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Not in that dress.
Yes TA is trans axial.
That one of a kind description I don't think could be very far from the truth.
All though its not as sure a thing as informing me that the combine is yellow.


Don
 

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That is sooo differant. A yellow versatile, and even before New Holland bought Verrsatile. I'v allways wondered why Versatile didnt start making sp combines. Those were huge capacity machines for thier time. Just built a little weak. And John Deere copied it. and now Cat too.
 

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They did. But not the TA. I believe they were numbered 5000, a walker machine. Also as you say, built a little weak.
I don't know who copied who but they are fundamentally different.
A CTS used an overshot beater between the cylinder and the rotors, Claas a undershot and Versatile had no beater.
My uncle ran a Versatile pull type # 42 and my cousin ran a TA. Relatively speaking I was lucky.
Versatile could never be accused of over building their combines.
When PAMI tested the Versatile TA 2000 it is the only combine ever tested that rotor loss went down as feed rate increased right up to full power level of the pulling tractor.
Interesting that any search of Versatile turns up nothing on combines.


Don
 

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I own and use one of these, well a Versatile colored one, and have done thousands of acres with it. As someone already pointed out, they have their weak points, specially in the grain pan, several of the drive mountings, the electronics and the header itself, (it will literally fall off!). I have extensively tweaked and remanufactured mine and have made it in to a fairly reliable and high capacity machine. Some folks snicker at my little flippers and rubber hoses sticking out of the side shields that show things are turning, but it was better than spending thousands on new control boxes. When the grain pan completely collapsed, it came out in two pieces, and went back in almost a hundred pounds heavier and I had to modify the fan ducting to accomodate the truss brace added to the bottom of it. Have never touched it again, and the machine runs smoother than ever with a lot less bounce. As for capacity, I'm feeding 200 horsepower down the shaft to it, and it will kill the tractor stone cold dead before the cylinder plugs, however, if you feed it uneven to one side or the other, in a heavy crop it is quite easy to plug one of the rotors in back. Tailings are another problem when in canola, so I keep several C 65 v-belts on hand, cause when she plugs up, by the time you get her stopped the belt is done! I would esitmate it has at least half again the capacity of my 1682 Case IH, however, the 1682 does a better job in canola. And for baling straw, have round baled barley and oat straw behind the Versatile with an 855 New Holland...something you can never do behind the IH. Except that the days of using nothing but pulltypes are coming to an end, even for me, as costs simply are dictating the switch to straight cutting, I'd buy another in a heartbeat, and while there was a 17 foot straight cut header available, I've never found one as yet. So ultimately, the day will soon come where both of these will be retired. But I'm still proud to hit the fields surrounded by all that new shiny plastic and iron, knowing I can do just as many bushels per hour, and the whole outfit is worth less than one payment on a new 96 series Deere! It's really gonna break my heart too, to give up the ingenius idea of unloading out the right hand side! When I go with both machines, I always try to get my help to run the IH, as I hate having a sore neck at the end of the day! Why no one else ever thought of that is beyond me.
As for the yellow combine pictured above, it was an attempt after the purchase by New Holland to dispose of the remaining inventory, which was fairly signifigant. While the Versatile had retailed for over $60,000, many were sold for as little as $20,000, to simply get rid of them. I bought mine shortly after Deere released the CTS, and while there are structural differences, a good way to annoy Deere sales men is to refer to it as a "pull type CTS"...that makes their blood boil! The trussing of the unloading auger is something I have never seen before.
Interesting site here, look forward to checking it out more.
 
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