially turned over.....


If the guys that designed all of that stuff to minimize disturbance and trash loss knew we were out in the fields with a pro till today they would likely roll over in their graves!!!!! different time and different problems..............
 

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Our neighbor has an undercutter which I believe would be the same as a noble blade. He uses it a lot and I have rented it before it is a nice tool to have. He even has subsoiler attatchments he can put on it.
 

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Our soils group had a 25' Noble Blade ( 5 5' blades) that we bought new in the 80's and rented out during the dry years. Later on it wasn't getting rented out so we removed the blades and added cutting coulters and shanks off a Haybuster zero till drill that we used for banding liquid into forage stands. It worked but wasn't popular either so we sold the whole thing off at auction and barely got scrap price. Too bad, the liquid tank was in good shape and had a newer pump. The blade shanks we removed were used by the Conservation Districts to make shallow water line machines for burying water lines to cattle waterers.
 

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One thing with the rod weeder if you had alot of smaller rocks it would lay them all up on the surface. Kept the rock picker busy.
Indeed they work awesome for floating rocks to the surface...if thats what you want to happen lol. I've done that in areas I wanted to clean up a lot of small rock prior to raking, works great. But is was a drawback with my Seedrites, as the rod packed things below it, so even with harrow packer bar you wouldn't do a good job of pushing back in the rocks, so now you had to pick the bigger ones. Always something good and bad with everything:)

You're dating yourself mentioning those crazy harrows lol, least thats what they are called in these parts. Never had one, but always heard they were very effective for spreading out straw and quackgrass roots.
 

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You're dating yourself mentioning those crazy harrows lol, least thats what they are called in these parts. Never had one, but always heard they were very effective for spreading out straw and quackgrass roots.
I was going to say crazy harrows but didnt know if anyone would know what I meant.:)
Ya they worked great for that and provided a good field finish.
ours were ground drive so 4mph was about top speed without tearing things apart and you had to take big corners. Ours were 36ft and there was a cable winch picker on the bar to load them for transport....I dont miss that one dam bit.
Very true like most machines good and bad in all.
 

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Morris rod weeders don't bring much more than scrap price nowadays but they were a big deal in the 70s and 80s. I pulled a 24 foot and later a 30. They had some good features but the points wore out fast in hard ground. Dirt worked its way up into the chain drives and eventually broke chains. I think the last ones they made (HR36) were an improved design but by that time tillage implements were not selling like they used to and I did not see many HRs around. Leon and Anderson made rod weeders too but Morris was the most common.
 

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@SWFarmService, dont scrap the stuff yet. :) Wont it fit nicely on a pallet to put out back in the tree row in hopes someone could use the parts in 5-15 years? :)

They are still used occasionally in our area, and we have owned a few for years, but this year I finally got to bust one out. Awesome is all I got to say. :)

They use 2050 chain, which our Gleaner conventionals use, so I drug the ol RD36 (or R36? whichever is the latest one with direct shaft drive) up to the shop, and went out to parts combine row, harvested some random used 2050 chain, cant remember exactly which drive on the L series Gleaners, but it was within one link of working, oiled and greased it, and did not address the loose lock collar and slid over drive sprocket on the LH wing. go down to field, unfold, throws chain off before I even get it in the ground. :)

Bring back to shop, and give that sprocket the attention it so desperately craved, and head back to the field, and not a single breakdown the entire time. 36 feet worked the ol 7040 Allis pretty good. in hard packed areas it had trouble staying in the ground.

I credit the rod weeder and the hoe drill with our wheat stand this fall. it had decent sub moisture, and the rod did an excellent job prepping the ground, and the ol hoes found the moisture. I would say 99.5 percent came up, just a few really hard areas in the corners have not came up. the neighbor let the fallow get away from him, he had to rescue it with a disc, and had a disc drill, and I am afraid only half to 2/3 of his came up, big blank patches everywhere.

So while it wont be used all the time, I liked it enough it will be on standby, nice tool to use when you need to use it.


Otherwise, most of the time the blade plow is our tool of choice, either Flex Kings or Nobles.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Sweeps, v-blades, Noble blades, undercutters, duckfoot plows (I heard that term from a guy from Montana)--whatever you want to call them--are still popular here. We bought a new 9x4 Plains Plow (used to be Kent, now Great Plains) last year; I kind of wish we would have went with the 11x4, but it still covers a lot of ground compared to the 5x5s it replaced. A good used Sunflower, Richardson, or Flex King will bring a premium at local auctions.

Rod-weeders in these parts were mostly Flex King, although there were a few Caulkins units around. I've never been close to a Caulkins, but they were all three section wing-folds, not the individual sections I see in pics from the PNW. I've also seen an ancient Deere at my neighbors' place that they put a diamond packer behind.

"Direct seeding" like most of you guys in the Prairie Provinces are used to has never really caught on here. Where you have replaced one-ways, rod weeders, and deep-furrow hoe drills with air hoe drills and single-disc drills capable of working through standing stubble, we kept the sweeps (combined with chemicals) for weed control and residue conservation, and switched to double-disc drills to handle looser soil and residue. I think most of that is just a function of our longer growing season, different rotations, and different weed problems.


What size is yours?, mine measures 54' and I my last wings are not hydraulic fold.
It's 40ft. I believe the center section is narrower than yours and it's all hydraulic fold, so yours must have a couple of short stub wings.
 

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It's 40ft. I believe the center section is narrower than yours and it's all hydraulic fold, so yours must have a couple of short stub wings.
Are you sure that's all the bigger it is? Mine has the same number of wings yours does. I seen on tractorhouse a 60 footer but that sucker was 4500$!

I got no hydraulic fold on the outer wings, if your board sometime this winter I would be curious to see a pic of that geometry. I have got an idea of what I want to do but curious how that one is
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I'm sure it's 40ft. Yours has a wider center section, and looking more closely at your pics, wider middle wing sections. The end wings look the same. I'm not sure why yours isn't fully hydraulic; manually pushing those end wings closed in soft ground would probably be a workout. Maybe it's an older model. The manual shows 40', 48', and 60' models, so your 54' is an odd duck to me. There should be a tag with model and serial number somewhere.
 
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