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Always seem like theres something. So I wonder if this along with clubroot will help to persuade some of the producers out there to extend there crop rotations, or add more crops to their rotations. You know something other than a wheat canola, or canola snow rotation. I just hope that one in four is going to remain good enough to keep these pathogens at bay. I look around my area and there are several guys running wheat canola rotation. Problem is they have gas wells, from the same company that has wells on our place, so what ever weeds and plant diseases they have, we're going to have them as well. All ready battling some weird fescue thats showing up on our ground on the lease sites, Because the oil field guys are so good at keeping there equipment clean.
 

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Always seem like theres something. So I wonder if this along with clubroot will help to persuade some of the producers out there to extend there crop rotations, or add more crops to their rotations. You know something other than a wheat canola, or canola snow rotation. I just hope that one in four is going to remain good enough to keep these pathogens at bay.
I think in Sweden they are using a four year rotation to(hopefully) manage the disease. Lots of guys around here still hanging in with the two-year rotation and don't seem too concerned about it.:rolleyes: This disease sounds even more scary than Clubroot or Blackleg because there is no known source for resistance if I am correct??? Are they revealing a location or waiting for it to be spread all over the province like Clubroot has already?

I'd be a little concerned if I owned a crush plant right now...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Bit more info.
Even worse is its not the sunflower type.



The CCC will be posting information on the disease life cycle and identification to its website and bring management practices to growers in time for seeding. The latest research will also be discussed at the International Rapeseed Congress in Saskatoon in July 2015. A few facts currently available on the disease include:

  • It is not the same species that causes verticillium wilt in sunflower and potatoes, which is common throughout Manitoba.
  • Symptoms include chlorosis of lateral branches or leaves (often one-sided), early death stunting. At later stages, the outer stem may peel back to reveal black microsclerotia.
  • The best time to scout for verticillium wilt in canola is at swathing, but it is even possible to identify this disease after harvest as microsclerotia will continue to develop.
  • It is a soil-borne pathogen that can survive in the soil for 10 to 15 years, so biosecurity practices similar to those recommended for clubroot can help prevent spread.
  • Fungicides are not effective against this disease and host resistance in canola is not available at this time.
 

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Not unlike Asian Flu, Bse this whole area should be quarantined,all crops distroyed and no canola for at least 15 yrs.
Maybe we could have stopped Fus if pro-action would have been taken when it was first discovered. We need leadership not knee jerk reactions.
 

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HhSeed, equipment quarantined at wilt-stricken Man. farm

Seed and equipment are now under federal quarantine at a Manitoba farm where a crop pathogen never before seen in Canada made its first-ever appearance in North American canola.

Without giving the farm?s specific or general location, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency said Friday it?s placed a quarantine order on seed from the farm at which samples were taken last fall to confirm Verticillium wilt in canola caused by Verticillium longisporum. [Related story]

A prohibition of movement order is also in place on equipment used to harvest the seed, CFIA said, adding it?s working with the farm?s owner to discuss ?treatment options? for said equipment, to make sure it?s cleaned of soil and plant debris.

The agency said Friday it?s still ?too early? to know the source of the fungus, but CFIA is running traceouts to learn how V. longisporum arrived at that spot.

CFIA said it also plans related surveys to rule out any further spread and to learn if this was an ?isolated detection? that may have been brought into the location on imported seed.

V. longisporum is mainly spread via movement of infested soil or diseased plant parts, CFIA said, noting ?some scientific evidence? that seed from heavily-infected crops may bring it to new areas.

In this case, the agency said, the single V. longisporum finding is ?limited to one location which is not being used for commercial production.? The Reuters agency and other media have described the site as a research farm.

?Given we are now in the post-harvest season and all crop material has been removed, and that CFIA biosecurity restrictions have been applied at the farm, there is no immediate risk of any further agricultural-related spread of V. longisporum,? CFIA said Friday.

While not previously reported in Canada, V. longisporum is ?prevalent? in Europe, Russia and Japan, and has been seen in crops other than canola in parts of the U.S. including California and Illinois, CFIA said.

?Disappointing?

Canada doesn?t yet consider V. longisporum a quarantine pest, the agency said, but once a pest risk assessment and surveillance work are done, it?ll decide whether to ?take action? under the Plant Protection Act to eradicate the pest ? or to slow and prevent it from spreading elsewhere.
 
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