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Discussion Starter #1
i know this has been mentioned time and time again on this forum, but i need some more input. my combine(9610) has 13-1400 sep hrs on it. i bought it just before wheat harvest apr-07 and it had brand new cranks and bearings in the walkers---they were oem parts. well ive noticed that here lately its got one that is getting really loose on the rear bearing. i grease it religously (50 shots) of grease daily!!! and this bearing seems to be getting looser and looser. is it possible to put in wood walker blocks on that one bearing and get through the season and then change them all over???? that maybe a dumb question but i just am curious is to whats the best remedy to this problem. these new parts have approx 3-400 hrs on them
 

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I would say 'yes' to your question...especially to get you through harvest.

Man, I am sorry that you are having trouble with that. Mine have been in for years, now.

You changed the crank at the same time? Man!
 

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Brew I had the same problems once before switching to wood. My alloys had more dirt than grease inside after a days run even with 30 shots each of NLGI 2. The last two sets of blocks I bought came from Loewan and I was surprised at how tight a fit they had even on worn cranks, and they seem to stay the same all through the season.
 

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I wonder at times if there were bad batches of walker blocks cast for JD or by JD, my 9600 has 2 that are loose and the rest are fine. Just a thought...

jd
 

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This may burn Txs butt a bit but I should mention that the new WTS machines use wood blocks, and I know the stress on those new walkers is higher. Not sure if they use bigger cranks however.
 

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Yeah, Dave...I knew the new machines used wood...
I'm not buring a bit!



I was just telling what has worked for me...you did the same...
Sounds as though our experiences are on opposite ends of the spectrum!

I can not help but think that the Guru is right, is his theory!
 

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Lowen Mgf. makes/has them. Google them if you don't know their address.

Also, here is a place that has them:
http://www.pfparts.com/9600.html
This place also sells the beater 'speed up' kit! Good place.

There's another place, but I can't recall their name. 'They' make the blocks that are smaller, for a worn crank..Anyone?
 

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Rosco:
It sounds like you have done a great job on the install on your wood blocks. I believe it to be true that the [correct and meticulous] install has just as much to do with longevity than the block/bearing itself. If the thing is not installed correctly, or is in a bind, it will not last long....
whether it be a cast-alloy bearing, or a wood block..

My 9600 originally came with wooden blocks. When my combine went in for the 'Green Light Special" @ the JD House, they recommended cast alloy bearings, both front and rear. The mechanic that did the work on my combine was so meticulous...I attribute his work ethic and 'style' to my walker bearings lasting so long...that and a bunch of grease!

_______________________________________________________________________________________

As for the blocks themselves, though, I was wondering if BrewMax should be asking for 8820 blocks ; or should he be asking for 9610 (or maybe even 9650 WTS) [upgraded] blocks. [Rosco,] Are your blocks "oil impregnated"? I realize that the "oil" in them will not last long, but I was under the impression that Mother Deere had come up with some sort of 'upgrade' pertaining to the block(s). Are your 8820 blocks 'oil impregnated', or just 'normal'?
 

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Just so there's no confusion, here:
I am ~not saying that there is a difference...

I was asking you which he should get:

Quote:As for the blocks themselves, though, I was wondering if BrewMax should be asking for 8820 blocks ; or should he be asking for 9610 (or maybe even 9650 WTS) [upgraded] blocks.
It was a question, but I did not end the sentence with a question mark.

I thought maybe your 'shimming' technique was your/the 'secret' to long-lived blocks.
I don't know if there is a different part number. The 8820 and the 9610 could very well use the same block. I was hoping that you would know!
 

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Brew I would just buy the Loewan blocks, they come with the bolts, paper shims if needed for newer cranks, and they are oil impregnated. Im sure they are cheaper than deere. 8820 blocks may work but are not suitable for extensive use in a 9600. There is a big weight diff between the two generations of walkers.
Timing can be an issue, but one that cannot be overlooked. The front mounts for the bearings are simple, put the blocks in and torque them to about 30 ftlbs. The backs depending on what year model machine you have will probably have elongated or slotted holes, making it difficult to time. The Deere tech manual has detailed instructions on timing the walkers which works well when using the alloy blocks but because of the grip the wood block has compared to the alloys with the walker mount they dont locate too well and I had to time them while operating the walkers slowly and setting them one by one during constant rotation. Otherwise by the book I had a binding problem. If you would like the exact instructions according to the deere manual I can post them if you want to try that route first.
Anyway, I would not mess with 20 series blocks but go get the ones for your machine.
 

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Thanks for clearing that up, Dave. I kinda' thought he should get the [walker] blocks for his ~particular machine...

Personally, I think posting the Deere instructions for walker block/bearing install would be great! I mean, I don't personally have the need for that info. at the moment, but I think it would be ~great info. to have [posted].

As much discussion as there is about this topic, I would think that your posting would become a sticky..(!)
This topic has to be one of the most frequented subjects there is, here in the JD Section of this Forum!

*Dave, do you happen to know the company that makes the under-sized blocks..for those folks who have worn cranks?
Does Loewan make both the standard and under-sized blocks?*

 

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Actually I thought that undersized blocks were a myth, and still do. How much undersized would any particular company have to make them to work. The only standard is new standard.
I Actually think that in most cases slop is in the alloy block for most of the machines out there. Adding new blocks of any sort will help the slop. I thought my cranks were shot on my 50 before switching to new wood blocks, but was amazed how new ones took up the play.
The alloys seem to start having radial play within one season, meaning play that can cause the walkers to rotate side to side a bit and maybe hit each other. Ive never had wood blocks get the same radial play for several seasons.

Ill post the Deere walker timing procedure next week. BUT keep in mind that it didnt work for me with the wood blocks.
I saw a video one time of the deere plant and the guy who set the walker timing did it with the walkers operating at about half speed, one by one, TOTALLY opposing the instructions of Deeres tech manual. ANyway, take care Combiners
 

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Discussion Starter #17
trust me guys, im going to get the correct blocks for my machine. straw walkers are rooted ratther deep and i dont wanna half a** them
. ive checked this one particular bearing that has me worried and its not to the 1/8 inch play threshold but its not far off. so im gonna keep a close check on it and hope i get through the season with it then change to the wooden bearings. i only have about 700 acres left to do unless i get some more work, then its on to a cotton stripper looks like. davedan i really appreciate your info, as well as everyone elses.
 

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I got my wood block replacements for my 9500 from abilene machine. They do have undersized blocks for worn shafts to keep you going without changing the shafts.

There is no reason at all to keep the worthless alum. greasers. None.
 

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Re: Loewen wood blocks - walker bearing trouble

Loewen does make two sizes of wood blocks for the JD9000 series walker combines, one for good shafts, and one for worn shafts.
 
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