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Discussion Starter #1
do one end of one walker at a time. Only one. Do not unhook all at once or it will be completely untimed.

You could do each of the rears first, then each of the fronts. Can't go anywhere if one end is hooked.

Use good locking collar nuts or double nut the new bearings. Had one get away once and it was not pretty.
 

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Sorry guys I forgot to post the procedure, I have it at my shop and will post it tomorrow night. I must say however that the procedure is not just for when you are converting to wood from alloys, it the Deere procedure for timing all walkers no matter the bearings you have.
Dont mean to be rude greengiant but sometimes you cant do one at a time, like when you have all the walkers out of the machine, or you have to change a crank shaft. ALSO you have to start with all the front bearings tight FIRST because the bolt holes in the front of the walkers are NOT slotted and the rears are. If the rears had no slots then you could not time them and there would be binding at several points of rotation with each walker.
Again I will post the exact timing procedure tomorrow but keep in mind that sometimes the procedure does not work so well. I have timed them when they were under constant slow rotation with all the fronts tight first then working back and forth from the outer walkers, tightening them little by little to eliminate any tight spots.
Ill elaborate more later after giving Deeres textbook procedure, which by the way is not the way they do them on the assembly line.
 

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Kinda for DaveDay..........at one point he said he would be able to outline his procedure for timeing the walker cranks after replacing the alum blocks w/ wood blocks......

maybe i've missed it inside a thread...if so sorry

anyone have the link...........or the procedure
thanks in advance
 

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This is Deeres textbook procedure however Like I said before its not what they use during assembly line production.
Timing of the straw walkers is performed as follows:
NOTE: When bearings or crankshafts are serviced
re-timing is required. If not timed correctly, straw
walkers will fail in a very short time.
1. Disconnect the straw walker drive belt.
2. Tighten hardware on the front bearings to the
recommended torque of 45 N·m (33 lb-ft).
3. Tighten the nuts on all the rear bearings and then
back them off slightly.
4. For each rear bearing, rotate the crank one full
revolution until the throw of the crank is at its bottom
most position. Tighten the bearing.
5. Tighten the bearings in the following sequence:
• Outside Left
• Outside Right
• Inside Left
• Inside Right
• Center (if applicable, on 9600)
6. If a tight area is noted during the revolution of the
crank, loosen and re-tighten the previously set bearing.
7. With all hardware tight, rotate walkers by hand and
check for any resistance.
8. If any resistance is detected, repeat the complete
timing procedure.
9. Walkers should rotate freely.
10. Torque all hardware to 45 N·m (33 lb-ft).
1401,DV574 -19-17SEP96
Straw Walkers and Crankshafts/All Walkers - Timing Procedure
TM1401 (28JUL97) 120-15-3 9400 Thru 9600 Combine Repair
280797
PN=876
120
15
3
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If you are just replacing the alloy with wood, you can just replace one bearing on one throw at a time without removing the drive belt and there will not be a need for retiming. Pull that belt off and start taking bearings off and you will have it all wrong. I know this to be true because I have done so. If you are going to replace a crank, then of course you will have to retime which is not rocket science and you don't need a book to figure it out, just use your head and note where all the crank throws are at, go from there. Works every time. I also know this because I have done so. If they are not in time the "very short time" it takes to destroy them is like about a second if you can even get them to rotate.

If you r&r the back one first, it will still be in the correct position after you do the front. Where is it going to go? It is still bolted in front. There has been nothing to change the distance from front to rear. If the walker was out, then you have to do the front first. I also have done this.. wrong I guess. but it hasn't failed yet. As long as they spin free who cares?
 

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I never said that this was my method but Deeres textbook method, but ill take your advice and try to "just use my head" because I to have done so.
Just posting what sbark requested.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Me too, always good to know what the educated guys at deere tell us. Only reason I posted my last
message was because I thought the question centered around replacing the alloys with wood which does not have to involve even removing the drive belt except to spin them when you are done.

After rereading sbark's original post I see he was asking for you specifically so I must backemoutofhere..sorry for the cornfusion. Ignore whatever I wrote.
 

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im fixing to do the swap from alum. blocks to wood. im a little confused with info above, so its ok to remove one bearing at a time and replace with a wood block without rotating it? actually i guess you need to rotate it in order to feel for rough spots wouldnt you?
 

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We had to replace 2 walkers last fall. We put the original alum bearings back in as they were still good. We took one walker out at a time and went through the whole timing procedure when done, spun it a bunch by hand. I would rather spend the time to get it timed right than replace more walkers cause it's no fun...and not cheap. They were like 6-700 for each walker if I remember correctly! If you're not sure consult someone who is.

P.S. I must have done it right because we combined 200 acres of beans and about 1000 acres of corn after I replaced them...broke in half during bean harvest.
 

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This is Deeres textbook procedure however Like I said before its not what they use during assembly line production.
Timing of the straw walkers is performed as follows:
NOTE: When bearings or crankshafts are serviced
re-timing is required. If not timed correctly, straw
walkers will fail in a very short time.
1. Disconnect the straw walker drive belt.
2. Tighten hardware on the front bearings to the
recommended torque of 45 N·m (33 lb-ft).
3. Tighten the nuts on all the rear bearings and then
back them off slightly.
4. For each rear bearing, rotate the crank one full
revolution until the throw of the crank is at its bottom
most position. Tighten the bearing.
5. Tighten the bearings in the following sequence:
• Outside Left
• Outside Right
• Inside Left
• Inside Right
• Center (if applicable, on 9600)
6. If a tight area is noted during the revolution of the
crank, loosen and re-tighten the previously set bearing.
7. With all hardware tight, rotate walkers by hand and
check for any resistance.
8. If any resistance is detected, repeat the complete
timing procedure.
9. Walkers should rotate freely.
10. Torque all hardware to 45 N·m (33 lb-ft).
1401,DV574 -19-17SEP96
Straw Walkers and Crankshafts/All Walkers - Timing Procedure
TM1401 (28JUL97) 120-15-3 9400 Thru 9600 Combine Repair
280797
PN=876
120
15
3
I have a 6600 and am replacing all four straw walkers. Unfortunately my brother didn't know not to take all of them out at once or we were going to have a hard time timing them again. I read the threads on timing but I still don't understand.

So say your going to install an outside straw walker first....from what you said rotate until wood bearing is at bottom and tighten. But where should the front throw be at that point?....at the bottom too? I put one back in and the front of the straw walker hits the inside of the combine. There got to be a trick to this instead of me constantly adjusting and hoping. Hope this question makes sense.
 
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