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We've been seeing quick melts with powerful water flows that are washing out the draws in our field. It's been a real problem these last few years, they keep getting worse.

What is everyone else seeing and what are you doing with it?

Used to fill them back in to continue farming straight through, but our washouts are 4' wide and 2' deep in some places now. What a waste to push black dirt into a washout, just for it to be gone the next year. I've been thinking to smooth it out and seed it to grass, or maybe ***** willows or dogwoods. This doesn't help productivity but I don't see any other options.
 

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I have crazy washouts, I ripped some land that was just foxtails and too alkaly to grow crops and i have a small scraper about 7 yards. I use the scraper and scrape the sod off those areas and fill the beginning of the washout with sod so it can't happen again. Then I pile some dirt uphill try and redirect the water so it flows across a wider path down the hill. This worked for a real bad ravine I had every year.
In the fall i use my front end loader and cut chevrons in the field before winter so in spring i divert the bad parts then work it over in spring and do it again in fall.
 

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I have a couple of large draws that would wash bad, and while I can work across them if I wanted too, simply because of how they would wash I leave them in sod. Unfortunately they run crossways to the longest rounds, but I can still drive across them, just lift things out of the ground to do so and when seeding or spraying, always do one round of headlands so I have no misses, do avoid them when spraying roundup though. At some points on both of them I need to watch that with the pull type combines I don't slap the straw spreaders into the ground when the wheels hit bottom, but thats a lot quicker and easier than having to make headlands and turn around twice instead each round. Most of the time have those two fields in hay or pasture for as long as possible. Even cutting and baling hay across them is pushing things, can't go near them with the forage harvester and hydump. Only thing that don't seem to mind them is the cows lol. Buggers like to hide in them actually, not sure if there is less bugs or what it really is, as they are about 10 to 20 feet to bottom at the deepest parts and fairly wide, a lot of cows can hide in them and you will never see them until you crest the top edge lol
On my home quarter it can wash bad in a couple places, when in crop will feed the cows lots in them during winter when feeding hay, helps build up a mat, much the same idea as CP and his sod relocation, and when seeding into grass, you just hope and pray you get it established before you get a down pour. Several years back had it in oats, was at neighbors having coffee and a thunderstom hit and absolutely dumped on the area. When I come home, I had top soil washed out on top and over the county road, had two inches in the rain gauge...
Thats a problem when most of your land is the highest point around, no matter what some municipal engineer might try to convince you of, believe me, water runs down hill lol.
 

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Dumping rocks in them and filling them in? We got one ulgy bugger. Must be 3 feet deep in places. Of course it splits a perfectly square field in half
 

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We've been seeing quick melts with powerful water flows that are washing out the draws in our field. It's been a real problem these last few years, they keep getting worse.

What is everyone else seeing and what are you doing with it?

Used to fill them back in to continue farming straight through, but our washouts are 4' wide and 2' deep in some places now. What a waste to push black dirt into a washout, just for it to be gone the next year. I've been thinking to smooth it out and seed it to grass, or maybe * willows or dogwoods. This doesn't help productivity but I don't see any other options.
MARUSKI , if you have a laser scraper cut down the ditch to standard slope specs and then slope the sides so you can drive through in the fall. I have this problem too, as a result of a R. M .ditch cleaned out last fall which EXCEEDed the ideal slope out of the field. I actually had a substantial waterfall in my field and I am a red river valley farmer! Not hundred percent sure on the industry specs on a standard slope in a field and not at all complaining of the R. M ditch but I have to deepen the field ditch so I can lessen the erosion. This washout was grand canyon like so went out with the frontend loader last week to fill in and intend on fixing it with the scraper in the fall. just my 2 cents
Never saw anything like it before.
 

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I have a water run that has to stay in grass. Runs at an angle in the field. I curse it every time I work in that field but am thankful it’s in grass every spring when the water gushes through. There’s another one that was grassed but doesn’t see as much flow that I sprayed out in sections over the course of three or four years that is holding with just the stubble. All the rest hold with stubble. I find if you can make them wider they will erode less.
 

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I would shape them so you can drive through them and then establish permanent grass in them. Another option is to smooth them out and mulch them. We will push them full of strawy manure and that does a good job of holding
 

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Get flax straw in there and find clay below your top soil if you have any. Put layers of each with a bale shredder and a dozer for dirt. Plant fast growing plant mix in there with longer growing deep rooted plants. This may sound stupid but mix up canola and oats barley,tillage radish and put it there to develop a crop mat. Never work your fields other than with your drill at seeding. Flax straw binds everything together and doesnt rot like other straw giving plants time to get their roots deep to bind it all together. Fix the runs this spring and seed through them and after harvest plant them asap with the mix broad casting and a harrow with no tillage there ever again.
 
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